Using The Throttle While Letting Out On The Clutch

Topic 26084 | Page 2

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Brett Aquila's Comment
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I have done it both ways, and stalled it both ways. For me, I guess it depends on the particular situation. Right or wrong, I will continue to do it both ways

Well, for people who care about driving the truck properly and not tearing up any equipment there's clearly a right way and a wrong way to do it. It doesn't depend on the situation. It depends on the skill of the driver and the understanding they have for how to operate machinery properly. You really should attempt to operate the equipment properly. It's not very hard.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

With a car inches from my bumper, on a steep enough hill, I will always finesse the pedal as I release the clutch. On flat ground, I just let the truck go.

The proper way to shift is double clutching , but how many actually double clutch every single time? Sometimes I only clutch to slip it out of gear, then float it into gear. Sometimes I just float it, with no clutch. Sometimes I will double clutch. Like I said, it is situational. No one can say they did /do it textbook, every single time.

double-quotes-start.png

I have done it both ways, and stalled it both ways. For me, I guess it depends on the particular situation. Right or wrong, I will continue to do it both ways

double-quotes-end.png

Well, for people who care about driving the truck properly and not tearing up any equipment there's clearly a right way and a wrong way to do it. It doesn't depend on the situation. It depends on the skill of the driver and the understanding they have for how to operate machinery properly. You really should attempt to operate the equipment properly. It's not very hard.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

I only use my clutch for start up personally As i was taught and experienced if the engine at an idle cant initiate moving forward with stalling than your in to high of a gear in my eperience 3rd is perfect everywhere except steep hills then ill use 2nd as not to sit there slipping the clutch

Brett Aquila's Comment
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The proper way to shift is double clutching

I wouldn't agree with that. That's the way they teach it, and that's the way they want you to do it on the road test. But properly floating gears does not do any damage whatsoever, and of course it actually saves wear and tear on the clutch. So I wouldn't say that floating gears is an improper way to shift gears.

However, feathering the throttle while letting out the clutch does in fact tear up the clutch and can put a tremendous amount of strain on the entire drive train, which can rip the drive shaft in half, bust out a U-joint, or tear up the rear end gear. That's why it's the wrong way to take off. It makes no difference if there is a car behind you. Put it in 1st gear, let out on the clutch, and the truck will take off smoothly.

As a professional you really should care about operating the equipment properly, especially after a few years of driving.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

Brett im not well written but that was all my sentiment glad to see i am not alone in feeling like that is right Hope your enjoying this amazing weather were havin in the adks this weekend sittin at the lake fishin with the family myself right now life dont get any better

Oz's Comment
member avatar

So, for the road test. Do they want you to use the accelerator from a dead stop, or just clutch out? Is the answer to that question tester/company/state specific? Now I'm curious.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

It's highly unlikely you'll be pulling a loaded trailer during the test so getting the truck rolling won't be a concern as long as you're in a low enough gear. Some drivers and instructors get too fixated on starting in 3rd or 4th gear. There's nothing wrong with starting in 2nd gear, even when you're empty, to prevent you from stalling the truck, especially during the exam.

You shouldn't use the accelerator until the clutch is fully out and you're rolling forward but I've never heard of that being a problem on a road exam.

Oz's Comment
member avatar

Just curious how retentive they may be when I get there.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

On the state test I used third gear to pull off. You can't shift in intersections or during turns. I pulled off in third got up to fourth immediately and put both hands back on the wheel so I wouldn't shift accidentally. It sucks going through an intersection at 10MPH, but that's what you have to do.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Yeah I have a bad habit of wanting to keep m right hand on the shifter. Need to break this quick lol learning these 10 speeds at school in crappy trucks don't help. Road time isn't even as much as I want or need, I NEED more road time, my DMV test is on 25th @ 7 am, and I don't wanna fail the road part !!

This school actually sucks too many students, not enough trucks. Seeing the given advice here to go thru company sponsored training is best, now that I've been thru this private joke of training....1 of 2 test trucks while in neutral, the splitter acts like you're trying to grind it into gear, and you're not even touching the shifter !! Young trainer said thats how this truck is pfffft.......Sure not worth their $5,000 price, hell $2,000 is too high !

In the best of 2 trucks, I do better actually, "faking" double clutching , and floating into the next gear , up or down! Feels like all the trucks 5th wheels are sloppy on the king pin, I swear seems and looks like about 1 1/2- 2 inches of slop between trucks n trailers (worn out junk with NO real maintenance lol I have got in touch with Werner last week, since I have my permit, that shaves a week off starting there, where hopefully can get better REAL training....

This whole WIOA process has wasted, taken too much time, and I need to get my butt earning a living ! hahaha

WIOA:

WIOA - Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (aka WIA)

Formerly known as the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), the WIOA was established in 1998 to prepare youth, adults and dislocated workers for entry and reentry into the workforce. WIOA training funds are designed to serve laid-off individuals, older youth and adults who are in need of training to enter or reenter the labor market. A lot of truck drivers get funding for their CDL training through WIOA.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

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