Double Clutch Struggling In Lower Gears 2nd To 3rd And 3rd To 4th!

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Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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Yeah the revving thing sounds a little weird. What kind of truck are you driving? I ask because when I trained in a Cascadia the shifting point was either 1200 or 1300 rpm, I can't remember which. Nice and smooth. Of course that may be specific to our truck and transmission setup. Yours may be different. 1500 still sounds high to me.

My trainer has a 2019. 1500 for upshifting and 1000 for down. 800 to shift down 2.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

Yeah the revving thing sounds a little weird. What kind of truck are you driving? I ask because when I trained in a Cascadia the shifting point was either 1200 or 1300 rpm, I can't remember which. Nice and smooth. Of course that may be specific to our truck and transmission setup. Yours may be different. 1500 still sounds high to me.

double-quotes-end.png

My trainer has a 2019. 1500 for upshifting and 1000 for down. 800 to shift down 2.

Downshifting while climbing a hill is 1100 by the way.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
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Unfortunately, we would have to see you shifting to be able to help as the way it is described is a little confusing. Are you hitting the throttle when taking it out of gear?

Old School's Comment
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I honestly can't tell what's going on by the description. The whole idea of letting the clutch out slowly is foreign when double clutching. You should just be sort of double tapping the clutch pedal a couple of inches at max. If you're upshifting there's no need to let it out slowly. That truck has it's own momentum, and the way those transmissions are designed you shouldn't need to coax it by feathering the clutch after you're rolling. All your descriptions of engine sounds make me think the Jake's are engaged which will make it really difficult to shift for an inexperienced driver.

I'm hoping you can try to explain it better, because the description of what's happening is very confusing to me.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I honestly can't tell what's going on by the description. The whole idea of letting the clutch out slowly is foreign when double clutching. You should just be sort of double tapping the clutch pedal a couple of inches at max. If you're upshifting there's no need to let it out slowly. That truck has it's own momentum, and the way those transmissions are designed you shouldn't need to coax it by feathering the clutch after you're rolling. All your descriptions of engine sounds make me think the Jake's are engaged which will make it really difficult to shift for an inexperienced driver.

I'm hoping you can try to explain it better, because the description of what's happening is very confusing to me.

As OS and others said, it sounds like the engine or Jake brake is on, or you are revving the engine when upshifting or as you let the clutch out. And as OS said, you should only be easing the clutch out when starting from a stop, and don't give it fuel until the clutch is out and it starts inching forward. Don't give it any fuel as you let the clutch out in any gear, for that matter, the clutch should be out as you start to apply the fuel pedal.

There are plenty of youtube videos on shifting, check some out.

And as my trainer kept telling me (rather forcefully) USE THE TACH TO SHIFT!!!

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

Make sure that you are not pushing the clutch in too far. A tiny depression clutching out of gear then a tiny depression clutching into gear does the trick. You only need push the clutch in far (to the floor) if you're at a dead stop and it won't go into 1st or 2nd otherwise. Also, make sure you're getting completely off the fuel while shifting, albeit very briefly.

Once you get the hang of it, you may find that you don't really need to clutch at all, especially in high range.

Practicing in a car (with a synchronized trans) is useless.

If you're having trouble making the small depression, you might want to try putting the seat back further and/or up higher.

You'll need to develop a feel for what works best (rpm, shifting speed) under varying conditions of weight, road speed, and terrain. Shifting going uphill @79,999lbs is a lot different than level ground @50,000.

Some have suggested shifting slowly. This may vary with the truck, trans, rears, etc. I've used 9 spds, 10 spds, and now a 13 EF with a Cummins ISX15. I don't remember too much what the others were like, but my current ride doesn't like dawdling...prefers quick shifts, especially if heavy and/or uphill.

My instructor telling me to shift at 1500rpm for 2nd to 3rd and 3rd to 4th gears, but when i try to release my clutch, i have to be really slow letting it go completely , like wait about 2 seconds(like about taking off from 2nd gear, we always start on 2nd gear when come to a complete stop). or if i let go of the clutch to soon the engine will sound like i am(downshifting & sound like engine breaking)

Is my RPM shifting is too high? or the problem is just in me. and i dont think he ever shift on 1500rpm on low gears.

He even told me to find someone with a manual transmission car and practice to it whenever im off from training. ' Does it really help practicing on a car?

I really feel down and frustrated right now.

Thank You for reading.!

Alli's Comment
member avatar

Are you empty or loaded? Your truck might have more power than you can "handle" at lower gears. I say this because I recently ran into a "similar" problem when I changed companies. My new truck has nearly 600hp which is a far cry from whatever barebones generic Cascadia engines I had previously. Even when fully loaded at 92k (permitted - grain truck) I have to skip lower gears when taking off. Try shifting at lower RPM. I wouldn't suggest skipping gears if you are just learning yet. Experiment with shifting around 1400rpm and see if that makes any difference.

But first, make sure your engine brake is off and you aren't accidentally keeping your foot on the accelerator when you shift. Some trucks are touchier than others. Make sure you're shifting in a steady rhythm and aren't rushing it or taking it too slowly.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Are you empty or loaded? Your truck might have more power than you can "handle" at lower gears. I say this because I recently ran into a "similar" problem when I changed companies. My new truck has nearly 600hp which is a far cry from whatever barebones generic Cascadia engines I had previously. Even when fully loaded at 92k (permitted - grain truck) I have to skip lower gears when taking off. Try shifting at lower RPM. I wouldn't suggest skipping gears if you are just learning yet. Experiment with shifting around 1400rpm and see if that makes any difference.

But first, make sure your engine brake is off and you aren't accidentally keeping your foot on the accelerator when you shift. Some trucks are touchier than others. Make sure you're shifting in a steady rhythm and aren't rushing it or taking it too slowly.

Too much power? Barebones engines? The newer fleet trucks have engines at or near 500HP. Not too shabby and plenty of ponies to move a loaded truck, maintaining highway speeds.

Horsepower has little to do with shifting.

Depends on gear ratios; both transmission and drive axle in combination with engine RPM and road speed. The torque produced at a specific RPM is what will move the truck from a dead stop through to operating speed quicker. Let’s not confuse him with things that have nothing todo with shifting efficiently.

I do however agree the jake might be on, or more likely he is pushing the clutch in too far, engaging the clutch brake. That will foul a shift like nothing else and is a common mistake for entry level drivers. Like Old School said; tapping the clutch while double clutching/shifting is all that is necessary.

Practice and experience will overcome the issue far quicker than any technical explanation.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

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