Split Reset Question.

Topic 24470 | Page 3

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Susan D. 's Comment
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No. Only a consecutive 8 hour period in the sleeper berth will pause your 14 hour clock.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Keith A.'s Comment
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So you can do the 8 and the 2 in any order but the two on its own does nothing?

Turtle's Comment
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Right

Old School's Comment
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It's a mind bender isn't it Keith?

When you figure it out you'll find it very helpful at times.

Turtle's Comment
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The 8 in sleeper will pause your clock from the moment you went in sleeper. That's a separate benefit aside from the split. You have to fulfil both segments to complete a split

RealDiehl's Comment
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The other thing I noticed was the OP.. spent an excessive amount of time "on duty" while at a customer, 0748 to 0819. Does your company require you to remain on duty the whole time at a customer? If they don't, get checked in and go off duty. The minutes spared will help your 70 hour clock and could make a huge difference for you.

Hi, Susan. The time spent on duty from 0748 to 0819 was from the time I stopped at the gate (they didn't have a door assignment yet). I then parked and checked in with receiving. They gave me a door and said another truck was just finishing up there and I could pull in when they left (this commonly happens at Walmart DC's I deliver to). About a quarter of the time I have to wait even longer until they give me a call and a door assignment. Never considered logging off duty while waiting. Doh! Seems pretty obvious now that you mentioned it. Thank you for the tip, Susan! It's not a big issue with the dedicated account I'm on (I never run out of 70) but it sure would make a big difference OTR and it is something I will remember. And no, I'm not required to stay on duty at customer.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Pete's Comment
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Brandon.. neither you or your dispatcher were keeping track of your 70?!? Wow.

The other thing I noticed was the OP.. spent an excessive amount of time "on duty" while at a customer, 0748 to 0819. Does your company require you to remain on duty the whole time at a customer? If they don't, get checked in and go off duty. The minutes spared will help your 70 hour clock and could make a huge difference for you.

At my company, we're relieved of duty at a customer once we've checked in, but I'm guessing not all companies do that, so I just wanted to ask.

I'm a complete noob here, haven't even started school yet, so I wanted to ask this question and I'm glad this topic arose. Can you be off duty and in the truck? The way I understood it if you are in the truck you are still responsible for it so you can't be off duty, but you can log sleeper berth. Am I way off base or is that how works? Not trying to sidetrack the post from the 8/2 split discussion, just wanted clarification.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

I'm a complete noob here, haven't even started school yet, so I wanted to ask this question and I'm glad this topic arose. Can you be off duty and in the truck? The way I understood it if you are in the truck you are still responsible for it so you can't be off duty, but you can log sleeper berth. Am I way off base or is that how works? Not trying to sidetrack the post from the 8/2 split discussion, just wanted clarification.

What's up, Pete! As far as I know, yes, you can be in the truck off duty. In fact, on your ELD (Electronic Logging Device) there should be an off duty option you can select. You're off duty when you take your 30 minute break. Or, as Susan reminded me above, you can go off duty while waiting for your door to become available. Unless your company forbids it for some reason, I don't see why shouldn't be allowed. Then again, I don't know everything...

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I always go to the sleeper berth line when at a customer. The reason being that I can gain the advantages of the 8/2 split if I end up needing them.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I too make it a habit to go into sleeper berth when at a customer. You just never know when you might get delayed. Getting 8 hours in the sleeper ASAP can turn a delay into an advantage.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

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