Double Clutch Struggling In Lower Gears 2nd To 3rd And 3rd To 4th!

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Rekcurt9291 R.'s Comment
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My instructor telling me to shift at 1500rpm for 2nd to 3rd and 3rd to 4th gears, but when i try to release my clutch, i have to be really slow letting it go completely , like wait about 2 seconds(like about taking off from 2nd gear, we always start on 2nd gear when come to a complete stop). or if i let go of the clutch to soon the engine will sound like i am(downshifting & sound like engine breaking)

Is my RPM shifting is too high? or the problem is just in me. and i dont think he ever shift on 1500rpm on low gears.

He even told me to find someone with a manual transmission car and practice to it whenever im off from training. ' Does it really help practicing on a car?

I really feel down and frustrated right now.

Thank You for reading.!

Big T's Comment
member avatar

Might check to see if the engine brake is on.

In general the rule of thumb is out at 1500 and in around 1100 when up shifting. Opposite when down shifting.

It sounds like you have a timing issue. Listen to the Adam's family theme song. The snaps are almost a perfect timing for double clutching. Get a plunger next to a chair and pretend it is the stick. Then you can practice your timing with your left leg.

Most importantly take a breather and relax.

Another trick is to listen next time you're in the truck. What does it sound like when the instructor shifts. I have found a lot of my students were able to shift better when they started going by sound instead of watching the rpms.

Best of luck.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I was going to say a timing issue also. Don't get in a rush to shift. Just take your time and don't try to shift too quickly. It's easier to shift if the Jake is off also.

Shifting a car is much different than shifting a truck and often those who've never driven a manual transmission 4 wheeler will learn to double clutch a truck transmission easier than those who have.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

I think nowadays many companies will put you in an automatic if they think you are having trouble with shifting a manual and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. One guy in my class wanted a manual but got assigned an automatic. So he said to look on the bright side. If his left leg was ever amputated he could still drive. Talk about a positive attitude!

Rekcurt9291 R.'s Comment
member avatar

Might check to see if the engine brake is on.

In general the rule of thumb is out at 1500 and in around 1100 when up shifting. Opposite when down shifting.

It sounds like you have a timing issue. Listen to the Adam's family theme song. The snaps are almost a perfect timing for double clutching. Get a plunger next to a chair and pretend it is the stick. Then you can practice your timing with your left leg.

Most importantly take a breather and relax.

Another trick is to listen next time you're in the truck. What does it sound like when the instructor shifts. I have found a lot of my students were able to shift better when they started going by sound instead of watching the rpms.

Best of luck.

I will be checking the engine brake if its on next time.

If im shifting around 1100 rpm everythings is okay. and if shifting 1500rpm have to release the clutch veryvery slowly(sometimes wait for the truck to slowdown a little) to be smooth or else if i release it too soon i can hear the engine sound high rpm and the truck will slow down . I can get in to gears smoothly. the issue starts when letting go of the clutch. do you think i still have timing issues? When instructor shifts RPMs sounds low doesnt go high like 1500. When listening engine sound shifting at 1500rpm doesnt sound right.

Thanks!

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Next time you're driving, tell your instructor you think you may have figured out your problem and you're going to try something a bit different. Then do it the way you think you should be doing it and see what happens. If it shifts better, great! If not, keep working on it.

What's strange is that the way you're describing it you either have a synchronized transmission or you're picking up speed after you're putting it in gear. If you're shifting while going up or down hill that's going to change things a lot. If you're using a synchronized transmission it's going to go into gear even if the RPM's don't match the road speed very well but the engine will react harshly when you disengage the clutch.

Are you on a hill when you're shifting, or are you using a synchronized transmission?

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Brett, when you say “synchronized transmission” are you talking about an automatic or is there a synchronized tranny that still has a clutch?????

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

All four wheelers with standard transmissions are synchronized transmissions. Because of this, the transmission can put into any gear at any speed. But when you let the clutch out the engine will then attach to the driveline again and if your gear selection and road speed don't match very well the engine can either lug or rev really high.

Big Rig transmissions are not synchronized. You have to do that yourself, which is why you double clutch. But even with double clutching , in a big rig your engine speed, road speed, and gear selection must all match or you won't be able to get it into gear.

The way he's describing it he says,

"I can get in to gears smoothly. the issue starts when letting go of the clutch. If I release it too soon i can hear the engine sound high rpm and the truck will slow down"

That is a bit confusing. If the engine is actually revving when he lets out the clutch it makes me think he's either accelerating down a hill with the clutch pushed in or he's using a synchronized transmission or something. But he also says, "sound like engine braking" which obviously means the Jake Brake is coming on above a certain RPM, which is why the truck is slowing.

So I'm not sure exactly what's going on. If we could watch him we'd figure it out in two seconds. He could very well just have the Jake on and it's kicking in above a certain RPM. So the engine may not actually be revving when he lets the clutch out, it's just simply engaging the Jake Brake.

We'll see if the problem goes away when he turns the Jake Brake off. It likely will.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

This is definitely confusing. I’m in an AMT now but when I was in a manual I never had the Jake on when upshifting or downshifting. So I hope we can get to the bottom of this mystery and clear up any confusion

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Yeah the revving thing sounds a little weird. What kind of truck are you driving? I ask because when I trained in a Cascadia the shifting point was either 1200 or 1300 rpm, I can't remember which. Nice and smooth. Of course that may be specific to our truck and transmission setup. Yours may be different. 1500 still sounds high to me.

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