5 Ton Weight Limit To Get To Rest Stop

Topic 26792 | Page 1

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Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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NY State just built a Welcome Center with about 10 truck parking spots.

It does not have direct access to the interstate (I-190), you have to take an exit and travel a few hundred feet on two local roads. The local road the Welcome Center is on has a 5 ton limit.

Is there an exception for this? I can’t find anything but I’m far from an expert.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Rob D.'s Comment
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REASONABLE ACCESS States must allow CMVs that do not exceed Federal maximum width and minimum length limits applicable to the NN (not including combinations subject to the ISTEA freeze on length) to have reasonable access between the NN and terminals and facilities for food, fuel, repairs, and rest. Terminals are defined as any location where freight originates, terminates, or is handled in the transportation process. Access must be allowed up to 1.61 km (1 mile) from the NN by the most reasonable and practicable safe route. For access to terminal and service facilities beyond 1.61 km (1 mile) from the NN, the route may be requested from the State. Access must be granted if the vehicle can safely travel the route as determined by a test drive. If a State does not act upon a request within 90 days, access is automati-cally granted. If access is granted to one vehicle type, it applies to all vehicles of the same type, regardless of carrier.

States must also allow access between the NN and points of loading and unloading to household goods carriers, motor carriers of passengers, and any truck tractor-semitrailer combination in which the trailer or semitrailer has a length equal to or less than 8.53 m (28 feet), or 8.69 m (28.5 feet) for appropriately grandfathered equipment, and which generally operates as part of a truck tractor-semitrailer-trailer combination.

Federal Size Limitations

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

REASONABLE ACCESS States must allow CMVs that do not exceed Federal maximum width and minimum length limits applicable to the NN (not including combinations subject to the ISTEA freeze on length) to have reasonable access between the NN and terminals and facilities for food, fuel, repairs, and rest. Terminals are defined as any location where freight originates, terminates, or is handled in the transportation process. Access must be allowed up to 1.61 km (1 mile) from the NN by the most reasonable and practicable safe route. For access to terminal and service facilities beyond 1.61 km (1 mile) from the NN, the route may be requested from the State. Access must be granted if the vehicle can safely travel the route as determined by a test drive. If a State does not act upon a request within 90 days, access is automati-cally granted. If access is granted to one vehicle type, it applies to all vehicles of the same type, regardless of carrier.

States must also allow access between the NN and points of loading and unloading to household goods carriers, motor carriers of passengers, and any truck tractor-semitrailer combination in which the trailer or semitrailer has a length equal to or less than 8.53 m (28 feet), or 8.69 m (28.5 feet) for appropriately grandfathered equipment, and which generally operates as part of a truck tractor-semitrailer-trailer combination.

double-quotes-end.png

Federal Size Limitations

Thanks

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Smart Big Government folks up there in NY.

My favorite spots to stop are the roadside "Text Stops".

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Smart Big Government folks up there in NY.

My favorite spots to stop are the roadside "Text Stops".

I almost died laughing the first time I saw that. I don't know who's pulling in there to text with the line of trucks parking on the side of the road.

Donna M.'s Comment
member avatar

Do y’all really pull into text spots?

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Smart Big Government folks up there in NY.

My favorite spots to stop are the roadside "Text Stops".

Mine as well. Fast in and out and reasonably quiet

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Do y’all really pull into text spots?

I sure do. Lots of other drivers do, too. All the ones I've used have trash cans there, so they know people aren't just stopping to text.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I've spent many a night sleeping in those spots.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I use them all the time for my 30 minute break. If I’m tired, I’ll jump in the bink for 30, and then roll on. If not, I’ll snack on something, play on the phone, etc.

I also spend nights there. Even with trucks driving by, it’s quieter than a lot of truck stops, and you can be rolling again in a minute or two.

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