Which Company Would Offer Regular Home Time?

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Greg A.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi,

I'm just starting out in my career and looks like my only two options for solo driving are Swift or Schneider. Why only those two options you ask? Well I've applied to five and only have heard from two. Tyson's said they have a policy which if you're out of cdl training for more than 30 days, they can't offer you employment; which is complete bs.. Cargo(which has a good rep especially here in NC) said I've had too many jobs in the past three years despite my excellent driving, criminal and credit record. But I guess rules are rules...(eye roll)...

Swift or Schneider? Because I want to come home every week or 10 days. Forget that out for three or 4 weeks junk. Not interested at all; very unhealthy..

So to the people whom have semi recent experience with these two companies, which would be more probable to get a driver home on a regular basis.?

Thank you from North Carolina.....

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Lou's Comment
member avatar

I don't have experience with any company as I'm not a truck driver yet but have done some research. Have you looked into G&P Trucking out of SC? They seem to have pretty good home-time and run mainly in the southeast. Give them a shot.

Junkyard Dog's Comment
member avatar

Most OTR companies give you a day for every week you were out. There are many threads about this. Before you get into this business understand what you're getting into. Not trying to be negative about this but there are plenty of threads and articles you need to read. Start researching.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

No company gives a flip about your credit and almost every mega or midsized carrier can get you home weekly or biweekly. Some companies are very picky about your JOB history. As a driver, we work 70 hours a week. Some companies have learned that people with a poor work history don't tend to last long, but not every company is quite as picky about that. They do need to be able to verify your history/whereabouts (federal requirement) for a minimum of 3 years for a first time driver and 10 years for anyone who's previously held a class A driving job.

I don't know how you got the impression that you only have 2 choices. While its true that not every company accepts new drivers, quite a few of them do. You also must live within their hiring area, so they can be reasonably able to get you home.

Averitt, CFI, Werner, JB Hunt, Roehl, USXpress are just a few more that come to mind. Hopefully you aren't oozing negativity when you've spoken to recruiters, like you seem to be on this post... at least that's the vibe I got.

How long have you had your class A, and do you have a 160 hour training certificate? What type of cdl school did you attend and have you worked for any trucking companies? Inquiries minds want to know so we can offer better advice.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

Rohel has several options for home time. CFI can get you home about every 2 weeks. You should see if you can get a regional job. You will also need an attitude adjustment.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I started driving with Swift after going through their training academy. I simply asked my first DM if I could make a two week cycle be a regular thing and that was ok. So if you can handle being home every other weekend, it's a possibility with Swift.

if you're out of cdl training for more than 30 days, they can't offer you employment; which is complete bs.

Be careful, Greg, about telling a big company how to run their business. As a brand new, inexperienced driver, you need to keep up with your skills and get a bit more road miles before any company will trust you with their truck and loads.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Hicks's Comment
member avatar

I haul OTR dry vans and Wal-Mart dedicated refrigerated for Swift for the past year. Swift company policy is 1 day home time for every week on the road, with a minimum of 2 weeks in between hometime requests. Being home every 10 days is an unrealistic fantasy that will cost you money as you wait for dispatch to find you loads in a post-Trump trade war world. Realistically, you'll be out for at least a month before you take 4 days of hometime. And I reccomend you never take more than 4 consecutive days starting out, as insurance and training bill's are still accrued weekly even if you make 0$ because of you're home 7 days and didn't make any money.

Also, expect your hometime to run at least 3 days late. NEVER EVER EVER schedule a can't miss appointment on the first day of hometime, something stupid ALWAYS happens (weather, traffic, no loads) that will delay you AT LEAST 2 days. Always put your can't miss appointment at the LAST DAY of your scheduled hometime if you ever want to be there on time.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Also, expect your hometime to run at least 3 days late. NEVER EVER EVER schedule a can't miss appointment on the first day of hometime, something stupid ALWAYS happens (weather, traffic, no loads) that will delay you AT LEAST 2 days

Be careful not to exaggerate to make a point. You shouldn't expect to be home late every time, and something doesn't always happen. But yes, I agree you should not plan your home time to begin on a critical day in case something does go wrong and you do in fact get home late.

Being home every 10 days is an unrealistic fantasy that will cost you money

It's also not a hard and fast rule that you have to stay out for a certain amount of time to make great money. Some of the top paid drivers in the industry are LTL drivers and many of them get home every night and are off on weekends. The best paying job I ever had was a job where I got home every weekend, though it was also the toughest job I've ever had because I always had multiple stops and had to unload the freight myself.

Right now TMC Transportation drivers are making the highest salaries that company has ever paid and they're home every weekend. We've heard from drivers and I've been told by my contact there that $80,000 is quite plausible even for a first year driver right now, which would've been completely out of the question even a couple of years ago. TMC pays percentage and freight rates must be super high for them right now, but those rates won't last forever.

So just be aware of that.

as you wait for dispatch to find you loads in a post-Trump trade war world

That's truck stop talk. Freight is moving just fine. There's plenty of it. Some fleets grew considerably in the past two years and seem to be trimming things back a little bit right now because 2019 has been closer to average for freight volume and rates, but things are just fine out there.

I appreciate your willingness to help but please understand that your personal experiences are not universal laws of the universe. Trucking is an incredibly diverse industry. Something as simple as changing dispatchers or moving to another division within your company can radically change your circumstances out there.

Also, be careful about what you hear from other drivers because 95% of it is total baloney. I think the huge amount of time drivers spend alone with their thoughts allows them to come up with theories to explain everything they see and somehow their minds convert those theories into what they believe are stone cold black and white facts, universal truths, laws of the universe.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I'm just starting out in my career

Then you have nothing to offer, so stop making demands.

Tyson's said they have a policy which if you're out of cdl training for more than 30 days, they can't offer you employment; which is complete bs..

No it is a safety issue. You are an insurance risk and they do not want to accept that liability.

Cargo (which has a good rep especially here in NC) said I've had too many jobs in the past three years despite my excellent driving, criminal and credit record. But I guess rules are rules...(eye roll)...

It is about commitment and dedication. Showing you cannot commit to a job shows indecision, irresponsibility, and a lack of reliability. What if you decide to quit and you leave a $200k rig and million dollar freight somewhere and abandon it? Since you roll your eyes at rules, look at a different industry. Our clocks are managed by rules, our health, our rigs, and much more. I doubt you could handle taking only 10 hour breaks.

Swift or Schneider? Because I want to come home every week or 10 days. Forget that out for three or 4 weeks junk.

You will be required to do that "junk" in training anywhere. That junk is how you learn to really do this job. Everything you have written shows a thorough lack of understanding for trucking and an attitude of superiority which you have not earned. Big Scott is right, you need an attitude adjustment.

Everyone we see who comes to this site with your attitude FAILS after a few months. The ones in orinentation get sent home.

Not interested at all; very unhealthy..

A healthy person will find ways to stay healthy

So to the people whom have semi recent experience with these two companies, which would be more probable to get a driver home on a regular basis.?

Do you realize desirable jobs go to the most qualified people? Most people want more home time. So what makes you think that with no experience you earned a right to demand anything? Any sort of local or dedicated job which would get you home more will have you competing with esrablished drivers.

Good luck

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Forget that out for three or 4 weeks junk. Not interested at all; very unhealthy..

I'm not sure why you think that. You don't have to stay out for that long if you don't want to. There are some companies out there that can get you home on weekends. But don't say it's unhealthy. That's simply not true.

Greg, you sound really cynical and you don't sound like you're very committed to making this happen. It seems like you're willing to give it a try if you can do it on your own terms, but when you're brand new to something you don't get to set the terms very often. You have to prove yourself, pay your dues, and learn your trade. Eventually you may work your way up to having more things your way.

Rainy is totally right when she says that kind of attitude usually won't survive the first week of orientation. If you go in there making demands and rolling your eyes you're going to be on a bus home so fast you won't know what happened. Believe me, you won't be alone. There will be plenty of others. Every orientation or training class at every major company sends quite a few people home the first week simply because they have the wrong attitude. They're not committed, they're not open minded, they're not cooperative, and they don't take it seriously.

This isn't some telemarketing job you can scoff at. Trucking is really complex, extremely difficult, and deadly enough that one small mistake can kill someone's entire family. Most people either underestimate the challenges that lie ahead or simply aren't willing to do what it takes to make it in this industry. You should really consider whether or not you're 100% dedicated to making this happen and prepared for the hardships that lie ahead.

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