Diagnosed With Sleep Apnea, But Lost Weight And Quit Smoking.

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Appalachained's Comment
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So I left my job that had health insurance for another that didn’t. I worked that job for a week and then swallowed my pride and went back to my old job after realizing (with help) I would need to do another sleep study. The first one my insurance paid for, but they wouldn’t pay for another. So I did another sleep study and apparently I still have sleep apnea. I was moderate to severe before. Now I am considered mild to moderate. I couldn’t believe it. Like I said before I sleep much better and fell better since losing weight and quitting smoking. I have an appointment to get a CPAP machine later this week. My deductible for that is $487 and I’ll have to pay $50 a month for the machine until it’s payed for. BTW the second sleep study cost almost $4000 not including my $90 deductible for the two office visits. Then after paying the deductible for the CPAP my sister offered to give me her’s which she got a year ago (Dreamstation). She lost weight too. Too late I guess.

Will I have to get another sleep study later to see if the CPAP is working? Or will I just have to prove that I’m using it?

Thanks for the advice guys.

Sleep Apnea:

A physical disorder in which you have pauses in your breathing, or take shallow breaths, during sleep. These pauses can last anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes. Normal breathing will usually resume, sometimes with a loud choking sound or snort.

In obstructive sleep apnea, your airways become blocked or collapse during sleep, causing the pauses and shallow breathing.

It is a chronic condition that will require ongoing management. It affects about 18 million people in the U.S.

CPAP:

Constant Positive Airway Pressure

CPAP is a breathing assist device which is worn over the mouth or nose. It provides nighttime relief for individuals who suffer from Sleep Apnea.

Rick S.'s Comment
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So I left my job that had health insurance for another that didn’t. I worked that job for a week and then swallowed my pride and went back to my old job after realizing (with help) I would need to do another sleep study. The first one my insurance paid for, but they wouldn’t pay for another. So I did another sleep study and apparently I still have sleep apnea. I was moderate to severe before. Now I am considered mild to moderate. I couldn’t believe it. Like I said before I sleep much better and fell better since losing weight and quitting smoking. I have an appointment to get a CPAP machine later this week. My deductible for that is $487 and I’ll have to pay $50 a month for the machine until it’s payed for. BTW the second sleep study cost almost $4000 not including my $90 deductible for the two office visits. Then after paying the deductible for the CPAP my sister offered to give me her’s which she got a year ago (Dreamstation). She lost weight too. Too late I guess.

Will I have to get another sleep study later to see if the CPAP is working? Or will I just have to prove that I’m using it?

Thanks for the advice guys.

I you're using it - you will not have to get another sleep study (most likely). But the machine has to be one that logs, and in all likelihood, the company will make you buy a machine that they approve (usually has a remote communications device for monitoring).

There are a couple of models that are common in trucking (can't say which ones though - I have no specific knowledge of those). Keep your CURRENT PRESCRIPTION FOR CPAP ON HAND (have the place you did the study at write you one if they didn't), as this may help you avoid having to do another sleep study (since a prescription is REQUIRED for the purchase of a CPAP machine).

Rick

Sleep Apnea:

A physical disorder in which you have pauses in your breathing, or take shallow breaths, during sleep. These pauses can last anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes. Normal breathing will usually resume, sometimes with a loud choking sound or snort.

In obstructive sleep apnea, your airways become blocked or collapse during sleep, causing the pauses and shallow breathing.

It is a chronic condition that will require ongoing management. It affects about 18 million people in the U.S.

CPAP:

Constant Positive Airway Pressure

CPAP is a breathing assist device which is worn over the mouth or nose. It provides nighttime relief for individuals who suffer from Sleep Apnea.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Appalachained's Comment
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I didn’t get a paper prescription. I do remember her saying she would start me off with 15 (?). I go to get the machine Tuesday. I’ll see if they can get me a copy of the prescription. I did ask the company that is supplying me with the machine if it would suffice for CDL compliance. She said it had a modem and would pass.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Appalachained's Comment
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So do you guys that use CPAP’s use the full sized versions or do you use a smaller travel version?

CPAP:

Constant Positive Airway Pressure

CPAP is a breathing assist device which is worn over the mouth or nose. It provides nighttime relief for individuals who suffer from Sleep Apnea.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Rick said: "So - while you're still obviously miffed that your OSA/CPAP compliance is one of the main reasons you're off the road - to dismiss the illness as a SCAM, is kind of shortsighted - despite the fact that the trucking companies may in fact see "some financial benefit" in the deal."

Rick, I do know that people have sleep apnea , I don't dispute that. My concern is that the diagnosis is not objective because of the special interests involved. I'd be curious to know if there are any statistics that show the percentage of truck drivers diagnosed with OSA as compared to the general population. It seems to me that Schneider took a "scatter gun" approach to OSA. I would like to know how many Schneider drivers who go in for a sleep study get diagnosed with OSA? I'll bet it's 100% or close to it.

On the other hand, if and when I go back to driving, I would hope my weight loss and better BP would take me out of contention for OSA. If not, I would get another machine and stay in compliance, without hesitation. So, I'm not trying to crusade against OSA. I'm only basing what I think on my own experience. This in no way means any disrespect for your knowledge or opinion.

Sleep Apnea:

A physical disorder in which you have pauses in your breathing, or take shallow breaths, during sleep. These pauses can last anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes. Normal breathing will usually resume, sometimes with a loud choking sound or snort.

In obstructive sleep apnea, your airways become blocked or collapse during sleep, causing the pauses and shallow breathing.

It is a chronic condition that will require ongoing management. It affects about 18 million people in the U.S.

CPAP:

Constant Positive Airway Pressure

CPAP is a breathing assist device which is worn over the mouth or nose. It provides nighttime relief for individuals who suffer from Sleep Apnea.

Appalachained's Comment
member avatar

So I slept with the machine for the first time last night. I am unimpressed. I woke up (all the way) more often than usual. My nose was stopped up and dried out and the mask hurt the top of my nose. Oh well it has to get better, maybe a different mask.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Give it a week or so and you should notice a difference. When I first started using mine I felt the same as you do but over time I started to sleep better WITH it than without. With my job I periodically get stuck in an unexpected layover in a hotel overnight and have to sleep without it (due to not packing it) and I feel much more tired the following day. I also wake myself up from snoring or feeling like I'm choking. One thing my sleep dr had suggested was sitting on the couch watching tv with it on the first couple days just to get accustomed to having something on your face. Most people notice a difference in actually feeling rested, however some never do and say they feel worse.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Appalachained's Comment
member avatar

Give it a week or so and you should notice a difference. When I first started using mine I felt the same as you do but over time I started to sleep better WITH it than without. With my job I periodically get stuck in an unexpected layover in a hotel overnight and have to sleep without it (due to not packing it) and I feel much more tired the following day.

Thanks. I hope that’s the case with me. The second night was better than the first.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bullitt_VW's Comment
member avatar

Does your machine have a humidifier? Maybe crank it up more?

Do you have full mask or just nose?

So I slept with the machine for the first time last night. I am unimpressed. I woke up (all the way) more often than usual. My nose was stopped up and dried out and the mask hurt the top of my nose. Oh well it has to get better, maybe a different mask.

Donald B.'s Comment
member avatar

So in Febuary 2019 I was considering leaving my current job ( high volume, full service car wash GM ) for another until I go to trucking school in April 2020 ( I have been planning on this for Five years now and can pass practice CDL permit practice tests at 98%-100% and am pretty sure I can do a pre trip inspection almost flawlessly) and I knew I would lose my health insurance. I have a strong family history of colon cancer on both sides and I hadn’t seen a doctor in 21 years. So I go to the doctor and found I was obese, had high blood pressure and prediabetes. I did a sleep study and was determined to have moderate sleep apnea. I didn’t get a CPAP because of the cost.

I decided to make a change. I worked a physical job, but put a lot of garbage in me. I was a two pack a day smoker. I drank 8-10 Coca-Colas everyday. I ate fast food three times a day and ate a lot of sweets just before bed.

Anyway I smoked my last cigarette on Valentine’s Day. I haven’t drank a Coca-Cola since March 1. I haven’t eaten fast food or any processed food or anything with added sugar since March 1. I had a checkup jut recently before I finally quit my job and my blood pressure is ideal. My blood sugar is normal and My BMI is in the normal range (23.95). I’ve lost 40 pounds to date. I made these changes of course for myself, but in anticipation of becoming a truck driver.

My issue is that I can’t afford to buy a CPAP machine now or do another sleep study to determine if the condition has changed now that I don’t have insurance. I however am sure that I sleep better now. Before the health changes i would sleep 5 hours a night max. If left alone for a few minutes I would fall asleep during the day. I used to wake up with headaches and would be groggy for the first couple hours of the day. Now I can easily sleep 8 hours or more. I have dreams every night (I never dreamed before) I no longer am sleepy during the day etc..

I would never drive a big truck with the conditions I used to have. I wouldn’t endanger the public or myself.

My question is: If I go to get a CDL physical is it going to show up on my medical records that I had this condition? Will the doctor performing the physical have access to the record? I don’t want to go to Joplin or North Little Rock and be turned away after all the preparations I have been making.

I have been planning on trucking for a decade now. I am 42 years old and I think that trucking would perfectly fit my aptitude. I have a good paying job now. It’s just not something that I can retire doing. I also think I would like the trucking lifestyle. If I quit my current job and fail at trucking I’m screwed as I’ll never find another good paying job with my amount of education.

congrats on kicking the cigarette habit, I gave smoking the boot for good back in 2006, I am 55 now.... now, i'm working on my obesity...... when I smoked a pack of Marlboros a day since age 20, 1984, I was right around 210-215 pounds at 5-10 height. I smoked all thorough he army, 1988-1995, and got a pack of cigs at the PX for about only 80 cents a pack way back then!! giving up the tobakee made me progressively get fatter and fatter over the years. I was 325 back in 2016 but now I'm down to 300.... i ride 3-5 miles day on my bicycle but now I have a new exercise bike coming tomorrow from amazon.com so I can burn 500 calories a day in the comfort of my air-conditioned home...I can only pedal the bike outside early in the morning or late at night during summer months....it might be pretty much too cold to bike outside during the winter months....keeop up the good work....I'm a vet and get VA health benefits....the VA covers my CPAP if I were ever to need one...I got a negative for my sleep apnea test at the VA back in late 2017 ... apnea is often gotten over by not smoking, weight loss and regular exercise

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Sleep Apnea:

A physical disorder in which you have pauses in your breathing, or take shallow breaths, during sleep. These pauses can last anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes. Normal breathing will usually resume, sometimes with a loud choking sound or snort.

In obstructive sleep apnea, your airways become blocked or collapse during sleep, causing the pauses and shallow breathing.

It is a chronic condition that will require ongoing management. It affects about 18 million people in the U.S.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

CPAP:

Constant Positive Airway Pressure

CPAP is a breathing assist device which is worn over the mouth or nose. It provides nighttime relief for individuals who suffer from Sleep Apnea.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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