What Do You Guys Think About Roehl ?

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Burt G.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey guys just joined your site.Not looking for a pity party but I've lost a wife,mom and dad and brother over the last 2 years and now I just want to do something besides feel sorry for myself.I'm in my early 50s so I guess I still got a ways to go and have bills to pay.I've looked at a few companies but Roehl seems like a good fit. I havent talked with them yet as I just started the cdl permit cramming What can the pros tell me about the company?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Burt, Roehl is a good company. If you are looking in the area, Schneider and Wolding are great companies. Veriha is also in the vicinity. Do you research and there are many choices.

Chris M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey burt, welcome. I start my training with Roehl June 10th, in my opinion they seem like a great company to start out with, I'm doing Flatbed training. As Brice has said, Research, research, research. They also have great articles here on how to pick a company. Best of luck to ya!!!!

Army 's Comment
member avatar

Welcome,

Here is a great study guild

High Road CDL Training Program

Best of luck Chris

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Welcome Burt. First of all I am sorry for your loss. That is alot to go through in a very short time. I started my career with Roehl. I went through their company sponsored cdl training and they were my first company. I enjoyed my time there and the training was top notch. I did a diary way back then and there are newer ones somewhere on the site. I still to this day stay in touch with my trainer. They have continued to grow since. Give Kim Calhoun a call in recruiting. She will give you straight answers to whatever questions you have.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
member avatar

Good reputation for safety. Their rolling stock is always new, or new looking. They must govern somewhere around 62 - 63 mph, or else give one helluva fuel bonus based on the standard highway speeds.

Good luck. Once you get past the first winter, and about a year, it will start being a blast. I mean, youre getting paid to drive! Your ten year old self (I'm still there) would be jealous of you...

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Aubrey M.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm not a pro yet, but I've been with the company since January...I started with the Roehl GyCDL (Get Your CDL) program and now I've been solo for three months. I have no regrets choosing their program and this company.

They do maintain their equipment pretty well overall but no company is perfect. Given the number of newbies who come through the program you have a higher chance of getting a more than gently used tractor that will have it's share of irritations or issues, but nothing that will keep you from getting good miles. I do know of newbies who got a brand new tractor to start though, just luck of the draw. And two of the guys i went through training with have already been switched to one brand new and one newer tractor. I'm a hold out with my manual.

For decent pay, you just have to bust your butt and make it clear to your fm you are here to make money for yourself and the company. They have an app that tells you most anything you want to know about yourself as an employee. Though I'm technically at .385/mi i am averaging .434/mile so far when live load, short haul, detention pay and fuel bonus are figured in.

Safety is big and following distance is what they are on most people's cases for all the time. So practice staying back from traffic and slowing down for mergers or Lane changers before you even start here to make it a habit. It's an easy habit to fall back out of, especially running in heavy traffic often.

I never finished my post in the Training section about phase three i think, but covered phase one and two pretty thoroughly. Just search "journey to Roehl" and it should come up.

Even with the tail end of May and beginning of June being slow freight times I've had good miles, but have had to work for them. I'm dry van and we seem to have a stronger client base than flatbed division at least during this time of year. I don't know about refer.

Anyway I'm off to bed to be up at 11... Not my typical run time, but it's how the loads fell so i make a point to be flexible and shift my schedule as needed.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Aubrey M.'s Comment
member avatar

Oh, and we're governed at 65 with a 67 passing bump that varies in time or distance allowed depending on whether you're in a Freightliner or international. And the new tractors are all automatics/automated... Only rgn (heavy haul) is going to get manuals.

All 2017 and newer tractors have power inverters and all tractors have an epu for heat and ac. Trainers get double bunk ( condos) but there are some solo hand me downs with condos. But I'd expect a mid roof single bunk if i were you. So taking someone out with you after you are solo isn't really a thing like they say.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

KJ's Comment
member avatar

I went through the Roehl GYCDL program in April, got a trainer a few weeks ago, but it didn't pan out so well. Aubrey is dead on about the following distance, its what's holding me back from getting a truck. They want to put me out with a local driver (ew) tomorrow to sort out the following distance which my trainer said I have a problem with. I need a trainer that can simply say "at least this distance" on the road rather than "imagine this piece of paper is 2 football fields at 60mph".

Their dedication to safety over appt times is impressive. I agree, getting it faster isn't worth the gamble over spreading the load and possibly people all over the highway

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Andrew J.'s Comment
member avatar

I’m a current Roehl driver here. I fully recommend it to anybody wanting to start in this industry. I went into the gycdl program last year at this time and am close to finishing my contract out. The training is top notch. After you get your CDL which takes 3 weeks you’ll go to out with a trainer for another 19 days. Then you’re by yourself and monitored closely by a training manager who works specifically with new drivers. They do micromanage the first few months but they have to since you’re new. I’d rather have that than having to team with another brand new driver like some companies do. It isn’t easy all the time and sometimes I have wanted to quit but have stuck with it and am at 52 cpm. I drive in the reefer fleet and the freight has been slow recently so they do give the freight to the more experienced and tenured drivers so keep that in mind if you’re not getting lots of miles. You won’t make a lot of money your first year but it gets better and pay increases along with the miles. I definitely recommend it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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