When Looking For A JOB

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Robert E.'s Comment
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Warning From The Moderators: You are about to receive some terrible advice. Do not follow it. We'll explain why in our replies. We're leaving this here for the sake of teaching.

This is just a short list of a few things I have found helpful, and most of them are easy. 1.When reviewing a company got to their Facebook page and read the reviews from other drivers, when a rive is boasting about how great the company is simply check out his facebook profile an see if he still works there. That really tells you a lot. 2. Go to the company website, if the front page is only talking about drivers and hiring then they are in the business of hiring drivers and not really trucking that much. you see they get your info and sale it to whoever buys it,also those companies usually have a high turnover rate, cause the more rivers they go through the more money they make, Now that doesn't apply to all companies who do this ,but most of them. 3.Check out the reviews and learn to read between the lines. 4........I would love to get feedback and hear some more ideas on how to look for and land the right driving job. Just another note I was working for a company for 2 yrs and everything was great , then my dispatcher quit and I got someone who didn't know too much about anything so I quit and now I am looking for a job. another quick note, For me the most important thing in the industry is pay ,followed by treating me with respect, or at least treat me like I treat you.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
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You obviously don't know much about trucking. If you have been a safe driver for two years, then you know how to find a job. Don't come here blowing smoke.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Tractor Man's Comment
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Ummmm.....ok.......???

confused.gifwtf.gifrofl-3.gif

I thought the Full Moon was last week.

Robert E.'s Comment
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Big Scott (CFI Driver/Trainer and biggest fan)

Sorry you misunderstood me, I am only trying to help. can you explain what you are talking about? Cause I`m just trying to help others and look for a job myself and also staying positive about the whole process. I will never make a claim I know anything.Plato once said "I am the wisest man alive, for I know one thing, and that is that I know nothing.” I dont live by that knowledge but it does keep me focused time to time.

Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
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You are steering people the wrong way. Facebook is no place to find honesty. It's one of the worst creations ever. This site was created to give people honest help in starting a career in trucking. Here you will find we don't pull punches and we care about the people who truly want help. We don't advocate jumping ship at the first bump in the road. If you take the time to read through this site you will find that we all work hard for and love the companies we work for. Why? Because they take care of us. We have resources within our companies to help us if we have problems with things like dispatchers. The biggest help or hindrance to an individual is their attitude.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
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Also, if you have been a safe on time driver for two years then you can't go wrong with CFI, Prime, Swift, Schneider, or Knight to name a few. Also, look here.

And Trucking Company Reviews and Apply For Truck Driving Jobs.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Here is a thought... don’t quit without first finding another job. Dispatcher quit? Great freakin’ reason to walk. NOT. Horrible example.

OMG...are you for real?

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
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Hello Robert, and welcome aboard!

I think we can help you out. Let's go through your conclusions so far...

1.When reviewing a company got to their Facebook page and read the reviews from other drivers, when a rive is boasting about how great the company is simply check out his facebook profile an see if he still works there. That really tells you a lot.

I really am not sure how you came to that conclusion. You yourself said this...

I was working for a company for 2 yrs and everything was great , then my dispatcher quit and I got some one who didnt know too much about anything so I quit and now I am looking for a job.

So, we cannot assume you were working for a really bad company can we? Look, things change for people and they move on. Your dispatcher got changed and it was a deal breaker for you. I once worked for Western Express, I loved it there and made a really good living. I got a really sweet offer and I jumped at the opportunity, I'm still at this new job now, several years later. So, the fact that I moved on honestly doesn't tell you anything about the place that I was working. I would still be there had not this other opportunity opened up for me - I had a sweet gig over there.

2. Go to the company website, if the front page is only talking about drivers and hiring then they are in the business of hiring drivers and not really trucking that much. you see they get your info and sale it to whoever buys it,also those companies uselly have a high turn over rate, cause the more rivers they go through the more money they make, Now that doesnt apply to all companies who do this ,but most of them.

Do you really believe that stuff? If you do, could you please explain to us the logic that says "the more drivers they go through, the more money they make?" Drivers have been saying this kind of nonsense for decades, and I have never understood how they can believe such silly notions. A business like trucking makes money by having productive professionals who know what they are doing and have the ability to make things happen out here. This business is a commodities business with very little margin for error. Look up the financials on publicly traded trucking companies (the mega carriers) and you will see that they are only making razor thin profit margins - something like 3 - 5%, maybe just a little more when things are going really well. Wall Street investors are not exactly making a bee-line to invest in the transportation business, it's a tough nut to cut. It's a really rough business and one of the main things that help them make money is having great drivers who understand how to get results out here. New drivers do not fall in that category, and these companies do everything they can to get them to that level. Unfortunately most of the new drivers cannot handle the transition into this really challenging career so they quit or move on for reasons that never help them advance their careers.

3.Check out the reviews and learn to read between the lines.

So, what is it that you are reading between those lines? When a total noob who hasn't got a clue starts spouting all kinds of nonsense about his company not paying him, or not letting him go home, or making him go to the Northeast, or claiming he's being treated like a slave because the company is trying to teach him how to maximize his hours, just how do you read between those lines. Because if you come up with the conclusion that this is a really bad company to work for, then you are reading between those lines with the typical bias that keeps people from really comprehending this industry and how it works. I read in it that here's a guy who doesn't know what he's doing, and now he has failed miserably, so he is laying all the blame on his company. He's simply not made of the stuff it takes to be successful at this. Have you ever read between the lines the way I do? You should try it sometime, it will transform your job search. It will liberate your mind from some of the brainwashing you've allowed to take over your good common sense.

Continued...

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
For me the most important thing in the industry is pay ,followed by treating me with respect, or at least treat me like I treat you.

Here's how this works in the trucking industry. Our pay is performance based. I work for Knight transportation, I earn some great pay. It isn't because of the pay rate they offered me. I produced results. I got noticed by the people who are trying to get results on their bottom line. Then, I started getting pay increases. Imagine that - a trucking company who wants to keep a driver and pay him more money! Everything about trucking is based on your performance. Your years of being out here on the road really don't mean anything if you don't produce something worthwhile. A good annual gross pay and the respect you mention are both earned. Nobody is giving respect or great money out to people who can't produce the kind of results that show they've earned it.

So, now we've come full circle. The company name on your truck's doors means very little in the whole scheme of things. What you do, how you produce results, and how easily you work together with your management team will have the greatest effect on your results in trucking. Top Tier Drivers get the top results. Here's an article I recommend for you to read, I think it will help you understand how to get out there and be the best you can be. Don't waste your time and effort on trying to read between the lines and figure out where the money is at. It's right at your fingertips, you just need to understand how to make it happen.

Show Me The Money!

Tractor Man's Comment
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Robert,

To your points. #1- Social Media is a cesspool of anonymous faceless people, stay awayfrom it. #2- Companies have websites to hire drivers. What would you like to see on their Homepage? Weather reports?. #3- 95% of internet reviews are garbage, posted by malcontents that will never be happy with any company. Refer to point #1. Who did you work for? What does your driving record look like? Would you want a employment reference from your previous employer? Why in the world would you quit before you had a new job. There are probably 1000 companies that would gladly hire an experienced driver with a proven record of performance in a heart beat. Why are you having trouble getting hired. This is a performance based industry and quality drivers are ALWAYS in demand. You say pay is the most important thing to you followed by respect. Pay in this industry is quite competetive among the majority of carriers. Respect is something you must earn. It is not handed out like participiation trophies. This website has a wealth of information. Spend several hours or days combing through it. We would all be happy to help.

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