When Is Training Considered "stale"?

Topic 25795 | Page 1

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Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Need very specific answer so IF YOU REALLY KNOW, PLEASE weigh in!

DETAILS:

Graduated 12/19/18 (diploma is dated 12/15).

CDL issued: 12/27

Hired by J.B. Hunt: 1/7/19

Let go from JBH: 2/15/19

(Work-related minor injury approx. 2/5/19 Surgery and recovery followed)

"No Restrictions" Return to Work and New (post-surgery and injury) Federal Medical Certificate issued: 6/3/19

SOooo... my SPECIFIC QUESTION is for how long can I just find a new employer (former or TBD) before I get to go back to school completely and/or have to take a "refresher" course? Also, who determines and/or drives this? (Recruiting, Safety, Insurance Company, FMCSA , ALL OF THE ABOVE?)

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CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Yer stale.

Companies typically want to see new graduates within 60-90 days of graduation. After only 30 days with JBH, and 4 months off the road - you really don't have enough experience to NOT REQUIRE starting from scratch, even with a CDL in hand.

Which doesn't necessarily mean GIVING UP your CDL - but it does mean going back to day 1.

If you can get back into JBH and restart (assuming they'll take you back), then that would likely be your path of least resistance.

As we always say - APPLY AWAY. But expect to start at the beginning again, wherever you end up.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

It varies by company. I had a trainee, who's still driving, doing an awesome job and has progressed to local Chicago driving. This trainee, to make a long story short, when I got her, she hadn't been in a truck in almost a year and her only experience was CDL school.

So depending on the situation, I've known West Side Transport to accept those who have a "stale" training certificate and no real experience. If they feel like you really want to drive, and will make a safe productive driver, they'll most likely give you a chance.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

It varies by company. I had a trainee, who's still driving, doing an awesome job and has progressed to local Chicago driving. This trainee, to make a long story short, when I got her, she hadn't been in a truck in almost a year and her only experience was CDL school.

So depending on the situation, I've known West Side Transport to accept those who have a "stale" training certificate and no real experience. If they feel like you really want to drive, and will make a safe productive driver, they'll most likely give you a chance.

Thanks Susan. West Side was on my short list, I think...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Wondering if I have a better shot and if it might be a better fit to try companies which offer a "Finishing School" for "recent" grads. Or am I no longer a "recent grad"?

Michael B.'s Comment
member avatar

There are a few companies that will take you on but yes, yours is considered stale. You fall into a hard category as your training is stale and your experience is not enough. Some of the "last chance" companies will still happily take you though. Western Express is another that comes to mind that will probably take you. Best of luck.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
Thanks Susan. West Side was on my short list, I think

West side took me after I graduated in February and I started there end of June. They where a good company to work for everyone is friendly and I liked their training program.

Had this linehaul opportunity not come up id probably still be there.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

West side would just say, since you don't have 6 months verifiable experience, youd have to go with a trainer for 4 weeks. A little secret.. it's not actually 4 weeks.. the 4 weeks begins when you arrive at orientation and ends after you test out.. so 3ish weeks with a trainer.

I also had another trainee who'd been let go by jb hunt and another company too because they said she couldn't back up after she'd completed training. I told her she was done being a career trainee and she needed to get outta my truck and get her own lol. Been over a year ago and doing fantastic as an OTR driver. During training, I had her do every bit of the backing as well as just pulling into random truck stops along the way, backing into a spot or two, and heading on down the road lol.

Had another one who was let go from another company.. kind of. Think pumpkins. Was having problems with the tight maneuvering, asked for extra help, didn't get it, had a minor accident, got frustrated and quit on a Friday.. talked out of quitting and 2 days later, a Monday, that company tried to fire her. She was a can hauler locally in Chicago.. the rail yards. We hired her as midwest regional and after a couple months solo she went OTR so get more PA and East coast experience like she had when she was training with me. After her 1 year mark, shes now a local home daily Chicago driver and doing very well. She had some minor mishaps in the beginning, but got it sorted out. Was just so nervous and terrified of failing but is now a confident, safe, courteous, driver.

The big thing was confidence in all those cases. Once they believed they could do the job, safely, then they COULD! The thing is, West Side wants to be known as a "different kind of company " in a good way. If they believe an inexperienced driver REALLY wants to drive a truck, they'll give them a chance to prove it.

Anywho, you're in our hiring area so call them.. the worst they can say is no, but I suspect they'll give you a chance.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Have you looked into CFI? Just a thought...

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Have you looked into CFI? Just a thought...

Not at all.

But I will now!

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