For The Trainers: Did I Cross A Line?

Topic 24418 | Page 1

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Big T's Comment
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Do any of you ever discuss health issues with your students? My current student is diabetic, but still eats a lot of candy, sweets, etc.

I told him I don't know his history , and that it is between him and his doctor, but if he is diabetic he needed to be careful.

Did I cross a line? Should I have let it be, or said something to my DM?

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
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Big T although I am not a Swift mentor, I can safely say I don’t think you crossed the line one bit.

Perhaps he is doing that because he is experiencing low blood sugar which he can pass out if it gets to far below 70. Or if his blood sugar spikes while he is driving and you are sleeping? Could be a serious problem either way.

You did the right thing, not only for the good of your student but your own personal safety.

Marc Lee's Comment
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APOLOGY IN ADVANCE IF UNWANTED. I REALIZE REQUEST WAS FOR TRAINERS TO RESPOND.

As a diabetic student I don't think so but I personally would prefer a question such as "may I ask about your choice of candy?" to what may come across as more of a challenge or criticism.

G-Town's Comment
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APOLOGY IN ADVANCE IF UNWANTED. I REALIZE REQUEST WAS FOR TRAINERS TO RESPOND.

As a diabetic student I don't think so but I personally would prefer a question such as "may I ask about your choice of candy?" to what may come across as more of a challenge or criticism.

So Marc...

As a diabetic do you think it wise to ingest all that sugar? Not trying to put you on the spot, but I think your answer can likely help others.

Also, no apology necessary. You are perhaps better qualified to address the subject than most of us. I didn’t forget what you went through to get your waiver.

Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
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I don't think you crossed a line. As a finisher/Trainer with CFI, we are supposed to check a student's CDL and medical card when they get on the truck. If your trainee needs insulin, it needs to be refrigerated. Do you have a fridge on your truck?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Big T's Comment
member avatar

Thank you for your input Marc. Ditto of what G-town said. My title was intended to grab trainers' attention. One of the values of TT is anyone can input and everyone can see the discussions.

Thank you G-town

Big T's Comment
member avatar

He doesn't require insulin. I have the 40qt Coleman in my truck. We are also supposed to check their documents when they get on the truck.

I don't think you crossed a line. As a finisher/Trainer with CFI, we are supposed to check a student's CDL and medical card when they get on the truck. If your trainee needs insulin, it needs to be refrigerated. Do you have a fridge on your truck?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Thanks all. So here's my situation... of course everyone's is different.

I was diagnosed with diabetes in approximately 1996. I have utilized virtually every therapy over the years from oral meds to just diet and exercise (and a few others along the way) to now a combination of oral meds and fast-acting insulin delivered via an insulin pump. I have been using the current therapy for about 20 years. While I try to eat reasonably healthy, for me it is all about carbs and insulin. As long as I take approximately the correct amount of insulin for the carbs I injest, my blood sugars stay in acceptable (essentially "normal") ranges. Essentially, I can eat whatever I want and maintain the blood glucose levels of a non-diabetic. A Snickers bar requires 7-units of insulin. Not saying it is the best thing to eat... just saying I can, and sometimes do eat one. As long as I take the seven units (perhaps a bit less to he safe while driving) it will not be a problem for me. (This is why I would prefer being asked than "warned")...

FYI... I am in the process of filing an appeal to try to get my current health insurance carrier to pay for the Dexcom G6 Continuous Glucose Monitor (GCM). This will allow me to monitor my levels 24/7 on a remote display (which I plan to Velcrow to my dash) or on my smart phone and my smart watch (if/when they support the new Note9 and Galaxy Watch).

Again... just what I do to manage this condition to minimize the negative consequences. Not saying it is right for anyone else... just saying it works for me.

If anyone wants more details I am happy to share. For any diabetic having trouble maintaining good blood glucose levels, I highly recommend the book "Think Like A Pancreas." It changed my lfe!

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
If anyone wants more details I am happy to share.
As long as I take approximately the correct amount of insulin for the carbs I ingest, my blood sugars stay in acceptable (essentially "normal") ranges

That sounds like a recipe for permanent insulin addiction, does it not? I don't know if you can force the body to overcome this condition over time through changes in eating habits, but I know the body won't adapt to anything if it doesn't have to.

So at some point you must have tried something akin to the Keto diet where you stick almost exclusively to fats and proteins and nearly eliminate carbs altogether. Have you tried that for an extended period of time, and what happened with it?

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Big T, everyone has a different approach to how training should be conducted. Some have a wider, more holistic approach where they'll teach about anything that might contribute to the person's success. Others will stick with a very narrow and focused curriculum revolving around only the core aspects of the job.

Personally I've taken on a large variety of challenging endeavors over the years and I've learned that finding success at all of them required far more than just a basic set of skills and a little practice. You have to commit yourself to these endeavors in body, mind, and spirit, especially if you want success at the highest level.

One of the most important aspects of success in trucking is conserving and maintaining your energy levels so you can work very long days consecutively without burning out or losing focus. That requires eating healthy, maintaining a healthy weight, learning to get as much sleep as possible and sleeping as hard as possible when given the chance, keeping the interior of the cab quiet most of the time, keeping your nerves calm, and more.

Sure, you could just stick to teaching steering, backing, and paperwork. But is that really teaching someone everything they'll need to be successful out there? Would you really be satisfied with the job you're doing for your students?

Personally, I have an approach to teaching that's very simple: I'll tell you what I know, you do with it what you like. That way I know I'm doing my job to the best of my abilities and at that point it's up to the student to learn with the best of their abilities. I want to make sure I share my knowledge and experience to the fullest in order to give people the very best chance of succeeding.

As you've seen with the materials we have here on the website, we believe wholeheartedly in teaching a holistic approach to succeeding in this industry. Nothing is off limits if it's going to somehow help someone have a better chance at success in trucking.

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