It's Not My Fault I Failed

Topic 24658 | Page 4

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Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Rainy nailed it when she described what I was talking about when I said there are other places that will tell you what you want to hear. I worded it that way carefully, because we get some people who have already decided they know the answers and they just want confirmation. When we tell them that the reality is different from their ideas they take it as an insult and insist that we're wrong and they're right.

PJ, unfortunately we don't ask for people's birth date when they register so I'm not sure how old people are unless they volunteer it. But without a doubt the average age of our moderators is in the 50's for sure.

The other side of the coin is a critical response to a sincere effort to understand with "pfft, you just don't understand." But for those who are truly trying to understand, maybe temper the tone a little.

So what you're saying is that we get people in here who are doing their best to understand what we're saying but when they don't get it right away we needlessly become harsh and critical? That may have happened, and if it did I would love the opportunity to apologize for it. So if you would be so kind and give us a link or two pointing to a couple of examples I would love to take the opportunity to apologize to the people we offended by being poor hosts. We're always trying to improve everything about ourselves and our website so I appreciate your efforts to point out some specific situations where we could have done better so we can learn from them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

PJ: I am also former military. USMC Reserves and 3 years active Army. Drove a tank M551 ARAAV (Sheridan) amphibious and air droppable (so they say). Considering trucking because the corporate world is just sucking the life out of me. Primarily the BS. Not afraid of hard work, but looking for something where I feel a sense of accomplishment and satisfaction.

Rainy D. is so nice!

BTW, in the Army we slept on a piece of plywood stretched across interior side walls of the tank.

I look forward to learning from you and the other experienced drivers on this forum.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
But without a doubt the average age of our moderators is in the 50's for sure.

Neither Rainy nor Susan are a day over 29 though, just saying...

Points fellas...big points.

smile.gif

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

Brett,

I'm not going to give specific examples, because I've actually begun to respect some of those people's wisdom and hope to learn more from them. So I don't want to start off bad by pointing specific fingers. Plus, I've got pretty thick skin. I'll survive. The scenarios that I have seen involve a exchange such as this:

New guy: I'm a weigh lifter so I can handle any strength requirements of truck driving. (attitude is intentional) Experience driver: I don't care how strong you are, you've never unfolded an 80 pound frozen tarp standing on metal covered with ice.

Both people have their points. The new guy is strong he's not afraid of physical challenges. He thinks he can handle the job. The experienced driver knows there's more to getting the job done than just brute strength. The experienced driver knows that you might want to put your tarps inside as soon as you arrive for pick up so they thaw out and are easier work with. The experienced driver may know of other ways to tarp a load without waking on ice covered loads.

I am learning a great deal from this forum. And I can tell you have put a lot of work into making this a great website. I only commented in response to Old School, because I see the exchanges and I can understand how the experienced drivers can become frustrated with know it all people who refuse to listen to reason. Old School has a background in business and from what I've gathered, some of his conversations with people about owner-operator are with people who don't know how to do a basic income and expense statement. So they think the $200,000 they make is all gravy. At the same time, I can also see how someone might view someone as critical because the experienced drivers are discounting a skill or talent that might actually contribute to becoming a successful driver. Turtle had a flooring business for 27 years and backed a trailer on a regular basis. From reading his experience at Prime training, this helped him with backing a 53' trailer. Yes the trailer is different, but apparently this experience helped him.

The biggest question that I have from all the experienced drivers that have been so helpful with their response to my comments is "when are you driving?" How can you respond so quickly when you're logging the miles?

Rob.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar
New guy: I'm a weigh lifter so I can handle any strength requirements of truck driving. (attitude is intentional) Experience driver: I don't care how strong you are, you've never unfolded an 80 pound frozen tarp standing on metal covered with ice.

Valid point. However, lifting weights is one thing. Lifting weights after 11 hours of driving in severe weather conditions that absolutely drain you physically and mentally after having to be constantly alert....especially at night...when new....it just seriously doesnt compare.

One power lifter told us he intended to go to the gym mon, wed ,fri for an hour a day. He insisted where there is a will there is a way. That is not realistic A woman told us she needs to start her day off every morning at 8am with a shower and she was bringing all.of her camping and cooking equipment on her trainers truck. Not happening. Yet another demanded to bring his dog to training. A former pilot said sleeper cabs are subhuman and any company he works for better pay for a hotel room every night.

Most new drivers are exhausted for at least the first few months without having to lift tarps. I can leg press 1200 pounds...no lie..and because of it driving a clutch never bothered me, not even in traffic. That doesnt mean handling the other aspects of driving was easy...and many people think because they can drive, workout, organize, etc...that they can do this. It isnt about one skill or.trait. Its about managing and balancing so mamy different issues at the same time.

My current trainee just said, "Driving is the easy part. It is the rest of the job that gets difficult."

Yet, we see so many people post "I graduated at the top of my CDL school class. Im a great trucker, and im going to find a company who pays me what im worth". But they dont realize the journey has just begun.

CDL School is like boot camp. Training is like OCS. Being a rookie is like a new infantryman on his first combat deployment. Everyone wants to stay away from him in the field cause he might get shot, or heck, might shoot you. When new drivers back into doors, other drivers point and laugh or sometimes get out to make sure their own truck doesnt get hit.

To answer your question, Im supposed to be sleeping right now, but my trainee is bouncing me around while driving Elk Mountain WY. i post when i cant sleep

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Hobo's Comment
member avatar

CDL School is like boot camp. Training is like OCS. Being a rookie is like a new infantryman on his first combat deployment. Everyone wants to stay away from him in the field cause he might get shot, or heck, might shoot you. When new drivers back into doors, other drivers point and laugh or sometimes get out to make sure their own truck doesnt get hit.

Actually, you don't stay away from the NUGs, you stay away from the 60 gunner and the RTO, and the guy walking next to the RTO...they're the ones most likely to buy it.

I don't mean to pick on you, I've only been a member here for 2 weeks but I've already read several comments like this. CDL school is not like boot camp, training is not like OCS, and being a rookie is without a doubt not even anything close to combat.

I understand that over 99% of the country hasn't served and I don't think less of them and I usually take comments like those as a compliment but there is such a thing as taking it too far. Truckers are not combat soldiers. I think describing trucking this way is counter-productive.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

CDL School is like boot camp. Training is like OCS. Being a rookie is like a new infantryman on his first combat deployment. Everyone wants to stay away from him in the field cause he might get shot, or heck, might shoot you. When new drivers back into doors, other drivers point and laugh or sometimes get out to make sure their own truck doesnt get hit.

double-quotes-end.png

Actually, you don't stay away from the NUGs, you stay away from the 60 gunner and the RTO, and the guy walking next to the RTO...they're the ones most likely to buy it.

I don't mean to pick on you, I've only been a member here for 2 weeks but I've already read several comments like this. CDL school is not like boot camp, training is not like OCS, and being a rookie is without a doubt not even anything close to combat.

I understand that over 99% of the country hasn't served and I don't think less of them and I usually take comments like those as a compliment but there is such a thing as taking it too far. Truckers are not combat soldiers. I think describing trucking this way is counter-productive.

Hobo what do you know first-hand about trucking school, road training and the first year of solo? Please, do tell...

I typically don’t compare trucking school to boot camp because I did not serve in the military. Thus I have no personal basis for such a comparison. However, while in trucking school I witnessed a half dozen former military, one of them supposedly a driver, flunk out.

So,...perhaps it’s nothing like boot camp, otherwise those 6 would be drivers by now. Stands to reason, right?

I maintain...it’s unlike anything most people have ever done, including you. Don’t underestimate it Hobo. Don’t, or you’ll likely fail.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Hobo's Comment
member avatar

G-Town, thank you for admitting that trucking isn't like the military. I'll take that and ignore the rest..you know, the part of your post where you tried to defend Rainy after first admitting you didn't know what you were talking about. I'll take your advice on trucking but save the catfish stuff for people who don't know better. You people need to stop comparing trucking to combat.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

G-Town, thank you for admitting that trucking isn't like the military. I'll take that and ignore the rest..you know, the part of your post where you tried to defend Rainy after first admitting you didn't know what you were talking about. I'll take your advice on trucking but save the catfish stuff for people who don't know better. You people need to stop comparing trucking to combat.

wtf-2.gif Oh smack...

I volunteer my time here Pup, I don’t need your baggage or your attitude.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Hobo's Comment
member avatar

I volunteer my time here Pup, I don’t need your baggage or your attitude.

I was thinking the same thing. A lot of your advice seems to be not trucking related. I'll take your advice on trucking but as far as the military...lick my sack.

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