Training During Summer Vs. Winter

Topic 26044 | Page 2

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Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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Mountain driving in winter is not as scary as people make it out to be. The key is going slow and keeping a steady pace. If you feel comfortable at 40mph put your hazards on and stay right. if you dont feel.comfortable park.

My first WY trip i drove 7 hours and only got 160 miles or so. I felt like a failure. I saw a few wrecks and a truck jack knife in front of me and he slid across the median into the oncoming traffic. I apologized to my FM who said "great job! You are safe and kept me informed". Then after i got out of the snow, the wind blew over a truck in front of me. crazy stuff happens out here.

I don't chain up and no one is going to force you to.

If you start speeding and try to slow yourself that is when bad stuff happens. If you go slow you can correct yourself with less problems. the idiots are the ones who fly down the mountains then slam on the brakes and BAM!!!!!

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Mountain driving in winter is not as scary as people make it out to be. The key is going slow and keeping a steady pace. If you feel comfortable at 40mph put your hazards on and stay right. if you dont feel.comfortable park.

My first WY trip i drove 7 hours and only got 160 miles or so. I felt like a failure. I saw a few wrecks and a truck jack knife in front of me and he slid across the median into the oncoming traffic. I apologized to my FM who said "great job! You are safe and kept me informed". Then after i got out of the snow, the wind blew over a truck in front of me. crazy stuff happens out here.

I don't chain up and no one is going to force you to.

If you start speeding and try to slow yourself that is when bad stuff happens. If you go slow you can correct yourself with less problems. the idiots are the ones who fly down the mountains then slam on the brakes and BAM!!!!!

Rainy, SO true. Last winter I was probably the slowest driver on the road when it was bad, but I survived without a scratch. Didn't have to stop and park, but it was slow going. (Wisconsin boys are used to winter driving). When I was in school, I worried about all my classmates from Florida who didn't even know what ice and snow meant. Thankfully, all but one flunked out, and I still worry about him because he was a cool dude.

So I had a delivery to make last winter during the storm that closed down the NY Thruway. I got off at the last exit and got on the 2 lane that follows the south of Lake Erie. Three trucks followed me and we went through lake effect snow, basically a white out. I would have pulled off and parked, but there was nowhere to pull off from that two lane road. So here I was, Mr. Greener than green rookie driver, leading 3 other trucks who I assumed were being driven by more experienced drivers. But I just kept going, about 15 or 20 MPH, (or less), passing numerous trucks in the ditch. until I finally got out of the storm. Was a little late for my delivery, but no big deal. My DBL called and asked me how I got through that storm when many other Schneider trucks had to sit and wait until the Thruway reopened. I was honest with her. I told her that if you want to get something done, give the load to Old School or another old man. True story, (except the Old School part)

rofl-1.gifsorry.gif

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Junkyard Dog's Comment
member avatar

I had to learn to drive on the snow and ice on my own. Really doesn't matter if it's the mountains or just regular roads you have to drive according to the conditions. Now granted it probably would have helped me 2 train in those conditions... But I made it. The only accidents were in my underwear...

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

I had to learn to drive on the snow and ice on my own. Really doesn't matter if it's the mountains or just regular roads you have to drive according to the conditions. Now granted it probably would have helped me 2 train in those conditions... But I made it. The only accidents were in my underwear...

What's interesting is - by the time you're in phase II (team) training, your trainer will be in the bunk for the most part.

I grew up in the south - have only driven (a car) in snow once, coming out of a Grateful Dead show in Portland Maine, tripping my brains out (in a VW Camper - fitting). It was interesting to say the least.

I'd probably want to do my first experiences in a rig, under the watchful eye of a more experience driver.

Rick

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

I grew up in the south - have only driven (a car) in snow once, coming out of a Grateful Dead show in Portland Maine, tripping my brains out (in a VW Camper - fitting). It was interesting to say the least.

Say it isn't so!

Who'd a thunk it?

rofl-3.gifrofl-1.gifshocked.pngrofl-2.gifwtf.gifwtf-2.gif

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

There is one cardinal rule about winter driving: Snow (and ice) means SLOW!

SNOW means SLOW! Better to be late than to have an accident.

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

As an upstate ny resident and northeast regional driver to me there is only 2 season snow and road construction both are equally dangerous in traffic and require the same degree of attention so get up on that wheel and getter done SAFELY

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

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