Hauling Drywall Mud Buckets/ Joint Compound

Topic 25472 | Page 2

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Zach T.'s Comment
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I had V-boards. The issue isnt lateral motion, but forward and backward. USG stuffs these on smooth pallets that are too small for the 48 buckets per pallet. I've been driving a while and spent time as a trainer, too. I'm not gonna say I know everything, but I will defend myself on grounds of these loads being sketchy. I've delivered them a dozen times or more without issue. I x-strap the top front and put up pipe stakes every time as a precaution. The 3 times theyve fallen forward have been: shrinkwrap failure under strap causing side slump, braking on a downhill at 35mph within 60ft (not hard braking, but not super smooth, either), and the shrinkwrap failure load falling over a second time on the way to the nearest USG. I'm just tired of dealing with a load that no matter how many precautions I take, I'm leaving potential refusal up to luck.

Zach T.'s Comment
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Also, load under tarp was shrinkwrapped and palletized. The pallets they use are too small and not enough shrinkwrap is applied every time.

Zach T.'s Comment
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I know I'm being dramatic. Thank you guys, I really just wanted to start a topic on these for younger drivers googling these buckets for when they eventually have a load shift from them.

Turtle's Comment
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V-boards can be used on the front and rear of a load just as easily as they can on the sides. Sufficient down force on V boards with an X-strap to the front and rear should be enough to lock the buckets down. Unless I'm just misunderstanding the problem you're having.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Looks like flat-bedders use some homemade apparatus to secure loads, and probably have access to plenty of used cargo strapping. I had a construction project that required some really long lengths of strapping. We looked at a lot of options and what we finally used was seat-belt material. We found that most wholesalers who sell cargo strapping, also sell huge rolls of the seat belt material for surprisingly reasonable prices. I think the roll we bought was 5000 lineal ft. Very strong material.

Just putting this out there in case it has an application to trucking.

Ken M. (TailGunner)'s Comment
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I would see if they have some empty pallets you could use and put them strategically on top of the buckets and strap them down. Also the brick boards on the sides will help, and tarping over the top of the buckets and tightening straps down on the tarps to try and hold them all together.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Are pallets of drywall buckets ever shipped by dry van? Wouldn't that solve the securement problem or is that impractical? Not cost effective?

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
PackRat's Comment
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Are pallets of drywall buckets ever shipped by dry van? Wouldn't that solve the securement problem or is that impractical? Not cost effective?

I’ve delivered Sheetrock spakle before in a van.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
andhe78's Comment
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Are pallets of drywall buckets ever shipped by dry van? Wouldn't that solve the securement problem or is that impractical? Not cost effective?

I have no doubt they are shipped by dryvan. The reason we carry palletized freight on a flatbed is most often a lack of a dock.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Tractor Man's Comment
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Are pallets of drywall buckets ever shipped by dry van? Wouldn't that solve the securement problem or is that impractical? Not cost effective?

Dry van would probably be used to deliver to a warehouse with a dock. Flat bed probably to a jobsite where it would be unloaded with a fork lift from the sides.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
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