DOT Physical For UPS Driver

Topic 26436 | Page 1

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Brenda M.'s Comment
member avatar

I am trying to break into Driving later in life, age 57. I passed the Road Test now have DOT Physical. I have had treatment for Depression & anxiety for many yeats and take anti depressants, anit-anxiety meds & ambien to sleep. From what I have read my meds are automatic Disqualification. Since I am not trying to get a CDL or drive OTR do I still have a shot? Or should I stop taking meds and just not included any disclosure about treatment or meds.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

You took the road test but you haven't had a DOT physical, nor are you trying to get a CDL?

What road test did you pass? For your regular license?

Why would you need a DOT physical if you're not getting a CDL?

I'm a little confused.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

You took the road test but you haven't had a DOT physical, nor are you trying to get a CDL?

What road test did you pass? For your regular license?

Why would you need a DOT physical if you're not getting a CDL?

I'm a little confused.

I think Brenda is referring to the road test UPS gives their package delivery drivers before hire. This is hiring season because they're preparing for peak season so they do the road test first then DOT physical. Why pay for the physical if you can't drive?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Brenda M.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes, I took the UPS Package Carrier Road Test. Next step for employment is DOT Physical. Concerned about my meds & treatment histroy. Driving a UPS truck is no where near as dangerous as what you all do.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Yes, I took the UPS Package Carrier Road Test. Next step for employment is DOT Physical. Concerned about my meds & treatment histroy. Driving a UPS truck is no where near as dangerous as what you all do.

It's just as dangerous. You're driving through residential areas with a sense of urgency while people are out and kids are getting on/off buses and playing outside. Even for your safety, you're jumping in and out of a truck over 100 times a day while people are driving distracted or in a rush.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes, I took the UPS Package Carrier Road Test. Next step for employment is DOT Physical. Concerned about my meds & treatment histroy. Driving a UPS truck is no where near as dangerous as what you all do.

At any rate, we have some articles that may answer your question: DOT Drug and Alcohol Policies & Testing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

If you have a job that requires a CDL and doesn't fall under the categories for "Intrastate Exempt" (and driving a UPS truck is NOT IN AN EXEMPT CATEGORY) - then you are going to be required to PASS A DOT PHYSICAL and obtain a Medical Certificate.

While UPS DOT Docs (and safety departments) may be "less stringent" than OTR companies - there are SOME MEDICATIONS that are just NOT ACCEPTABLE under the medical qualifications.

Neither is it advised to just "stop taking your meds" - because there can be serious physical (and mental) consequences if you do. For example - sudden cessation of Benzodiazepines can result in seizure and even death. YOU SHOULD NEVER DISCONTINUE YOUR MEDS EXCEPT UNDER DOCTOR GUIDANCE AND SUPERVISION.

Likewise - LYING ABOUT MEDS AND CONDITIONS can have some serious consequences. DOT Med forms are FEDERAL DOCUMENTS - than can be criminal/civil penalties for lying. Also - if you get in a SERIOUS ACCIDENT - and a tox screen shows meds (especially those you haven't declared) - there can be serious criminal & financial liability.

Some Meds are AUTOMATIC DISQUALIFICATIONS , some can slide by - ALL have to have a written diagnosis from the PRESCRIBING PHYSICIAN, which also must note (certify) that you are stable on your meds and they will not affect your ability to SAFELY OPERATE A COMMERCIAL VEHICLE. Pretty much ANY MED which has "may cause drowsiness" as a side effect, is going to be a DEAL BREAKER. Not ALL of them that say that - but most.

You can GOOGLE you meds and FMCSA to see if they are strictly prohibited.

Another thing - as some have mentioned - is that the UPS Hirings this time of year are typically SEASONAL and go away after January. Unless this is for a FULL TIME POSITION, you may want to consider whether or not you want to risk throwing your physical and mental well-being into turmoil to get off or switch medication regimens. It usually takes quite some time to get the right combination of meds and get stabilized - especially if you are on a multiple med regimen.

I'm not being judgemental here, except at the med/pharma industry - which has a tendency to just throw scrips at people to solve their feelings. If you actually suffer from the conditions that you describe - and they are being well managed by your meds, is it really worth driving a UPS Delivery truck @ 57 (which also requires a lot of physical activity)?

1 - Don't lie. 2 - You may be DQ'd because of the meds you are on (quite likely). 3 - Don't just stop taking your meds without your doc supervising. 4 - Decide if the job (especially if it is temporary) is really worth going through the roller coaster of coming off or changing your med regimen.

Best of luck - keep us posted...

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

I am trying to break into Driving later in life, age 57. I passed the Road Test now have DOT Physical. I have had treatment for Depression & anxiety for many yeats and take anti depressants, anit-anxiety meds & ambien to sleep. From what I have read my meds are automatic Disqualification. Since I am not trying to get a CDL or drive OTR do I still have a shot? Or should I stop taking meds and just not included any disclosure about treatment or meds.

Since the new contract, UPS is hiring lots of full-time delivery drivers. Called "22.4" drivers, they are paid a less than regular Package Car Delivery Drivers but benefits are the same.

You *must* make sure your full-time job is for the 22.4 and NOT a seasonal driver.

That said, at this point what is there to lose? You've qualified for the program. Now go do your physical and let the doctor tell you what you must do to get your DOT card.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained :)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

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