Physical Agility Tests As Part Of Pre-hire Conditions

Topic 24481 | Page 1

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S B.'s Comment
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Hello,

Are all trucking companies require an agility tests as part of the hiring process ?

Is it the same for both men and women ?

What did they require you to do ?

Thanks

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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I lifted a box with weight in it, carried it maybe 20 feet and back. They added 10 pounds at a time and I repeated the carry until it got to 50 pounds.

Then reached above my head and unscrewed a bolt and then put it back together, then pulled on a strap attached to the wall.

I don’t remember doing anything else.

Old School's Comment
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Agility tests are different at each carrier. Basically they want to see if you can perform the basic functions required by the job. If you apply for a flatbed job your agility test will likely be more involved than a dry van type job. You may need to show you can lift a hefty lumber tarp with eight foot drops up to your shoulder or onto a trailer. In a dry van position you may need to demonstrate crawling or "duck walking" under a trailer. They want to make sure you are able to get underneath and check the jars on your fifth wheel locking mechanism. It's strictly job related functions.

Do you have a specific concern?

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
CK's Comment
member avatar

I did not have to take any sort of physical agility test for reefer at Prime. I have a friend who is doing Flatbed here, and he will be required to do one as part of his flatbed training.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

BrandonCDLdriver's Comment
member avatar

I did not have to take any sort of physical agility test for reefer at Prime. I have a friend who is doing Flatbed here, and he will be required to do one as part of his flatbed training.

I didn't have to do anything for Ozark. All we pull are dry van and container though.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
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I did not have to do one for CFI. You need to be able to climb in and out of your truck several times per day. You need to be able to climb into and out of the trailer. You need to be able to lift the hood, pull your fifth wheel and tandem releases and duck under the trailer.

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Solo's Comment
member avatar

TMC you have to do some balancing on each leg, then crawl under a trailer, then lift/carry a 125lb lumber tarp down the side of a trailer to the tongue and put the tarp onto the deck, then lift yourself up onto the trailer just using your arms, then lift the tarp back up and put it on top of a suicide coil, then using 3-points-of-contact walk around the edge of the coil so that you can drag the tarp off the coil and back onto the deck of the trailer, then using 3-points-of-contact exit the back side of the trailer, then roll the tarp back onto your shoulder, carry it to the rear of the trailer, and throw it on the ground for the next guy. After that, you have to walk up a ladder to the top of a shipping container that's on a trailer, walk around the top of the trailer and hang your toes off the edge (to make sure you're not afraid of heights), then come back down the ladder.

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