Scaling A Load

Topic 24487 | Page 3

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Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Looking past the legality aspects of scaling those loads, it would be a wonderful learning experience. He would have another driver there to help him figure out how to get it legal. It's a shame there aren't more GOOD trainers out there. Grumpy if you end up staying with that trainer please don't be afraid to ask anyone here for advice. If I remember correctly ldrship had given you his contact info so he could probably help you with company specific stuff.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

It amazes me how many drivers I interact with at the DC who were never taught how to properly weigh and scale a load. Not just rookies either...

It’s rather shocking.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

It amazes me how many drivers I interact with at the DC who were never taught how to properly weigh and scale a load. Not just rookies either...

It’s rather shocking.

I agree G. And is is not the least bit difficult once you are shown how to do it. 3rd grade math.

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Just to state for the record. Wolding does not have lease ops. The have a power only program for O/Os but they are NOT trainers. All trainers are company drivers. Probably 99% of drivers at Wolding are company drivers.

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Just to add about using the drive air bag pressure gauge. We tend to go to the same places and carry the same types of loads. You get real used to where you need to have the tandems slid in relation to weight. If your PSI gauge doesn’t match up where it should be based on type of load, weight and where your tandems are it tends to stick out like a sore thumb.

That being said, it is official policy at Wolding that ALL loads over 42k in the box are supposed to be scaled. I honestly don’t scale as often as I should. Unless it doesn’t look or feel right. Thing that is a shame most of the places we go the scales on site are NOT conducive to weighing out each axle (axle group). The reason is they have ramps on and off the scale.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Just to add about using the drive air bag pressure gauge. We tend to go to the same places and carry the same types of loads. You get real used to where you need to have the tandems slid in relation to weight. If your PSI gauge doesn’t match up where it should be based on type of load, weight and where your tandems are it tends to stick out like a sore thumb.

That being said, it is official policy at Wolding that ALL loads over 42k in the box are supposed to be scaled. I honestly don’t scale as often as I should. Unless it doesn’t look or feel right. Thing that is a shame most of the places we go the scales on site are NOT conducive to weighing out each axle (axle group). The reason is they have ramps on and off the scale.

That is good to know. Maybe he has scaled in the past and knows how it should look on the psi gauge. But every load was over 42k. Since I’ll be driving, should I push following policy and scaling those loads?

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

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That is good to know. Maybe he has scaled in the past and knows how it should look on the psi gauge. But every load was over 42k. Since I’ll be driving, should I push following policy and scaling those loads?

When you are driving you are the captain. This job requires you are willing to stand your ground. Just like the military type A personalities thrive. When you are driving it is YOUR license on the line. If you get a fine for something, it is YOUR fine, not your trainers.

I would make sure to scale. You will learn what right looks like eventually. The only thing is the trainer has to be the one to pay for the scale at a CAT Scale. He is the one that will be authorized the reimbursement.

Even if a scale looks flat, doesn’t mean it is. A lot of scrap places we go are not the best about their scales. If you want to know if you can get away with weighing your axle groups out; pull your drives on the scale. Hold the clutch in a release your foot off the brake. If you start rolling it will not be 100% accurate. If there is an obvious ramp, don’t bother trying to axle out your weight. It won’t be accurate.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

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That is good to know. Maybe he has scaled in the past and knows how it should look on the psi gauge. But every load was over 42k. Since I’ll be driving, should I push following policy and scaling those loads?

double-quotes-end.png

When you are driving you are the captain. This job requires you are willing to stand your ground. Just like the military type A personalities thrive. When you are driving it is YOUR license on the line. If you get a fine for something, it is YOUR fine, not your trainers.

I would make sure to scale. You will learn what right looks like eventually. The only thing is the trainer has to be the one to pay for the scale at a CAT Scale. He is the one that will be authorized the reimbursement.

Even if a scale looks flat, doesn’t mean it is. A lot of scrap places we go are not the best about their scales. If you want to know if you can get away with weighing your axle groups out; pull your drives on the scale. Hold the clutch in a release your foot off the brake. If you start rolling it will not be 100% accurate. If there is an obvious ramp, don’t bother trying to axle out your weight. It won’t be accurate.

I asked him this morning and he said he has scales his axles and knows where the gauge should be to be legal.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Here is an FYI. If you are going to a shipper that requires a certified MT scale ticket, get a CAT scale , then after you are loaded go back to the same location. When you scale loaded it will be considered a re-weigh as it is for the same load.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Here is an FYI. If you are going to a shipper that requires a certified MT scale ticket, get a CAT scale , then after you are loaded go back to the same location. When you scale loaded it will be considered a re-weigh as it is for the same load.

Thanks

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

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