Paid CDL Training Questions

Topic 25911 | Page 1

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Aaron S.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello y’all, just have a quick question and I do apologize if this is been asked before because I’m sure it has. But I am thinking about doing the paid CDL training with the few companies that offer it but do any of them after doing regional trucking or do you not have a choice but to do OTR?

Thank you for your help and stay safe!

Best regards,

TexasPoonTappa

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Armin Hammer's Comment
member avatar

I am in the same boat as you getting ready to call recruiters. I think right off the bat you can only choose OTR solo or team. And only after your first year will they even think to consider you for a regio al gig.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

This is something you need to discuss with each recruiter. Actually many of them offer regional jobs, but it depends upon your residence location. They obviously can't offer you a Northeast regional position if you live in Arizona.

Regional experience is generally considered as OTR experience. One cautionary note to starting out in a regional trucking job is that you shouldn't try starting out with a job where you are responsible for unloading the truck. This is a common mistake people make. It just adds a lot of issues into an already steep learning curve. We don't recommend starting out on a "Dollar Store" regional job. Several companies offer that job to rookies, but it's really a tough job.

If hometime is your big concern, you just need to have an open discussion with your recruiter. Many of the trucking companies are trying to accommodate their drivers needs in this area. You also need to realize how critical that first year's experience is in helping you develop your ability to do this job in a way that is successful. If you can possibly commit to one full year of OTR then you will be in the very best situation for finding something that suits your needs better. Don't try to skip the fundamentals - don't try running before you can walk.

Going OTR isn't the only way to start this career, but if is by far the most reliable method to get a proper start. We teach "best practices" here, and you'll set yourself up for success a lot easier by following that OTR path.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

You could possibly look at flatbed companies such as TMC, and McElroy. Many flatbed companies try to get their drivers home every weekend which would mean you stay closer to home and run more regional.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Aaron S.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you for all that info. It was really helpful. I honestly do not mind going but my wife is pregnant with our 2nd child and she is really thrilled about the idea of me being gone that long, but I understand that it is a main part of beginning this career.

Thank you again for your time to answer my question.

This is something you need to discuss with each recruiter. Actually many of them offer regional jobs, but it depends upon your residence location. They obviously can't offer you a Northeast regional position if you live in Arizona.

Regional experience is generally considered as OTR experience. One cautionary note to starting out in a regional trucking job is that you shouldn't try starting out with a job where you are responsible for unloading the truck. This is a common mistake people make. It just adds a lot of issues into an already steep learning curve. We don't recommend starting out on a "Dollar Store" regional job. Several companies offer that job to rookies, but it's really a tough job.

If hometime is your big concern, you just need to have an open discussion with your recruiter. Many of the trucking companies are trying to accommodate their drivers needs in this area. You also need to realize how critical that first year's experience is in helping you develop your ability to do this job in a way that is successful. If you can possibly commit to one full year of OTR then you will be in the very best situation for finding something that suits your needs better. Don't try to skip the fundamentals - don't try running before you can walk.

Going OTR isn't the only way to start this career, but if is by far the most reliable method to get a proper start. We teach "best practices" here, and you'll set yourself up for success a lot easier by following that OTR path.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Aaron, one thing a lot of new people don't realize about trucking jobs is the long hours involved. I generally work close to eighty hours per week. A lot of new entry level drivers don't want to do OTR because they think they want to be home with their family more. Most local truck driving jobs are extremely demanding and the time at home each day is barely enough to shower eat and sleep. It's something you'll want to think about before taking the plunge. With a young family it can really be a challenge.

We have a member here who started with a local position which required unloading of his truck (food service). You should read his diary - it's very eye opening. I'm not trying to discourage you - I just want to help you have realistic expectations.

Rob's Diary

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

I am in the same boat as you getting ready to call recruiters. I think right off the bat you can only choose OTR solo or team. And only after your first year will they even think to consider you for a regio al gig.

Depends on the company, with Schneider you can start out OTR, Regional or even home daily depending on your area. But it's highly suggested to start out OTR.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Keep in mind regional does not necessarily mean more hometime. It could mean home more often, but not more. And it doesnt mean "local". It just means an area the company runs.

My ex was "regional" meaning he didnt run west of Denver.... but Maine to Florida to TX etc he did. He stayed out 2 weeks then came home for two days then back out. So he was home 4 days a month which is the same as many OTR. When he changed companies, the new company gave him two weeks "regional" out then a 34 at home... a 34 is NOT a normal person's weekend.

You need to specifically ask the recruiters about how much home time is involved and what the regional map is.

Roehl has great hometime routes if you live in certain areas, but the more home time, the less the pay. One of.our forum members was so excited to get a Roehl route that was 1 week out, 1 week at home. Sounds great? We warned him, but a year later he complained he only made $35,000. Cause he really only worked half the yea, but he didnt see it that way.

I would check them out. They have a ton of hometime options that look interesting.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
my wife is pregnant with our 2nd child and she is really thrilled about the idea of me being gone that long

I sure hope that is a typo!

shocked.pngrofl-3.gif

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