Log Violation.

Topic 25361 | Page 2

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Army guesses right...

...... I will make a guess here, Grumpy did you do a PRETRIP on the tractor after you moved it to get the trailer and you pre tripped them together? Please don't think of my question as highlighting a mistake, just trying to understand. Thanks

That seems to be the case. No one thinks you are highlighting a mistake. It’s a learning process for all of us. No worries and I sincerely doubt Grumpy will take offense to your inquiry.

Safe travels. Peace.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Army guesses right...

double-quotes-start.png

...... I will make a guess here, Grumpy did you do a PRETRIP on the tractor after you moved it to get the trailer and you pre tripped them together? Please don't think of my question as highlighting a mistake, just trying to understand. Thanks

double-quotes-end.png

That seems to be the case. No one thinks you are highlighting a mistake. It’s a learning process for all of us. No worries and I sincerely doubt Grumpy will take offense to your inquiry.

Safe travels. Peace.

No, no offense at all.

Did you miss my reply, GTown? I had a question for you on the previous page.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I will make mistakes for sure, no need to take offense.

I was going to post my last two, but decided to do a first 30 day update in a few days.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
I will make mistakes for sure, no need to take offense.

That is one of the things I like most about this forum. Many people are able to learn from a mistake one individual made. When somebody says what another person did wrong it allows everyone, rookie and experienced drivers alike, to learn a lesson without actually experiencing the problem. Sometimes a mistake is admitted, and other times somebody sees something that is a problem although the person who posted doesnt. Example I've used a few times is when Danielsahn first started flatbed he posted a picture of his first load. Of course we were excited with him, but Turtle also immediately noticed it wasn't secured properly so he used that moment to educate despite it not being obvious to many of us. You're doing a great job Grumpy, keep it up!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Don's Comment
member avatar

Like G-town, I pretrip the tractor for 15 minutes, then drive to our drop lot. I pre-trip the trailer and note such in the comments.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Like G-town, I pretrip the tractor for 15 minutes, then drive to our drop lot. I pre-trip the trailer and note such in the comments.

I normally do the same, except I usually don’t bother logging the trailer pretrip. I was wondering if it is required by DOT.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Phoenix's Comment
member avatar
I normally do the same, except I usually don’t bother logging the trailer pretrip. I was wondering if it is required by DOT.

Do what you log; log what you do. Anything else is falsification of logs.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I normally do the same, except I usually don’t bother logging the trailer pretrip. I was wondering if it is required by DOT.

double-quotes-end.png

Do what you log; log what you do. Anything else is falsification of logs.

What I meant was, I’ll show on duty for a drop and hook , and when I do I also pretrip/post trip, I just don’t specifically log a pretrip/post trip.

Maybe use the second remarks column for the pretrip/post trip part, or does it have to be a separate entry?

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Grumpy wants to know...

Did you miss my reply, GTown? I had a question for you on the previous page.

Sorry, must have missed it.

As a general rule, if on-duty I log what I am doing. That keeps me compliant no matter what.

As far a DOT? At least for the first trailer I get in the morning, not logging the PTI is likely okay. Our terminal nanagement requires that we note the trailer PTI as a separate step because they know the process and want to see that it was actually done.

When changing trailers I definitely think DOT wants to see the additional PTI because it requires an edit to the trip load tab for adding the second and at times third trailer.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Grumpy wants to know...

double-quotes-start.png

Did you miss my reply, GTown? I had a question for you on the previous page.

double-quotes-end.png

Sorry, must have missed it.

As a general rule, if on-duty I log what I am doing. That keeps me compliant no matter what.

As far a DOT? At least for the first trailer I get in the morning, not logging the PTI is likely okay. Our terminal nanagement requires that we note the trailer PTI as a separate step because they know the process and want to see that it was actually done.

When changing trailers I definitely think DOT wants to see the additional PTI because it requires an edit to the trip load tab for adding the second and at times third trailer.

Interesting. I’m going to have to ask logs what our policy is.

My trainer was a stickler for keeping logs current and correct, but he never logged a pre or post trip other than the truck and trailer at start and end of day. He did insist I DO a pre and post trip if we switched trailers, we just never logged anything other than a drop/hook.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

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