Trucking Gadgets, GPS , Telephone Headset, Music ???

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Dennis R.'s Comment
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I understand what you all are saying but when I go to Truckers Report Most say don't go with Knight and so many others have a bad reputation over and over and over. Most of these companies seem to put you out with a trainer and then on your own or team and maybe a little home time. I could be totally wrong maybe they are good, this is just what I see, often.

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Dennis, there's a good solid reason we call this site "Trucking Truth." You are a victim of the rampant misinformation we literally fight against on a daily basis. You will find it next to impossible to jump into a part time class A Tractor Trailer job such as you seem interested in. Maybe at that point you'll realize who was shooting straight with you all along. It's a crying shame how you are being misled by what you expect to be a reliable source of information on this career.

Each of the companies that you think are so "bad" are the best managed companies in the business and are well represented here by long time successful happy employees. Each of our Moderators have proven to be operating at the industries highest levels of success while working for the companies that are so foolishly slandered online at the sites you keep frequenting. How can that make any sense to you? I'm a long time driver at Knight - couldn't be happier!

Old School, I don't believe everything I read , I am just saying this is what I read and most reviews that are bad are usually someone that got fired for a good reason probably.

These trucker websites are the only way I can get any info. I am in Korea so hard to ask a driver here. I seen a job on Indeed.com delivering cement in a tanker , no experience needed , will train. Driving 88 miles and delivering at big concrete company and return. 2 trips a day out and back 352 miles working days mon through fri and if you want more money you can do a run on sat but not mandatory. I think it paid around $200 per day. something like this is what I am looking for.

Is this site connected to these trucking companies that you have listed ? Which company has solo drivers and home on weekends ? Do any run regional where maybe out for a day or two ?

Example , I go to a company website and almost every site has reviews and they all have great reviews and people that hate them. No miles, long lay overs , managers etc...….

You have any ideas what I should do, who to believe , I go to any site I can to get info but you say the info I am getting is BS.

What is your best opinion on a company that would be a good choice for me ? :)

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

The biggest issue with the other sites is you're reading reviews and complaints by people who couldn't hack it as OTR drivers-- they're usually customer service nightmares on wheels. They'll refuse loads if they're too short, going the wrong direction, an unfavorable customer... Brett did a podcast about them, we usually refer to them as terminal rats. I can't say for 100% sure but if you're willing to pay your dues OTR you can probably carve out a little niche like you want. They just don't fall off trees.

Even with all your experience this is a new industry and it just makes more sense to listen to the people who *have* made it than the ones who got fired-- and in this industry there's never really a good reason for that. Companies don't want to lose drivers if they're safe, productive, and efficient. And if they are those three things they're not going to be the sort to get fired-- the company will help with training, resources, whatever is necessary to keep you on board. Old School has carved out a very successful spot with Knight, I've done (for my personal goals, if not entirely my wallet) very well by them. We have successful members at Swift (G-Town, 6yr), CFI, CRST, Schneider, and half a dozen other companies besides.

Long story short: put the time and effort in with nearly any of these companies (where you live will have some impact on this, freight available, freight lanes, terminals, etc), but all that aside you can make a name for yourself anywhere with the right work ethic, commitment, and attitude.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
you say the info I am getting is BS.

Keith said it perfectly:

The biggest issue with the other sites is you're reading reviews and complaints by people who couldn't hack it as OTR drivers

I like to ask people if they've ever read the book, "How To Complain, Blame, and Criticize Your Way To The Top"

It should be obvious that a book like that doesn't exist, and never will. So if you want to be happy and successful at something, why would you listen to people who haven't figured out how to get there themselves?

Also, think about this........does it make sense that the elite upper 1%'ers, the largest and most successful companies in this industry, are bad places to work? They have the best equipment, the largest variety of opportunities, the most money behind them, the best management teams, and the best perks for their drivers. Would you rather work for a struggling little mom-n-pop with a handful of ratty old trucks and barely enough cash flow to stay in business from day to day?

The misinformation about the large carriers and the incessent complaining by those who couldn't hack it in this industry is so rampant that I've done several podcasts on these subjects, including one about the "terminal rats" you're being confused by. Listen to these and see if they make sense to you:

You've said:

If a driving job does happen to come up that would be okay and if not no big deal.
I am in a position that I don't need to work just an interest in driving.

You mentioned that concrete job - at this stage of your life you don't need the money and you don't need to work, but somehow you think you would choose to drive back and forth hauling dry bulk between two dusty, dingy, noisy concrete plants all day, every day? That's how you're going to spend your retirement years? That's the trucking equivalent of working on a production line at a factory. How long do you see yourself doing something like that? I've had jobs like that. You're going to run away screaming like a madman in three weeks. That's not how a man who is retired and looking for something interesting to do is going to enjoy passing the time.

In all seriousness, get an RV and go enjoy yourself. I'm not being a smart-ass at all. I'm dead serious. You're not going to last three months in this industry because the jobs you're going to find are either going to be way too committing or way too boring and tedious. Then again, maybe you just want the challenge of learning to drive a big rig, getting your CDL , and playing the game for a little while before riding off into the sunset. That's perfectly fine also. Hey, it's your retirement - do what you like.

In my opinion, though, you should get an RV and go live the life you're really hoping for - an awesome retirement where you have all the free time in the world to enjoy travelling and take on any adventures you would like at any time. Trucking is not that at all.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Dennis R.'s Comment
member avatar

Brett , I watched and listened to the 3 episode's you listed above, very interesting and informative. Traveling around and working on airplanes for different company contracts is very similar. You hear all the rumors of the bad companies and a few were right haha but I really get it. I liked the part about living in Indianapolis , Chicago or in between. I am like 1 hour north of Indianapolis towards Chicago and being from the area maybe getting more home time than someone working that route / area from Jersey.

I had visited Knight Transportation in Indy but that was 4 years ago. Do you have any info on them or another company in my area ? If I had a company where later on maybe I could take my dog and wife that might be okay. Through the week I could be gone all week and probably be okay but not interested in being out any longer than a few days or maybe a week. Do you know of any companies that might do this in my area. I guess it wouldn't have to be in my area if the company lets you take the truck home as I am traveling through.

Any ideas ?

Also I was trying to share a video of my plane on Keith's post but it never loaded. I managed to put a picture with my profile but how do you load a pic or video ?

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you say the info I am getting is BS.

double-quotes-end.png

Keith said it perfectly:

double-quotes-start.png

The biggest issue with the other sites is you're reading reviews and complaints by people who couldn't hack it as OTR drivers

double-quotes-end.png

I like to ask people if they've ever read the book, "How To Complain, Blame, and Criticize Your Way To The Top"

It should be obvious that a book like that doesn't exist, and never will. So if you want to be happy and successful at something, why would you listen to people who haven't figured out how to get there themselves?

Also, think about this........does it make sense that the elite upper 1%'ers, the largest and most successful companies in this industry, are bad places to work? They have the best equipment, the largest variety of opportunities, the most money behind them, the best management teams, and the best perks for their drivers. Would you rather work for a struggling little mom-n-pop with a handful of ratty old trucks and barely enough cash flow to stay in business from day to day?

The misinformation about the large carriers and the incessent complaining by those who couldn't hack it in this industry is so rampant that I've done several podcasts on these subjects, including one about the "terminal rats" you're being confused by. Listen to these and see if they make sense to you:

You've said:

double-quotes-start.png

If a driving job does happen to come up that would be okay and if not no big deal.

double-quotes-end.png
double-quotes-start.png

I am in a position that I don't need to work just an interest in driving.

double-quotes-end.png

You mentioned that concrete job - at this stage of your life you don't need the money and you don't need to work, but somehow you think you would choose to drive back and forth hauling dry bulk between two dusty, dingy, noisy concrete plants all day, every day? That's how you're going to spend your retirement years? That's the trucking equivalent of working on a production line at a factory. How long do you see yourself doing something like that? I've had jobs like that. You're going to run away screaming like a madman in three weeks.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Dennis, you are an interesting guy, considering your current skills, background and trucking "wish list"

Brett suggested you get an RV and experience the adventure that way. Pretty savvy plan, based on what you've revealed about yourself. Now there is another option for you, one that is frowned upon here on this site (and I may catch some flak for even bringing it up). If you've got lot's and lot's of money you could buy your own truck and become a money losing Owner Operator. And you will lose money as an inexperienced driver and truck operator. But you would have more home time if you just contracted occasional loads and you could take your truck home; you could take the wife and dog with you. There are a few O/O here that are successful, but from what I understand, they are very experienced. But if you have money to burn and you are in love with driving a big rig over an RV, everybody here will advise against it, but it's your money.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Old School and I both work for Knight. I'm sitting at the Indy terminal for the night.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dennis R.'s Comment
member avatar

Dennis, you are an interesting guy, considering your current skills, background and trucking "wish list"

Brett suggested you get an RV and experience the adventure that way. Pretty savvy plan, based on what you've revealed about yourself. Now there is another option for you, one that is frowned upon here on this site (and I may catch some flak for even bringing it up). If you've got lot's and lot's of money you could buy your own truck and become a money losing Owner Operator. And you will lose money as an inexperienced driver and truck operator. But you would have more home time if you just contracted occasional loads and you could take your truck home; you could take the wife and dog with you. There are a few O/O here that are successful, but from what I understand, they are very experienced. But if you have money to burn and you are in love with driving a big rig over an RV, everybody here will advise against it, but it's your money.

Hey Bruce , I had researched this option a few years ago and if I was younger and trying to make a long term plan I might go that way. But I would have had to get more driving exp. for insurance purpose's plus a whole lot of knowledge about the industry. Like I say this is a job I am interested in but I do understand thr company has to make money.

Sodrel trucking offered me a job after I attend their school delivering mail and home every night but working like 12-14 hours 6 days a week. And driving old Mack trucks with a 6 speed trans , not interested in driving that much lol

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Dennis R.'s Comment
member avatar

Old School and I both work for Knight. I'm sitting at the Indy terminal for the night.

I visited that terminal a few years ago. Do they have local , regional jobs in the Indy area ? How long are you guys out usually ? What should I expect if I got hired as a new driver ? student ?

I remember seeing some type of training or program but cant remember the name ???

Are you both OTR ? What is your typical week like ?

Thanks

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar
Sodrel trucking offered me a job after I attend their school delivering mail and home every night but working like 12-14 hours 6 days a week. And driving old Mack trucks with a 6 speed trans , not interested in driving that much lol

Dennis I’ve read your replies and until now pretty much remained on the sidelines. The above statement sums-up your interaction with this forum...

First of all you’ve never driven an Old Mack with a 6-speed.

Second, you have repeatedly shared with us your burning desire to drive, yet basically poo-poo the options available to you and most of the expert advice we’ve given you.

The type of job/company you seek, is going to be very difficult to find, especially for an entry level driver.

I maintain the same basic theme initially offered; the “have my cake and eat it too” expectation is unrealistic.

Take some time to read this:

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

...then hopefully you’ll realize that trucking might be better left to those who are totally committed to the process and also the life style.

Good luck.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

If you're serious about this commit to 1 year of driving OTR then you will have many more options. There are places like Penske and Ryder that have drivers on call to transport tractor trailers to other rental shops where they're needed, but I believe they require 1 year experience. Even if they didnt, it would be your best bet as many of these yards are extremely tight. The grocery chain I deliver for in Iowa only requires "some tractor trailer" experience but in reality they are likely to overlook someone with less than 6 to 9 months. We hire drivers on a part time basis, only requirement is be available to work 1 day a month however it doesnt guarantee you they will need help the day you agree to. What I've gotten off your posts is you want to drive to see the country but only on your terms. Go buy a RV and enjoy retirement. I dont mean this in a negative way, I'd just hate for you to spend the money on getting your CDL and not use it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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