ABF Driver Development Program Opportunity, Your Thoughts .

Topic 26080 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Seabee-J's Comment
member avatar

Hey TT , I just came across this job opportunity and decided to apply and wanted to get some feedback. The position requires a class A permit with tanker , doubles/Triples endorsement and ability to obtain a hazmat . I already have the TWIC and medical for my transit job , Anyway ABF would send you to school for 4 weeks and then train for approximately 4 more I believe . So you would then go into a P/D position. It's an hourly job and the yard is about 20min from my home , I know that they are a union outfit as well and I've heard some good things . Its seems like a decent opportunity and could balance it with my reserve commitment . I dont know if I'll even hear back but they were strongly considering applicants with some military background so I figured why not apply . I would love some of your guys advice if I do happen to get a call .

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

P & D is one of the most difficult ways to get started in this job. What major city are you near that you'd be working in? Especially being a union job it's all seniority based and being low man guess where you'll be? You'll be sent most likely into the downtown area because the senior drivers dont want to deal with it. Most drivers OTR say they dont feel their backing was decent until 6 months in. You will get 1 month and be expected to back into narrow alleyways, block rush hour traffic and keep a level head the entire time. Hopefully someone with experience doing that work will chime in, but if you rack up multiple accidents don't be surprised if you're let go and have a hard time finding work.

I'm not trying to make your decision for you but I dont think it's in your best interest long term. I know I'm a bit of a hypocrite because I did similar but knowing what I know now, I dont know if I'd go the same route I did.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P & D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Seabee-J's Comment
member avatar

It's a Long Island position , Suffolk county . I've had some experience backing 48' flatbeds with the Navy and lived and driven here my whole life to this point but I figured it would be more difficult. As for the union I've been in them for some time and know the in and out good and bad . Starting out always sucks and yea it could be awhile which is something I'm not sure I want to deal with again especially if I'm doing well but again if you're the low man it doesn't help too much . I'm just trying to prep myself if this does come to the table .

Banks's Comment
member avatar

It depends on where you are. Since the yard is only 20 minutes away, I would talk to some of those guys and ask their opinions on it. Ltl is different because while there's a set way of doing things, terminals operate independently. There's no way anybody can tell you anything a Google search won't turn up. To get real opinions you have to talk to them.

I don't know much about Union jobs, but from the guys at FXF that used to be at UPSF, they say they just sat by the phone a lot. They'd get runs or p/d runs, but they weren't enough to make decent money because the guys with seniority were taking the runs. Again, this varies based on how busy/understaffed a terminal is. Best bet, talk to people out of that barn.

Best of luck.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Personally I wouldn't advise starting out with P&D work in New York it could lead to a short career. P&D drivers at my terminal make about 10 stops a day but they are mostly newer modern facilities. not sure how many they would have you do but it could mean 10 plus stops of having to back and maneuver in tight quarters.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

If you stayed in long island it wouldnt be so bad ime but if you gotta go to the city i wouldnt advise it driving it your whole life and drivin it in a truck is 2 dif worlds

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Personally I wouldn't advise starting out with P&D work in New York it could lead to a short career.

I agree with this. We've watched a few people go against our advice and take a shot at these type of local jobs early in their career and it often ends quite badly. These are some of the most difficult and demanding jobs out there. You're in very heavy traffic most of the time and you're trying to get in and out of very difficult places on a rather tight schedule.

Just understand that if you take a job like this and get into a couple of little fender benders you're likely to get fired and it's going to be extremely difficult to find another opportunity elsewhere. I wouldn't say your career is over at that point, but it's going to be one hell of a struggle recovering from that. You're going to have very limited opportunities for several years.

If you're looking to be home regularly then a job like that would be awesome. But we highly recommend you get at least one full year of OTR experience first and then you'll have the skills to handle a job like that.

Safety is everything in this career. You want to take the safest, surest path into this career which is OTR. Build a strong foundation and then the opportunities will be limitless.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Seabee-J's Comment
member avatar

Just wanted to update this So I took a pass on this deciding while continuing my transit job and furthering my navy career besides I'd much prefer getting the OTR experience and lifestyle to start with as well as heading the sage advice of the forum for starting up a solid career foundation. After some deliberation and research I dont think I'd like being local much anyway, though I love driving the big steel it might wait for now . Want to start smart .

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More