Railroad Crossings

Topic 25234 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Today I had to drive almost all day on some narrow two lane roads to get to a delivery and back out. On Hwy 28 in Illinois, I came up to a RR crossing that was elevated. I stopped before the crossing and wondered if I could cross it without my landing gear catching on the rails. I opened my window so I could hear any scraping and proceeded at a snails pace. Fortunately everything including the trailer skirts cleared, but just barely. Has anybody damaged a landing gear on tracks like this?

Do you veterans have any advice about this type of situation?

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Watch for warning signs posted about those “low trailer clearances”. Another tip-off would be seeing any past drag marks and scrapes on either side of the crossings. The rougher the crossing, the slower you should proceed. In my experience, if it is a legal truck route, there are no issues. Some side roads and driveways into a shipper/receiver will be exceptions, though. My GPS gives a warning alert near any low clearance spots. When in doubt don’t cross, and never, ever stop on those tracks. Lots of YouTube videos of vehicles taken out at RR crossings for a variety of reasons. **Spoiler Alert** The train ALWAYS wins!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Forgot to mention this : crank that landing gear ALL the way up. Don’t get lazy and only do 30 cranks when it takes 40 cranks. Some day it will cause you grief.

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

Also, sliding the tandems all the way forward will help too. Delivered to a Walmart store in PA that if you didn't slide the tandems, them skirts were gonna break. The pitch of the slope as you backed into the dock was not 53' friendly. Many victims scrape marks on the concrete as Packrat mentioned about approaching the RR tracks.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

And if you ever get stuck on the tracks make sure to call the number listed or the local police right away since you never know if the tracks are live tracks or not.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Splitter and Jamie, great points. I had never thought of either things you mentioned. You may have saved a life with that advice.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Splitter wrote:

Also, sliding the tandems all the way forward will help too. Delivered to a Walmart store in PA that if you didn't slide the tandems, them skirts were gonna break. The pitch of the slope as you backed into the dock was not 53' friendly. Many victims scrape marks on the concrete as Packrat mentioned about approaching the RR tracks.

Keep in mind that sliding the tandems in the “1” hole may not be practical and in many north eastern states not legal because of overhang compliance >13.5’ from the center of the rear axle or tandem center depending on the in use. MD, CT & NJ enforce this, so use discretion when choosing to operate with the tandems set all the way forward.

Curious about the PA Walmart comment Splitter... I’ve delivered to every Pennsylvania Walmart store and Sam’s east of Harrisburg and never once encountered what you described. Do you recall the location of the store? (Thx)

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

And if you ever get stuck on the tracks make sure to call the number listed or the local police right away since you never know if the tracks are live tracks or not.

One minor correction. If you ever get stuck on the tracks, GET THE HELL OUT OF THE TRUCK

THEN, call the phone number!

shocked.pngrofl-3.gif

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More