My Tightest Backing Yet

Topic 26388 | Page 1

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Junkyard Dog's Comment
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Delivered in Denver today what a crappie place to deliver. Getting in was bad enough. I did the Google Earth last night I thought I this isn't bad. But it's a lot tighter than it looks. If you had a truck to your left you couldn't get out until that truck left there just wasn't room to turn. I knew trucks were unloaded and I was wondering why they didn't leave now I know. And the entrance to this had two other companies before you got to this and if they had 53-foot trailers you had to wait until they left to even get into the lot. But I did it. Put my tandems as far up as I could only had to do two goals and 5 pull ups. Even on my directions code from dispatch it said very tight backing.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

PackRat's Comment
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Looks like a nice challenge to spice things up.

Rob T.'s Comment
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Dang! Great job

Junkyard Dog's Comment
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And yes packrat it was a challenge and it did spice my day up...wtf.gifwtf-2.gifsmile.gif

PackRat's Comment
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Excellent! Now all the rest of them should be easy.smile.gif

Bre The Newbie 's Comment
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Great Job! Let me say if that were me because im still fairly new and lack confidence in my backing skills..i wouldnt be able to do it by myself. It amazes me seeing you guys and how you guys maneuver to get backed into places. I hope i get as good as you guys one day.

Junkyard Dog's Comment
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Forgot to mention the last picture I posted was the way into the facility. When I first got there there was a cab on a trailer and you couldn't get through until they were done unloading. One reason I felt good about this was two of the warehouse drivers in day cabs did more pull-ups than I didsmile.gif

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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JYK9, you gotta feel good about that one!

RealDiehl's Comment
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Yeah, dude. I'd have been sweating that one out! Good job getting it backed in.

Chris L's Comment
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0319511001567164260.jpg0214480001567164321.jpg0473798001567164361.jpgI So this was my challenge this morning the Consignee wanted me into door 10 since there wasn't any manuvering next to the trailer at the end I couldn't do a see side back. So I figured that I would swing down close to the trailers and loop up towards the fence and get it close as possible to do a straight line back. Well it worked perfectly if I could back into door 9. Then I spent about 15 minutes trying to get lined up with door 10 it got frustrating I'm either cutting the wheel to soon or way to late. On thing I have learned is no matter how difficult the spot I have to back into I'm the only one who has to do it! I might fustrate the shipper or consignee whose door I'm backing into because it takes me a while longer but I know that will start getting better.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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