New York City Combats Rash Of Cyclist/truck Clashes

Topic 26245 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
DaveW's Comment
member avatar

City of New York spokespeople, fed up with an increase in cyclist fatalities involving large trucks, are calling for the New York Police Department to target oversize trucks, and especially trucks driving outside of designated routes.

New York City combats rash of cyclist/truck clashes

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

From the article - it doesn't sound like TT's, but single unit panel (non-CDL) trucks.

NYC is a zoo - and I haven't been there in a long time - but if the bicycle riders are anything like the last time I was there, they (for the most part) ride like they own the road without consideration to any traffic around them. So it's no surprise to me they get themselves "eaten" by trucks. Bikes are one step down from cabbies in their complete disregard to others around them.

The comments on the bottom are funny as hell though.

Haven't been back to NYC since Jerry Garcia died. Even though I have family there - nothing could get me to even visit.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

From the article - it doesn't sound like TT's, but single unit panel (non-CDL) trucks.

NYC is a zoo - and I haven't been there in a long time - but if the bicycle riders are anything like the last time I was there, they (for the most part) ride like they own the road without consideration to any traffic around them. So it's no surprise to me they get themselves "eaten" by trucks. Bikes are one step down from cabbies in their complete disregard to others around them.

The comments on the bottom are funny as hell though.

Haven't been back to NYC since Jerry Garcia died. Even though I have family there - nothing could get me to even visit.

Rick

It's gotten a lot worse since then with bike rental services and bike lanes taking over.

The bike lanes usually serve as a spot to double park and bikes go around, into the traffic lane, without looking.

The other bike lanes are curbside where cars used to park and cars park about 3 or 4 feet into traffic. The problem here is that the bike tends to be out of sight until it emerges into traffic.

The major problem, is what Rick said. They take the quickest most convenient path. It can be in traffic, bike lanes or sidewalks. The latter being most rare because that law is actually enforced with zero tolerance.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I'm not going to reply to this article here because it would definitely see me on a political tangent.

I say NO to NYC and DC loads, so no worries here.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

"Let's also not ignore the fact that truck driving is a job which tends to attract the, how should I put it, "coarse minded" people. Aggressive, irresponsible, no concern for human life, violently dismissive of anyone's objections to the way they drive, willing to risk children's lives to squeeze through a red, that sort of thing..."

The above is a quote from the article.

You could say the same thing about some of the soccer moms out there on the road. The scariest driver I've ever been in a vehicle with was my friend's mom who drove us to soccer practice. Passing on the shoulder, flying around tight turns, accelerating towards red lights and then slamming the breaks...she was aggressive and dangerous!

Garth M.'s Comment
member avatar

I havent driven in the city but had a haul to Long Island a couple weeks ago. I was paid and extra $300 for the trip but I earned it. I have never seen so many aggressive 4 wheelers ever before I couldnt imagine cyclists thrown into that mix.

Bill R.'s Comment
member avatar

Rick S. wrote:

but if the bicycle riders are anything like the last time I was there, they (for the most part) ride like they own the road without consideration to any traffic around them. So it's no surprise to me they get themselves "eaten" by trucks. Bikes are one step down from cabbies in their complete disregard to others around them.

As a cyclist and one-time commuter, I can't agree more with Rick.
On any cycle (I currently ride a recumbent trike and just sold off my motorcycles) I keep my head on a swivel and in the mirrors. Bicycle riders are getting more and more "brave" and don't pay any attention to where they are in a lane or what is around them.
And motorists here in Nashville aren't making it any better, either. I rarely ride on the streets around here due to the quite likely chance some SUV will veer over the right line and BOOM. One of the main reasons I stopped commuting on the bicycle years back.
Thank goodness we have some decent bike trails/paths near my home.


RealDiehl...you hit that one right up the middle. Stopped at a red light on the motorcycle one day...SWOOSH!!!!...Escalade with a soccer ball on the back window just about took my left elbow off as they ran the light in the left turn lanewtf.gif the wind blast actually rocked me a bit.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More