Company Flipping Me From Day Driving To Night Driving Over And Over

Topic 26099 | Page 1

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Dylan 's Comment
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As title says, only 2nd company to drive for but my first didn't seem to expect me to switch between days and nights nearly as often, this time around it's been 3 times in just a week, is that normal or am I at a bad company? Called to ask if I could get a more steady schedule, night or day driving I'm fine with either but rotating is rough, they said they can try but it just happens sometimes.

PJ's Comment
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The response you got is dead on correct. It all depends on your location, available hours, and freight. I do it more than I care too at times, but that is the luck of the draw..

Joseph I.'s Comment
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I would say to give it a chance as it will not be efficient for you are them to keep flipping you from night to day especially in the same week. You still need your 10 hour breaks and if you switch from day to night that will normally mean more down time. That being said I had to go from MN to Laredo TX last week and drove days down there so I could make my drop and pickup, I had a long wait getting loaded so stayed till evening to get a 10 hour break in and drove back, my choice, at night. It was great getting through San Antonio and Dallas before daybreak and the next night hitting KC at about 2:00 AM I never even had to take the cruise of or slow the whole way through the city.

Old School's Comment
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Welcome to our forum Dylan!

2nd company to drive for but my first didn't seem to expect me to switch between days and nights nearly as often, this time around it's been 3 times in just a week, is that normal or am I at a bad company?

Dylan, every new driver now days is plagued by that nagging question, "Am I at a bad company?" I think it's silly but I understand why it bothers everyone. All over the internet people are telling us how this or that company is "bad." For an experienced successful driver it makes no sense. I have close friends who are making top dollar and very happy with their careers at most of the companies that are slandered online. How can that be? How can people be successful and happy working at places like Swift, C.R England, or Western Express? Are you aware that each of those companies has a long list of "Million Miler Drivers?" You'd be surprised at how many really talented successful drivers are employed by the companies that are ridiculed online. All that slanderous internet information is total garbage.

In this career you want to move as much freight as you possibly can while being efficient with the time spent getting that objective accomplished. That's how it works. That's how you make money. That's how your employer makes money. I flip schedules from night to day every week. I make some great money, and my dispatcher knows he can count on me to get things done. We call effective productive drivers Top Tier Drivers.

I realize it's difficult and perhaps really demanding for a new driver to develop this practice of being able to flip back and forth. The thing about doing this is that it makes you a much more attractive employee. Everything about trucking is performance based. The folks who can get the most done get the best loads. They eventually become the top earners and are favored in many ways by their dispatcher. There's no fair or equitable treatment of drivers in this business. The best drivers get the best treatment. I can assure you that the best way to get yourself to the top in this business is to be willing to do what it takes. Sometimes part of that is driving at night.

Don't get all hung up on whether your company is good or bad. It's a futile concept that will keep you unhappy in your career. Focus on being the most productive driver you can be. That's the simple formula for success at this.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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My question is how are they flipping you?

I get a pickup appointment, and delivery appointment, anything beyond that is up to me. I do sometimes have to drive at night to make that happen, but I have no set schedule. Are you saying all your appointments force you to drive at night for a while, then days, or are they actually telling you when to drive?

Aubrey M.'s Comment
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As old school said, it's just the nature of the business. He also has some great info on here about time management. I've used his tips and advice to avoid running at night sometimes and stay on a more consistent or at least less drastic sleep change. However, you can't be scared to end late in the day or sometimes at night to accomplish that.

Personally, one of the first things i check out is if the shipper and or the consignee allow overnight parking. Already being where you need to pickup or deliver, or knowing you can do a ten once you get there can make a big difference in the start and stop of your drive clock.

Also, check pickup and delivery windows, there's usually one of them on a load that is flexible and will allow you to adjust your run time.

Doing these things isn't a cure all and there are still weeks where you will just flip flop back and forth if you want to be productive because of how the loads fall.

Also, maybe some of the pros on here can speak to this, but it seems to work out that if i run like that for a week or so then i end up with a really open run that allows me to catch-up on some rest with a better schedule but still run every day. Is this common, or do i just have an awesome fm and planners?

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jeremy's Comment
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Sounds alot like trucking for sure

Dylan 's Comment
member avatar

My question is how are they flipping you?

I get a pickup appointment, and delivery appointment, anything beyond that is up to me. I do sometimes have to drive at night to make that happen, but I have no set schedule. Are you saying all your appointments force you to drive at night for a while, then days, or are they actually telling you when to drive?

For instance yesterday I had to go pick up a load at 8 PM qnd have it back to the yard that night, finishing my run at 1 30 am. Today my load is from the yard starting at 10 PM and apt time time at location 460 miles out is 10 am.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Are you a local driver, or doing regional?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dylan 's Comment
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Thanks for all the replies just going to roll with it for a while! Should balance out soon.

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