Lowest Fuel Levels I've Had

Topic 24502 | Page 2

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Jamie's Comment
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Very unwise to let your fuel get that low.

It wasn't my fault, I was on a highway route out of WI coming to MO, with very few truck stops along the way. Schneider didn't give me a fueling stop for the 540 mile trip and I was already at 3/4 of a tank when I started. I also stopped once at a loves and requested a stop but they didn't provide me with one. They eventually did give me one, which is where I'm at now. They don't usually let it get down this low.

Of course we can fuel anywhere basically if it meant not running out of fuel, but I tend to follow their fuel stops.

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

Also to add to my last reply, that was with my last assignment then I had to drive another 160 miles to the flying J I'm at now after picking up my new load.

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

I work for Knight and my DM tends to leave me to my own devices, so if I say I need a fuel stop he just sets me up there easy enough. It's always better to err on the side of caution for fuel-- just as a hypothetical if you had gotten stuck at that truck stop in a absolutely terrible storm and the power goes at the truck stop so you can't pump fuel you're talking about a really unsafe situation.

You'll get to learn what the range of your truck is and whether you can keep moving on the fuel you have or don't. And if you're going into a dry stretch of truck stops it is sometimes worth topping the tank off.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Shoot, my company runs me down about that low on the regular between stops. Knowing my truck the way I do, I know I could go at least another 75 miles or so if my guage read the same as that.

That being said, I still agree with the others. You really don't want to let it get that low. It's tempting fate.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

When you submit your fuel level via QC always submit that you're a little less than you actually are.

So if you're at 3/4 fuel submit it as 5/8. If you're 1/2 submit it as 3/8. This way it won't run you dry.

It's a simple computer macro. One of these days you'll hit that fuel island it routed you to at 1/8 of a tank and it'll be shut down for tank maintenance and you'll be screwed. Your safety comes first

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

In my job, delivering trucks to dealers, I need to deliver the truck almost empty. (I don't want to give free fuel away!) This is company policy.

So in a way I'm playing chicken with the E on the fuel gauge. In my experience I can get pretty close to the bottom of the gauge, but I still worry.

My trainer ran empty once. We had to buy a fuel can, get 5 gallons Diesel back to the truck, put most of it in the tank, pour some into the top of the engine fuel filter and push a small pump handle there to prime the engine. And finally run the starter, praying the engine would start up. It finally did.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

In my job, delivering trucks to dealers, I need to deliver the truck almost empty. (I don't want to give free fuel away!) This is company policy.

So in a way I'm playing chicken with the E on the fuel gauge. In my experience I can get pretty close to the bottom of the gauge, but I still worry.

My trainer ran empty once. We had to buy a fuel can, get 5 gallons Diesel back to the truck, put most of it in the tank, pour some into the top of the engine fuel filter and push a small pump handle there to prime the engine. And finally run the starter, praying the engine would start up. It finally did.

Primarily aimed at company drivers, exceptions such as yourself apply.

In response to 3rd paragraph- Had to do that to a reefer in the Montana cold at midnight in January. Was so much fun. Life is easier now.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

When you submit your fuel level via QC always submit that you're a little less than you actually are.

So if you're at 3/4 fuel submit it as 5/8. If you're 1/2 submit it as 3/8. This way it won't run you dry.

It's a simple computer macro. One of these days you'll hit that fuel island it routed you to at 1/8 of a tank and it'll be shut down for tank maintenance and you'll be screwed. Your safety comes first

I've done that since I started in trucking, my TE told me to do that to get one sooner. I did that, but they still didn't give me one. I suppose they didn't like the prices at the places I was near, I had enough fuel to make it to the one I was going to but barely.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't know the prices off the top of my head but it will always be cheaper to put in at least a little bit of fuel to get you where you're going than it will be for them to make a road call to bring you fuel, or even to call a tow truck. If it isn't cheaper to just fill the tank entirely.

I used to work for a trash company and the starting price for a tow was $500 or $600. That's if you were empty. Went up if you were loaded if I remember the owner telling me correctly.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Alright Jamie, here's my thoughts on this. Your truck, you are the captain, so it is your fault if it quits running after being starved for fuel. Fuel tanks will freeze up quicker with low fuel levels. A road service call will cost at least $500, no matter how far or close you are to a diesel pump. Lastly, there's a bunch of sludge and other junk in the bottom of the tanks. Better take a look at your fuel filter. Dispatch only knows what's happening with your fuel state when you tell them.

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