24 Hour Or 21 Hour Cycles

Topic 25074 | Page 1

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Rob D.'s Comment
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I understand that HOS "allow" 14 hours of on-duty time followed by 10 hours off-duty before returning to on-duty time. So in theory you would be operating on a 24 hour "cycle." HOS also limit you to 11 hours of driving in 14 hours. But if you do nothing but drive for 11 hours, you could "compress" the 24 hour cycle to 21 hours (11 hours driving; 10 hours off-duty). Do trip planners attempt to "compress" schedules to a 21 hour "cycle"?

For example a load going 1500 miles and assuming that 500 miles covered per day.

If you pick up at 8:00 a.m. Monday, is it typical that you would deliver at 8:00 a.m. Thursday?

Or do trip planners try to compress the schedule so tight that you pick up at 8:00 a.m. Monday and deliver at 1:00 a.m. Thursday?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

It's unlikely a planner will purposely schedule something that tight. There are far too many variables that can slow a driver down. However, there will be times when a planner has a load that needs to get somewhere in X amount of time, and you may be the only driver in the area that has the hours to do it. So they'll give it to you in hopes that you'll make it.

In time, they also learn the HOS habits of each individual driver, and plan loads accordingly. For example, more often than not I compress my days the way you describe. Thus, I often get loads that require me to do so.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sid V.'s Comment
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The mega carriers all use computers to figure that stuff out.

Once reason I don't miss about company driving is that they shorten the trips up. I had about 3 hour leeway on 1k mile trips. Basically, nothing can go wrong.

Turtle's Comment
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Once reason I don't miss about company driving is that they shorten the trips up. I had about 3 hour leeway on 1k mile trips.

That's how they maximize efficiency and productivity, both of which are reflected in my profit, and the company's. I, for one, like getting as much done as possible, in the shortest amount of time possible.

Basically, nothing can go wrong.

But if it does, a simple phone call will reschedule and clear me of any fault.

Old School's Comment
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In time, they also learn the HOS habits of each individual driver, and plan loads accordingly. For example, more often than not I compress my days the way you describe. Thus, I often get loads that require me to do so.

This is what you want to take away from this conversation. It's certainly been my experience. I compress my days, I flip my nights and days, I do whatever it takes to get the most accomplished.

I remember once stopping to do a 34 even though I had hours enough to drive. The customer couldn't receive me if I arrived early, because they were closed for some type of emergency situation. Our terminal manager called me and wanted to know why I wasn't moving. I explained it all, and even shared with him how this would set me up with available hours for a particular load that I was familiar with going out next week. He insisted I keep moving. When we got off the phone I stayed with my plan. And sure enough the planners knew I would manage things the way I did because they put that really nice load on me. (That manager ended up being replaced.)

Communicating well with your dispatcher can really help to establish your tendencies and habits as a driver also. My dispatcher often seems to know what I'll do in any situation. He and I have worked together for almost six years now. It's one of the benefits of establishing yourself somewhere, and sticking with your employer. There's way more money to be made where you are a well known driver who gets things accomplished than always chasing after a few more CPM and a "sign on bonus."

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

A lot is making sense now about "wash, rinse, repeat," "you barely have time to eat," etc. And maybe why your first six months is so hard. First you really don't know what you're doing (driving, navigation, traffic management, time management, etc.). Second, your load schedule will be based upon the computer load plan model, rather than your HOS habits (because you don't have any yet). Because that load plan model involves a very tight schedule, you can't really expect any "break time" other than your required 30 minutes and 10 hour break. So to get more "break time" you have to try to "beat the computer load plan model." Also, because a compressed schedule does not sync with a 24 hour clock, your sleep schedule progressively shifts.

Old School's comment about his 70 hours got me thinking about this:

They will burn up my 70 in six days typically

So to get through this as a new driver, do you 1) embrace the suck and 2) prove to your FM that you can manage 2500 to 3000 miles per week (or more) without using the computer load planning model?

Thanks for all the comments and thanks to all the experienced drivers for their patience.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
So to get through this as a new driver, do you 1) embrace the suck and 2) prove to your FM that you can manage 2500 to 3000 miles per week (or more) without using the computer load planning model?

For me there's no embracing the suck. I love the challenges this career offers. I'm geared toward productivity. Beating out my competitors and getting the most done possible is both my driving force and my reward. I love getting things done. It doesn't matter to me that I work crazy hours. I never even think about any computer models. If it says the load should be there Tuesday morning, I'm on the phone with that customer saying, "I can be there Monday afternoon, can you guys unload me right at quitting time?" If the answer is yes, my next phone call is to my dispatcher telling him, "Hey, I'm going to be MT Monday afternoon, see what you can come up with. I'll have enough hours to pick something up before I need to take my 10."

I love operating that way, they love it, and we never even think about computer models. I seriously am hard wired like this. I do it to stay ahead of the pack, I'm constantly working on getting better at my time management and productivity. I really don't focus on the money, but it always follows when you focus on productivity.

How To Get Dispatched 5,000 Miles in One Week

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Avvatar's Comment
member avatar

1) embrace the suck

I haven't heard that in a while. I'd forgotten how much I love that phrase. Thanks for the trip down memory lane.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Frankly if I’m out on the road, I would rather be as busy as possible, rather than sitting killing time in a truck stop or something.

I stopped on the way home for breakfast, and saw three truckers sitting there when I came in, and I had a leisurely meal, some my 70 was almost used up and all I could do was go home.

They were still there when I left, and I was wondering how they found the time. Though to be fair maybe they were on their 10 or 34.

I am usually driving my clock out or as close as I can get and still find parking, eating a microwave meal and going to sleep, then waiting for my 10 to end so I can pretrip and go the next morning.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

First it depends on the company, load, type of freight, your available hours and more when you are planed. Second, out here there is no more 24 hour day. Example you start with a fresh 70 hour clock. It will just about use up your 14 to drive 11 hours. So, let's say you start your clock at midnight and drive until 11 am. At 9pm you can roll. You can start your clock twice in a 24 hour period. I usually plan myself for a 12 hour break. I get plenty of miles and like running on recaps.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

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