CRST Exit Oppurtunities???

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Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Misunderstanding team pay is also a contributing factor in the bad pay horror stories. If the night driver is cranking out 650 miles a shift, and the day driver is cranking 450 miles, it looks lopsided--until you realize the day driver is not only dealing with traffic, but also bumping twice as many docks as the night person.

Each driver can feel cheated. "All he does is drive all night. He never has to deal with customers, drop and hooks or cranky customers. I even fuel more than him". While the other guy is saying "Come on...450 miles, he is slacking!"

One guy here bashed CRE team pay not realizing all miles are paid and split. No matter how we explained it, he insisted he would only make $750 per week average. And he didnt even work there yet, just bashed!!!

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Smart C.'s Comment
member avatar

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How concerned are you about the horror stories regarding the pay?

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Smart C, there are horror stories about the pay in trucking at every major carrier there is. Who do you think writes these horror stories? Well, let me enlighten you. Those things are written by the very people who have not figured out how to make it as truck drivers. I can think of three people in this forum over the last few years who got started at CRST, and they did very well. You have got to realize that trucking is a performance based business. We get paid based on how much we can accomplish. Unfortunately it is not that easy for new drivers to excel at this, and then when you pair them up with another driver who is a serious slacker, you have a recipe for disaster. There are problems with starting this career as a Team driver. You can't blame those problems on the company or accuse them of not paying well just because you aren't turning the kind of miles that produce nice paychecks. As long as you and your co-driver are getting it done, you will do well. If you can't muster up what it takes, then you will do poorly. Trucking is something that doesn't work out well for a lot of the people who try it.

People are so accustomed to having regular jobs that pay them a certain amount of money for whatever time they spend on the job. It just doesn't work that way in trucking. We get paid for being productive. It is actually a great way to get paid in my opinion, but it sure separates out the pretenders. You will do just fine at CRST if you can prove to be productive. The problem is not only that you are inexperienced, but you add another layer of difficulty onto it by having to join yourself at the hip with another inexperienced driver who can prove to be a big drain on your pay. People have these problems and then all they know to do is blame the company and claim they pay "slave wages." If they were honest with themselves they would figure out what is going on and do what they can to turn things around for themselves. I learned all this stuff while I was rookie driver at Western Express, a company that was always maligned online about how low their pay was. Ha! I made fifty grand my rookie year. There were several people who went through orientation with me who quit before three months had gone by - all of them blamed it on the really low pay they were getting. How can we say the company pays slave wages when I made far more than most rookie drivers do during their rookie year? You will always be the determining factor in your pay. All those people who write those horror stories about their lousy pay must own up to the fact that they didn't produce anywhere near what was necessary to earn a decent wage. That's the harsh truth about trucking. Unfortunately very few people own up to their responsibilities in this matter, it's far too easy to lay the blame on the lousy company. It's a total cop out as far as I'm concerned.

Actually, it's unfair to say there are consistent horror stories for EVERY company. There's no denying that CRST seems to be one of the companys with the MOST negative reviews about pay. You take a company like Millis for example...I haven't seen ONE bad thing said about rookie pay.

You can't prove to be productive if you are sitting for days waiting for loads. Dispatch there is known to be incompetent especially fill in ones. I don't hear this about Swift or USA Truck for other examples. What seems to be consistent at CRST is that hard working, ambitios drivers are willing to get things done and CRST does not give back the way they should.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Smart C.'s Comment
member avatar

Misunderstanding team pay is also a contributing factor in the bad pay horror stories. If the night driver is cranking out 650 miles a shift, and the day driver is cranking 450 miles, it looks lopsided--until you realize the day driver is not only dealing with traffic, but also bumping twice as many docks as the night person.

Each driver can feel cheated. "All he does is drive all night. He never has to deal with customers, drop and hooks or cranky customers. I even fuel more than him". While the other guy is saying "Come on...450 miles, he is slacking!"

One guy here bashed CRE team pay not realizing all miles are paid and split. No matter how we explained it, he insisted he would only make $750 per week average. And he didnt even work there yet, just bashed!!!

Yes. The split pay for teaming and the misconception that comes with it is a good point. But anytime I hear someone say "If you have bills to pay dont come here" (CRST) , I for the life of me, cannot determine what the pay really is.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

And you base all your information on what? Interviews with actual drivers? Internet "facts"?

Doug C.'s Comment
member avatar

Smart, thank you for the concern. Although money is always important, the opportunity to learn, for me anyway, is just as, if not more important than the pay rate.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Smart C said:

Actually, it's unfair to say there are consistent horror stories for EVERY company.

Uh, yeah every company has bad reviews and complainers.

There's no denying that CRST seems to be one of the companys with the MOST negative reviews about pay. You take a company like Millis for example...I haven't seen ONE bad thing said about rookie pay.

Most CRST complaints are about teaming in general from newbies who didnt know what they were getting into, or about the non compete clause of the contract they failed to read before signing. That says more about the drivers than the company.

And sorry, but it took me one search to find 5 poor pay reviews for Millis. So search and ye shall find.

You can't prove to be productive if you are sitting for days waiting for loads. Dispatch there is known to be incompetent especially fill in ones.

Please enlighten us on how long you sat waiting for loads. Give examples of how your dispatch was incompetent. Oh wait, you CAN'T because you still havent gotten a job yet.

I don't hear this about Swift or USA Truck for other examples. What seems to be consistent at CRST is that hard working, ambitios drivers are willing to get things done and CRST does not give back the way they should.

More rumor and baseless assertions with no experience at all. We have experienced CRST drivers on this forum who not only dispute this, but offered to answer any questions you have. Yet, you belittled them by saying "Im still trying Prime because they are a better company". Really??? How would you know? I love Prime but since I never worked for CRST i could not possibly make such an arrogant statement. Not to mention what is good to me is not good to you. the idea of whether a company is good is subjective. Every driver wants different things, so this is an unfair statement.

You have made statements regarding your poor work history including being terminated from a few "meaningless jobs". This is an example of a poor attitude that does not get things done out here.

Sorry, but what you "heard" has as much credibility as someone without a CDL passing judgement on companies that are well established and beloved by many.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Smart C.'s Comment
member avatar

Smart C said:

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Actually, it's unfair to say there are consistent horror stories for EVERY company.

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Uh, yeah every company has bad reviews and complainers.

double-quotes-start.png

There's no denying that CRST seems to be one of the companys with the MOST negative reviews about pay. You take a company like Millis for example...I haven't seen ONE bad thing said about rookie pay.

double-quotes-end.png

Most CRST complaints are about teaming in general from newbies who didnt know what they were getting into, or about the non compete clause of the contract they failed to read before signing. That says more about the drivers than the company.

And sorry, but it took me one search to find 5 poor pay reviews for Millis. So search and ye shall find.

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You can't prove to be productive if you are sitting for days waiting for loads. Dispatch there is known to be incompetent especially fill in ones.

double-quotes-end.png

Please enlighten us on how long you sat waiting for loads. Give examples of how your dispatch was incompetent. Oh wait, you CAN'T because you still havent gotten a job yet.

double-quotes-start.png

I don't hear this about Swift or USA Truck for other examples. What seems to be consistent at CRST is that hard working, ambitios drivers are willing to get things done and CRST does not give back the way they should.

double-quotes-end.png

More rumor and baseless assertions with no experience at all. We have experienced CRST drivers on this forum who not only dispute this, but offered to answer any questions you have. Yet, you belittled them by saying "Im still trying Prime because they are a better company". Really??? How would you know? I love Prime but since I never worked for CRST i could not possibly make such an arrogant statement. Not to mention what is good to me is not good to you. the idea of whether a company is good is subjective. Every driver wants different things, so this is an unfair statement.

You have made statements regarding your poor work history including being terminated from a few "meaningless jobs". This is an example of a poor attitude that does not get things done out here.

Sorry, but what you "heard" has as much credibility as someone without a CDL passing judgement on companies that are well established and beloved by many.

28 cents per mile compared to significantly more guaranteed at other companies like Prime and Millis is not subjective. Saying I was fired from a meaningless job (a job not related to trucking "many" years ago) is not having a bad attitude. Obviously (should be) I am not making my own judgements/conclusions based on experience, rather the opinions of those that actually have experience. So no, they are not "baseless assertations". I never belittled anyone concerning CRST vs Prime. I was asked whether or not I was still interested in Prime. I have talked to drivers who have worked at both companies.

Prime is usually proclaimed the better company. Am I not allowed to take this into consideration? My goodness...it doesn't make it an arrogant statement. Same thing with waiting for loads. CRST drivers have said (a lot) they have waited on loads. Prime drivers rejoice about consistent miles (a lot). But I guess I have to ignore that as well because if I don't, *I'M* making a *baseless* assertation?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar
But anytime I hear someone say "If you have bills to pay dont come here" (CRST) , I for the life of me, cannot determine what the pay really is.

So 7 hours ago you for the life of you "couldnt determine the pay", but now you know it is 28cpm?

I could find drivers at Prime who say they make $500,000 a year. It doesnt make it true. I know others who claim to only make $300 a week. The point is, your statements are only as reliable as rhe sources. And you have no credibility for your sources.

Drivers moan about EVERY company. That is the truth. Drivers will lie and exaggerate for the "woe is me, .my company is so bad and treated me horribly" sympathy. All you need do is look at YouTube and you will see that. We dont want that kind of negativity, especially when it comes from hearsey. If you had actual experience from CRST, then we could help you to increase your miles and get loads faster by encouraging you to contact your DM or planners etc. IF the allegations were true.

And YES, company appeal is subjective. You just made it clear you think Prime is better based on pay. I needed a place that would accept.my cat. So Prime was better than many others that do not have pet policies or only accept dogs. Prime could have paid 10cpm less and i would have thought they were great.

And like it or not, non drivimg jobs are important to companies. MOST students coming in only have non driving job experience. If this wasnt important, why place such an emphasis on work history? 3 years is needed due to 9/11, but what you did with those 3 years is a huge reflection of who and what you are as an employee. It shows your level.of commitment. If you hop from job to job, why would they want you? If you cant follow policy pushing a broom at a "meaningless job", then why would a company trust you with a $200k truck and possibly millions in freight? work ethic is what will determine ones success, not the company. You could make 44cpm at prime but if you suck and only get 1500 miles a week, you are less off than the guy getting 35cpm at 3000 miles at another company.

As far as waiting for loads, again..i can name dozens of prime drivers who complain about sitting hours and days for loads. And i guarantee i know A LOT more Prime drivers than you do. And miraculously.. it is always the complaining bum who gets the short loads, or waits, or gets loads with tons of time on them. Do you know why??? Because they suck and are always late. They are given loads of 400 miles for 2 days to make sure they will get there on time. They are the ones who take Ubers to go to malls and movies because they have enough time on a load they can get a 34, but then they leave too late cause they were winning at a casino and deliver an hour late.

Have you EVER met a driver say "Im a terrbile driver. I am always late and i annoy my FM". nope, never happened did it?

point being..what Old School said previosusly, and what we have said repeatedly on this forum: Trucking is about personal responsibility and commitment. if you produce you get the loads and the special treatment. If not, you will sit That is true for ANY company because the FMs want to keep the producers happy with the high miles.

Tyson (Trucker You Sittin Over Night) and other mear loads are notorious for making drivers wait. 30+ hours. When i get meat loads they are already late and loaded. I NEVER wait for a meat load unless my 70 clock is dead and they give me a 34 reset that way. In 2 years i sat for 2 meat loads for this reason. Go ask any other prime or reefer driver and they will tell you im full of crap. But when i screen shot them the load and then my depart times they are mystified. I get it done so i never wait.

This is what we keep trying to tell you.

At CRST it will be harder to adjust to trucking life because of the teaming issue. It is difficult to find partners of the same high calibur. That is not a CRST trait, that is a teaming trait.

When are you starting school?

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Smart C, our points always seem to go right over your head. If you'd take the time to actually listen to the few people you encounter who have had success at this, rather than always telling us about the people you've spoken with who failed and have aired all the complaints you list, you might gain a little understanding. You're so concerned with making sure you're right that you can't seem to learn anything.

The very beginning of knowledge starts with the assertion that you know nothing. You are trying to come from a position of knowing more than the people you seek knowledge from. Does that sound logical? You can't learn anything from people who have not done well at trucking, yet that's always the people you tell us you've spoken with.

We're obviously not going to be able to help you. You've already decided your own fate. We will be constantly challenging the nonsense you propagate though. Successful drivers laugh at assertions claiming that drivers are constantly waiting for loads because of incompetent dispatchers. That kind of comment tells us a lot.

Drivers are responsible for making sure their wheels are turning. They do this by developing trust, consistently getting things done, and effectively communicating their times of availability. It's always the worst drivers who are always pointing out the incompetence of the dispatchers. They never seem to realize that those same incompetent dispatchers are keeping other drivers consistently busy.

The fact that this business is really competitive has escaped you. All your information is skewed and based on what you've gleaned from the losers in the competition. Do you see how it has you focused on things outside your control for success? You're now focused on "the company." You've got to be focused on your effort - your performance, if you will. Success at trucking boils down to that.

I don't care if it says CRST, C.R. England, or Western Express on the doors of a truck - it means nothing as far as the driver's success goes. Each of those companies has very successful drivers working for them. You've got to figure out how they make it work while the others don't. Until you have that part figured out, you're going to be just like the drivers you love to quote. You're going to be blaming all your troubles at trucking on people who didn't have anything to do with your demise.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar
Drivers are responsible for making sure their wheels are turning. They do this by developing trust, consistently getting things done, and effectively communicating their times of availability. It's always the worst drivers who are always pointing out the incompetence of the dispatchers. They never seem to realize that those same incompetent dispatchers are keeping other drivers consistently busy.

Heres a perfect example of this. People complain about night and weekend dispatch, but i love them. I no longer ask for things. I tell them what i want because i can make both our lives easier.

I was headed to Ogden UT to deliver but a snow storm was coming in. I wanted to go back east and called night dispatch telling them to get me a load either out of the receiver or out of the terminal in SLC. I was shutting down at the terminal and getting a 34 regardless. I got a load to pick up from the terminal to PA. Shortly before that, dispatch put a load on me going over Donner Pass during a blizzard. That wasnt happening, and when i told the weekend guy, he removed it and gave me a load to FL.

Had I not asked for a load in Ogden UT or not refused the Donner Pass, i could have been sitting for days. But because I have established myself with all of dispatch, i am not "just a number". They know me and when they need a repower or they have a tight load no one else can take i do it for them. So i get what i want...and never sit. And they have a reliable driver who can make decisions that benefits both.

"Im running late on this load due to weather and shipper delays. How about i drop it at the terminal and you find me something out of there?" This helps dispatch. You are ensuring the load is on time by passing it to someone with a full clock and you are dropping it in a place with lots of available drivers making dispatches job easy.

These are proactive ways of getting your miles, instead of just sitting and waiting for a load. Ask for pre plans. Most drivers dont ask so the FMs are busy planning the ones who do. I ALWAYS have a preplan.

again, its all about the driver

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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