Truck Crash Colorado - With Videos

Topic 25387 | Page 6

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Old School's Comment
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Bird, you can be sure the company training he received will be scrutinized. Every angle will be covered in this catastrophe. The driver will be punished with prison time, but the lawyers will be turning over every stone to find where there might be some money available to them. Some insurance company is going to have a big problem on their hands over this one.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
The driver had to use an interpreter at his first court hearing. He does not speak, nor can he read English.

Oh...... That's convenient!?

391.11 General qualifications of drivers. (a) A person shall not drive a commercial motor vehicle unless he/she is qualified to drive a commercial motor vehicle. Except as provided in § 391.63, a motor carrier shall not require or permit a person to drive a commercial motor vehicle unless that person is qualified to drive a commercial motor vehicle.

(b) Except as provided in subpart G of this part, a person is qualified to drive a motor vehicle if he/she -

(1) Is at least 21 years old;

(2) Can read and speak the English language sufficiently to converse with the general public, to understand highway traffic signs and signals in the English language, to respond to official inquiries, and to make entries on reports and records

(The above regulation continues on. I stopped at the end of the relevant portion.)

If it's true that the driver neither spoke or read english, that is going to open another can of worms. In my short lived experience, he isn't the only one out here. I've always wondered how strictly the law is enforced on that one. Obviously ways around it.

Commercial Motor Vehicle:

A commercial motor vehicle is any vehicle used in commerce to transport passengers or property with either:

  • A gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more
  • A gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more which includes a towed unit with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds
Old School's Comment
member avatar

In Texas you can get a CDL manual in Spanish. Down in South Texas the signs at the weigh stations are in both Spanish and English. I've always thought that was odd, but it's difficult down there to know for sure which side of the border you're on. I bought a truck for my former business down in Brownsville, TX years ago. There was maybe one person at the dealer that spoke English. After we made the deal I went to the local Wendy's for some lunch and the menu was in Spanish! No English - I had to point to the pictures to order my hamburger!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

I recently spoke with a Canadian driver who owned his small company and employed other drivers. He said there was a recent change in the Canadian training and qualification requirements. I can’t remember exactly everything he mentioned, but it sounded like federally mandated and strict standards to obtain a CDL up there. Maybe Canada is doing what Old School predicted could eventually happen in the U.S.

Anybody know more about the Canadian rules currently?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Every load I have had so far has been 40k and up. And I’m scared spit-less going down mountains in Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. I would probably have a heart attack in the western mountains.

The ones I go down I rarely need brakes, I just use the jake, and occasionally touch the brakes a little.

But like Old School said, I see trucks pass me flying down and it makes me wonder if I am just overly cautious or are they being reckless.

PlanB's Comment
member avatar

No such thing as overly cautious. Your doing the right thing.

My personal goal is to never need to touch the service brake on a decent. I get my speed under control at the top of the hill and decend with engine break only. Ignore all those other fools bombing the hill, they'll never be able to stop or slow if there's a problem ahead. You've got your rig completely under control.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

No such thing as overly cautious. Your doing the right thing.

My personal goal is to never need to touch the service brake on a decent. I get my speed under control at the top of the hill and decend with engine break only. Ignore all those other fools bombing the hill, they'll never be able to stop or slow if there's a problem ahead. You've got your rig completely under control.

Sort of. I’ll explain in my first 30 day post.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

In Texas you can get a CDL manual in Spanish. Down in South Texas the signs at the weigh stations are in both Spanish and English. I've always thought that was odd, but it's difficult down there to know for sure which side of the border you're on. I bought a truck for my former business down in Brownsville, TX years ago. There was maybe one person at the dealer that spoke English. After we made the deal I went to the local Wendy's for some lunch and the menu was in Spanish! No English - I had to point to the pictures to order my hamburger!

Well. So much for rules and regulations and laws. What a crock! Welcome to America 2019?!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
But like Old School said, I see trucks pass me flying down and it makes me wonder if I am just overly cautious or are they being reckless.

Grumpy, The answer is you are NOT being overly cautious! There are way too many CMV wrecks on our highways each year. The vast majority of them are COMPLETELY preventable. My goal daily is to drive cautiously, leave plenty of room in front of and on both sides of my vehicle, and try to stay the hell out of everybodys way! Most days it is a complete S#1t Show out there.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Phoenix's Comment
member avatar

"You can go down a mountain too slow as many times as you need or want to, but you can only go down too fast once. "

I also try to avoid the need to use my service brakes descending hills, alternating levels of my engine brake to slow down or speed up when required... with the exclusion of slippery conditions. However, I disagree a little about ignoring those fools who race down the hills... I pay attention to what's coming behind me too, because I don't want to be in their way if they lose control.

My husband actually had a driver go off the road, crash over the guard rail, and lay his truck over a railroad track under a fallen tree, right behind us. One second he was in the left lane two seconds later he had a tree on top of him.

So yeah, I pay attention to everything I can. I don't let the super truckers alter my driving, but I'll stay out of their way and let them get to the scene of the accident first.

shocked.pngsmile.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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