Just Got My CDL Permit Here In Arizona, Heading For Prime Training Saturday, August 24 In Salt Lake City

Topic 26334 | Page 2

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Johnnylite's Comment
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So here’s a couple; bring a notepad and pen and pencil to write notes to yourself. Boots or slip resistant good shoes will save your toes. Sheet set and a sleeping bag plus your favorite pillow. Most important thing to bring is an open mind free of advice about the job. You’ll figure it out yourself and by observing other drivers including your trainer. If you’re at a truck stop watch people back into spots you think are impossible . Take pictures and watch their setup. Practice,practice, practice and then practice some more. Remember also it’s a job you’re trying to do not a lifestyle or label you’re trying to achieve. Be a listener not a talker and you’ll be amazed what people will share with you.

Last and most important never forget you’re always learning and if you see somebody who needs help even if it’s just a pair of eyes do it. I cannot tell you how many people helped me and I’ve tried to help that at the end said “ we were all new once.

G-Town's Comment
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Johnnylite advised...

Take pictures and watch their setup. Practice,practice, practice and then practice some more.

Spot-on advice.

The setup is more important that the actual backing move...it's not taught in the schools. When I G.O.A.L. before backing; I am actually sizing-up how I intend to set-up. Give the setup at least the same amount of focus and attention. If you watch a driver totally nailing a tight 45, it has way more to-do with effective set-up.

...and like Johnny mentioned: Practice...practice...and more practice. Repetition is the best teacher for most of the basic driving skills.

Havanah S.'s Comment
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Would it be okay to bring like a suitcase with you as long as it can fit in the bunk? I just feel that I would be able to keep everything a lot more organized if I could see it laid out. I am going out with my father, who is an own op, for two weeks before my orientation week at Prime (start date is September 16), so I should be able to test out everything that I plan on taking with me. (So far) What I have packed to go with me is: - 3 pairs of jeans (one legging and two boot cut) - a pair of leggings - three t-shirts (navy, grey, blue) all have old company logo on it. - a black t-shirt - 3/4 sleeve baseball shirt (has a name of a destination on it) - Long sleeve with old company logo - belt - Oldish Tennis Shoes (black for work) - Shower shoes - boots

Still need to pack everything, but that is where i am at. Also, I don't really have that many other clothes that don't have my old companies logo on it. Hope that isn't a problem. I will probably will not buy any more clothes until I start making money.

Errol V.'s Comment
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Speaking of bunks, remember truck bunks are longer thal the usual bed. I'm 6'2" . On my road training I had to keep my duffle bag at the foot of my bunk, and I still had plenty of room to stretch out.

FYI, most of those bunks take XLT (long twin) bedsheets.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Turtle's Comment
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PPE?

1. Hard hat. 2. Safety glasses. 3. Steel toe boots (6 inch ok?). 4. Gloves.

Anything else like long pants?

Rob.

The strictest PPE rules I've encountered at a customer have been:

1- Hard hat

2- Safety glasses

3- Hearing protection

4- Long sleeve shirt

5- Gloves

6- Safety vest

7- Long pants

8- Steel toe boots (6" is ok)

That said, some of the time you can get away with shorts and a hi vis t-shirt. Gotta be prepared though.

Turtle's Comment
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Would it be okay to bring like a suitcase with you as long as it can fit in the bunk?

Yes, as long as it can sleep with you in the bunk, it's OK.

If it fits, it ships.

Havanah S.'s Comment
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Thank you for your quick responses. So I was wondering how I can put my father at rest about possibly having a male trainer. I believe he is worried that something might happen while on the trainers truck with me being a female. Maybe I am unaware of the possible things that could happen, and I don't really see it as a big problem, but I don't know how to tell him that it is going to be okay.

Turtle's Comment
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Well, first you can request a female trainer if you want. Prime has a high percentage of female drivers/trainers, so that shouldn't be a huge issue. However, if you're flexible to a trainer of either sex, it may speed up the process as there are simply more male trainers available at any given time.

Otherwise, tell your dad that this is a professional company with professional trainers. It's just like any other job when you're working in close quarters with someone else.

Rob D.'s Comment
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Turtle said:

The strictest PPE rules I've encountered at a customer have been:

1- Hard hat

2- Safety glasses

3- Hearing protection

4- Long sleeve shirt

5- Gloves

6- Safety vest

7- Long pants

8- Steel toe boots (6" is ok)

That said, some of the time you can get away with shorts and a hi vis t-shirt. Gotta be prepared though.

I'll make sure to bring some ear plugs as well. The rest I'll have as part of my regular clothes.

I ordered a pair of these with the wedge sole, because I'm assuming the flatbed deck can get slippery, plus I don't want to catch my heel when I'm walking on a load and fall.

Thorogood Moc Toe

I want to make sure that I break them in before I show up for orientation.

BTW, you don't encounter much dirt and grime in flatbedding do you? Because I don't want to keep my new boots shiny and clean.smile.gif

Old School's Comment
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BTW, you don't encounter much dirt and grime in flatbedding do you?

rofl-1.gifrofl-2.gifrofl-3.gif

I changed clothes three times yesterday. That's more than some of these dry-van guys change in a week!

There's going to be days you will get dirty, sweaty, and nasty. Boots are made for working - let 'em look like you know what you're doing. I can always spot the rookie flatbedders by their shiny new work boots.

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