24 Hour Or 21 Hour Cycles

Topic 25074 | Page 2

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Splitter's Comment
member avatar

My FM had me running recaps for almost 3 weeks straight. Its easier on the body for sure. I'd run 8.5-9.5 hour days. Never ran out of hours. Personally, I run out 11 hour clock as much as possible. Anything can happen & screw up anyone's day/night. Especially with winter driving. I know they can reschedule but it's like Old School said, if I'm there early & the receivers will take me (which they have) then I'm set up to make more money that week.

I had a great opportunity to make my first check over $2K but I couldn't get unloaded early. That load had 1700 miles on it. The next one had like 2400 but because I couldn't get unloaded earlier, I didn't have to hours to get the second load in on time.

My FM had me drop it at a terminal. I was still able to clear $1700 because of running hard with another couple of loads I was given.

So for me, like I said, I prefer to run miles but when there's opportunity to learn another way, like running recaps, then I'm all in. Still haven't needed to run 8/2 splits for an extend run but have used it a few times.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Sometimes it is about the customers. We have a few that only accept certain loads at certain hours so midnight to 6am is frozen, 6am to noon is produce, then meat and so on.

if you get delayed, or even if the trip is too far, you may need to wait until tge next window for their appts.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

There are times when those "cycles" can be even shorter. Example:

Start your day at 00:00 on 03/30

On duty for 7 hours.

No new pre plan

Go off duty at 07:00

10 hour break

New 14 hour clock at 17:00 on 03/30

Total 17 hours

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Math check?

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

Math check?

Check it for me.

smile.gif

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Math check?

double-quotes-end.png

Check it for me.

smile.gif

I did with your example, and I saw 14 hours....

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
I did with your example, and I saw 14 hours....

????????

Start at midnight........on duty for 7 hours..........10 hour break........10+7=17

Looks like good math to me!

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I was going by useable hours, without the 10 hour break figured in which would be 14. smile.gif

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

Tractor Man,

I had thought about "short haul" situation as well. If, as in your example, I came off a 10 hour, at 0:00 drove 5 hours for 6:00 delivery, then go off duty at 7:00, I'm going to be staring at the top bunk for a while rather than sleeping cause I woke up at 23:30 the night before.

That part doesn't concern me as much. At different periods in my life, I have had trouble sleeping. So it is not uncommon for me to get only a few hours of sleep one night and then sleep really deep the next night.

All of the comments have been helpful. Old School's quote of Turtle helped a lot: work with my FM. I won't know what works best for me until I try. In fact, that might be a good conversation to have with my FM. Run me recaps for a month, then burn my 70 in 6 days for the next month. So long as I'm logging my miles and getting the loads there safely and on time (and making money for Prime), I hoping that they will work with me.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Honestly, the HOS is hard to understand unless you do it. Yes, we as experienced drivers can tell you we run it in hard and push ourselves, and make good money. That doesn't mean you will make nothing if you cannot do that.

400 miles (7 to 8 hours of driving) x 7 days a week is 2800 miles. that is a decent number of miles for anyone.

Dry van at 35cpm x 2800 is $980

Reefer at 44cpm x 2800 is $1272

Primes lightweight 49cpm x 2800 is $1372

That is good money for people jist coming out of training. $45k to $60k for a newbie???

And it takes time to learn how to manage your time and trip plan to make yourself available for loads. That is what your first year is all about, that steep learning curve. Dispatch knows this, and will only give you what you can handle. You can ask them how to improve.

What many people dont understand is that the communication with dispatch isnt just about "push me hard". It can also be "hey i need sleep, give me an extra 10 hours or let me have a big window on my load to pick up".

Also, my FM has 100 drivers. He isn't watching my miles he is seeing how much i have available on my 70. So he givee me miles i can run with my clock. if i tell him "theres no way i can get to that appointment please move it" he will or will give me another load.

every single one of us runs our trucks differently and each thonks our way is best. A new driver will take advice from various drivers and concoct their own way of doing things. It isnt right or wrong, it is what works for you.

So instead of making spreadsheets about trip planning before one even starts school, get working on the high road and pretrip

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More