Driving Jobs Other Than OTR

Topic 25226 | Page 1

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John B.'s Comment
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For a good while I've wanted to get my CDL , but I'm not interested in being a OTR driver. What I've thought about is driving for MoDot or the railroad they always have jobs that require a CDL. But what are other options to consider for driving job?

I've studied for CDL but not sure I'm ready to take written test just yet

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I run linehaul which tends to be one of the higher paying jobs in trucking and I am home everynight, there is P&D , running shuttles, or even spotting which may not require a CDL if you do not leave the yard.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Old School's Comment
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John, if you're genuinely interested in a local type job, I highly recommend you at least make a commitment to doing over the road for one year to build a foundation for your career. It's very difficult starting out local - mostly because they generally require a minimum of one year of experience. I don't have the time right now to go into all the reasons behind this, but if you'll read this article I think it will help you understand how best to start this career.

Why You Should Not Start Your Trucking Career As A Local Driver

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rob T.'s Comment
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Where abouts do you live? that will play a big role in what's available. I've done food service work, which is physically unloading a trailer. I could work 12 hours but only drive 2 hours total. Currently I work for a grocery chain delivering to Iowa and the 7 surrounding states. A lot more driving involved in this position. Foodservice I stayed out overnight twice in a year and half I was there due to going to Omaha with bad weather(I'm in des moines). My current gig I've been out twice overnight in the 2 and half months. Once due to weather (heavy wind), the other time shipper I was picking up a backhaul from took too long and had to shutdown hour and a half from home.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Solo's Comment
member avatar

My roommate during my CDL training immediately left upon completion of our training and got a local job delivering beer for $190/day. Done by 230p Mon-Fri, though he said it's tough work, a trade-off he's willing to make to be home and not OTR.

So while a lot of people will say it's hard to land a local job, it's not impossible. He literally had no experience and was hired in 3 days and is happy that he took the chance despite being told that everyone local wants experience. What he has found is that everyone may say they want experience, but they really want somebody with a current/clean CDL.

Your mileage may vary, but the only way you'll find out is by asking.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Old school is spot on about local jobs being tough for a rookie. I started that way and feel fortunate i didnt hit anything given some of the situations i got myself into. I'd really suggest sucking it up for a year, you will then have a ton of jobs you're qualified for and wont need to just take anything. Solo, to be honest $190 a day for that work Is terrible. Obviously he felt it worked better for him to do it but unloading cases and kegs of beer all day for $190 regardless if you work 8 or 14 hours?no thanks. I did food service and made about 85k my first year. In the end I decided even that money wasn't worth it and found something easier on the body making similar money. The company I'm with now doesnt hire people without atleast a year experience.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Also, there are a ton of flatbed companies that will get you home nearly every weekend. You'll bust your ass all week but atleast you have consistent home time.

John B.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all the replies. I defintley will think about and weigh the options on local or OTR. I mean I'd rather not do OTR , but if it gets me experience then I'll do it.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Solo wrote in reference to his friend delivering beer locally:

What he has found is that everyone may say they want experience, but they really want somebody with a current/clean CDL.

...that is what your friend found to be true? How many places.

Perhaps for the company he is working for, but not so for the majority of local CDL A work being advertised.

To reiterate: local work is best performed by a more experienced hand and NOT by an entry-level driver.

Solo we have seen countless examples of newbies taking-on local work an quickly failing. Your friend is the exception to the rule.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

...and one additional point I failed to mention:

Most of the time 1-2 years of experience is required because of insurance. Be very careful, a local company could be carrying you on their policy without their insurance company knowing it, thus raising their rates. It’s the very reason why many times it once and done; one accident even a very minor one, termination is likely.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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