'69 Ford

Topic 26164 | Page 1

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Bingo's Comment
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I have been driving seed trucks for my brother-in-law's farm while I wait to go to CDL school, and I thought I would share a fun one with you lot.

It is a '69 cabover Ford turdbucket (I think that's the technical term) with a two speed rear end. It has little engine power, no power steering, no second gear that I can find, no seatbelts (I don't think they were required back then), and of course, no air conditioning.

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CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
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Beautiful - that's classic!

PackRat's Comment
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Love her already!

smile.gif

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Not many of those left!

Looks just like the last truck I drove for Schneider. Had a crank start and a cranky driver. Lol

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Awesome, I love it!

B_Dawg's Comment
member avatar

Lol awesome! Back in ‘94-5ish the landscape company I worked for had one of those. Actually ran pretty strong, aside from the “slight” play in the steering wheel. Let’s just say the boss liked to shop for discounts when he purchased his trucks. I used to call the ‘82 Ford p/u “Roulette” because whatever gear it happened to slip into was the gear you were using for the day.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Viking's Comment
member avatar

If it has windows it has A/C. Just not the modern kind. smile.gif

Bingo's Comment
member avatar

If it has windows it has A/C. Just not the modern kind. smile.gif

Somehow, the 90 degree air that comes in through the windows just doesn't seem that refreshing. =P

It is pretty nostalgic of a ranch pickup my great uncle had when I was a small child though. The dashboard is the same color and has those stars on it, though his ford was a pickup.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bingo's Comment
member avatar

By the way, at the end of the day yesterday, I discovered the right combo of movements to get it into second. So it's not so bad now. Still trying to avoid it though, lol.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

The first truck I owned was a Ford F150 pickup, 1975 or thereabouts. Then I bought a 1960 era F600 that a guy had modified into a dump bed, using the behind-the-cab winch. The winch could be used as a true winch, or put up through the gin poles to raise the bed. The most versatile work truck I ever owed, by far. I wish I still had it. 2 speed rear axle, tandem rear end. It was a beast and could do almost any task. Now that I'm on Trucking Truth, it kills me that I don't have a photo of it. The good old days, huh?

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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