Grumpy - Hourly Questions

Topic 25812 | Page 1

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Rob T.'s Comment
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Instead of hijacking a different thread I had some questions for you regarding your NE Regional hourly job. For context here is what you posted in other thread

I’ve driven for 10 weeks solo for a total of 542 hours, so I am averaging 54 hours a week. That works out to $1084 a week for a newbie, and hopefully as I get better I will get even more hours. My low was 46.15, my high was 68.24. At least 80% and maybe more is drop and hook.

A lot of people in our drivers Facebook group are whining they aren’t getting hours. But those same drivers were complaining that I should have sat for 6 hours for a trailer inspection and take a chance my 3 loads would be cancelled and given to someone else. I said that if I kept the trailer until I got to another truck stop I would get it done. If not, it still had 28 days left. Those guys are perfectly willing to sit because they get paid.

I am convinced they run me like they do because I do everything possible to avoid live load/unload. If it is somewhere we have empties I always drop and hook. The ones complaining they aren’t getting loads are constantly posting about spending 7 or more hours unloading and never look for an empty.

If it were your company, who would you give the load to?

I got the trailer inspected by the way.

I did 62 hours so far this week, and that includes 24 hours of sitting due to schedules ( 3 times at 8 hours). I have 7 hours left on my clock, a 2 hour drive and possibly a live unload, then home.

When are you allowed to be "on the clock"? Are you only paid hourly for time spent driving or are you paid while sitting in dock being loaded? Are you allowed to stay on the clock during a breakdown? I understand why they pay hourly in that region but unfortunately too many drivers will manipulate it to do as little work as possible. There's no incentive for them to be more profitable for the company.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
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Grumpy—It’s been over an hour. Are you going to answer?

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Grumpy—It’s been over an hour. Are you going to answer?

Grumpy is too busy looking for an empty trailer.

Rob T.'s Comment
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Grumpy—It’s been over an hour. Are you going to answer?

He must be napping. You know how those hourly guys are rofl-1.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

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Grumpy—It’s been over an hour. Are you going to answer?

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He must be napping. You know how those hourly guys are rofl-1.gif

Rob—I figured you were going to comment on “old people”, so I’m surprised.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
Rob—I figured you were going to comment on “old people

Well I was speaking from experience, I picked up an extra day of work. Ended up sitting 2 hours for 2 pallets. Drove 30 miles and waited 2 more hours for 5 pallets. I tried to nap laying across the seats but couldn't get comfy and dumb sun was in my eyes. #DaycabProblems

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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Grumpy—It’s been over an hour. Are you going to answer?

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Grumpy is too busy looking for an empty trailer.

Sorry. Was driving, now I am live unloading.

I am paid for anything except off duty and sleeper berth.

That having been said, I have heard they are cracking down on paying for repairs, because drivers are milking their clock.

I was broken down on the side of the toad. Logs Dept told me I had to be on duty. My dispatcher said a few days later he couldn’t pay me hourly, that he would get me breakdown pay. I didn’t argue, I just said that Logs told me to remain on duty, that given s choice, I would have gone SB. I was paid and never heard another word.

Last week, I had a trailer with an air leak. I remained on duty until the shop told me I could leave. I voluntarily put myself off duty. I have no reason to believe Zi won’t be paid. Other drivers would have stayed on duty.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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In case I wasn’t clear, driving and live load/unload are all on duty, and paid. DOT inspection also. Fueling, road construction, traffic, etc. All paid.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
I tried to nap laying across the seats but couldn't get comfy and dumb sun was in my eyes. #DaycabProblems

At least you can lay across the seats I have a shifter in the way.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I tried to nap laying across the seats but couldn't get comfy and dumb sun was in my eyes. #DaycabProblems

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At least you can lay across the seats I have a shifter in the way.

They have a wooden box in between the day cab seats that's level with the seats at lowest position. Inside it is the fluids we may need. The dang ELD was in the way anytime I tried to readjust. Tried napping one time in a truck without the box. My back wasnt too happy for a few days. I'd balanced myself ok while awake but after falling asleep my butt fell down and folded me up hahaha.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

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