Failed My Backing...is This The End?

Topic 26809 | Page 2

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Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Please forgive my misunderstanding. Are you saying you completed a 160-hour course (with the exception of testing) and then you were given tests each day for ten days and were unable to pass nine times?

Are you also saying that, from a stopped location, directly in front of a parking spot or dock, you could not back straight into the hole, using no more than two get-out-and-looks?

I’m just trying to get a better understanding.

Phishtech's Comment
member avatar

I thought for sure she would say it was Schneider. We only had an actual 2 weeks of driving and pad skills, and those were 1/2 days split with classroom. Not much time to gain confidence and skill for newbies with no experience.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Ryan Baccus's Comment
member avatar

At TransTech in Charlotte we have 4 days of backing with some pretrip thrown in there our class was split it was only 6 in my class 3 so we had a chance to do between 50 or 60 backs apiece in 4 days 3went to one site and the rest to the other site, next week we’ll be driving split for 5 days.

I thought for sure she would say it was Schneider. We only had an actual 2 weeks of driving and pad skills, and those were 1/2 days split with classroom. Not much time to gain confidence and skill for newbies with no experience.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jon H.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry this happened to you. Some people take longer for different things to click. I waited a year after getting my CDL to drive truck and trailer. Had to learn to shift and back all over again. Sometimes just figuring it out yourself and failing a few times is the best thing. In real life, you have as many pullups and G.O.A.L.s as you want as long as you don't hit anything. What's hard for some is easy for others and vice versa. Don't give up. You can do this if you really want it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Callie S.'s Comment
member avatar

Prior to testing I was allowed to straight line a total of 3 times, off set 2 times and alley dock about 5 times, then for each day of testing I was allowed 1 practice alley dock before testing, I drove for a total of 11/2 hrs prior to testing...most of my time spent at the school was self study PTI and observation. When it came to the testing I'd never been able to practice all moves on the testing area and of course the switched testing location each day. I also had a motor that malfunctioned during testing ( I told instructor prior to testing that the check engine light was on and was told to continue using the truck) the trucks motor subsequently died during testing and wouldn't stay on...another time when I began testing I noticed the glad hands were not attached and had to attach them causing me to loose time. Ultimately yes I failed my backing 10 times...3 of those I was able to get past the Alley dock, the rest I gave up because I had difficulty resetting after being told to reset, nobody had ever had me set my self up during practice and I'd never reset before. Prior to test 9 I was given an instructor that made it all click and I preformed a perfect Alley dock with zero points...but I'd never been told how to straight line...and I laughingly pointed out on straight line...i never made it to off set....they didn't have us practice until we understood it...and it didn't help that I was 3 days behind everyone else because they lost my drug test...

Please forgive my misunderstanding. Are you saying you completed a 160-hour course (with the exception of testing) and then you were given tests each day for ten days and were unable to pass nine times?

Are you also saying that, from a stopped location, directly in front of a parking spot or dock, you could not back straight into the hole, using no more than two get-out-and-looks?

I’m just trying to get a better understanding.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Callie S.'s Comment
member avatar

what happened to Doug? And according to CRST I'm not under contract with them since they failed to train me effectively.They told me I couldn't return until I got my CDL.

Sounds like nearly th he same thing that happened with Doug a few months ago.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Enter "CRST" in the search bar above and it will come up with many different threads on the subject.

Doug's case was very similar to yours, in that he was suddenly let go by CRST when by all appearances he was improving.

Search "CRST doug" to zero in on his experience. His training experience can be found here:

Doug's CRST training

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I was told by the director that " no amount of practice would help me"
according to CRST I'm not under contract with them since they failed to train me effectively.

Those two statements are really at odds with each other. I'm not sure what really took place here. I'm hearing a lot of blame being put on the poor training, but CRST has been getting all kinds of people trained for years.

When I hear bizarre experiences like this I'm pretty certain something is amiss.

Truck driver training is never what people expect it to be. There is very little time spent behind the wheel before testing. It's fast paced, and it's expected that we learn a lot by observing the others in our course. Personal responsibility is a highly valued trait in this career. The lack of it often shows itself rather quickly in a training situation. Judging just by the comments here, I'm guessing Callie was not prepared for this.

She complains that she wasn't taught to straight line back, and then says...

Prior to testing I was allowed to straight line a total of 3 times

That's precisely what I did in truck driving school. Three straight line backs before testing. That's enough to get the concept.

I'm aggravated with myself for even commenting here. I realize I sound harsh. Friends when you sign up to be a truck driver you must get your game face on. This is full blown competition out here. You've got to make yourself stand out. Callie's experience definitely reminds me of Doug's. I never could see any real determination or drive to excel in his comments, and I tried to goad him in that direction.

In training you've got to own it and make something happen. I honestly think that's what the instructors are looking for. They certainly aren't looking for skills, because nobody has them at that point. They are looking to see if you have the personality to persevere and push yourself beyond your comfort levels. That's what new rookie drivers will be doing on a daily basis for the next year. I'm fairly certain this is what was lacking on Callie's part. She wanted to have her hand held, but they wanted to see her show some serious desire to "git 'er done."

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Ryan Baccus's Comment
member avatar

Old school you’re definitely right it’s fast paced you’re cramming so much stuff in your head your brain will be fried lol, my instructor was telling us I make things harder so I can see how you handle things in difficult situations, the other day I stayed in the truck for about 20 minutes doing the offset it was kicking my I was trying to figure out what I was doing wrong the instructor stayed off to the side so I could figure it out but when he saw that I couldn’t figure it out he came and showed me it was only 1 step that was missing I had everything else right except for that 1 step so afterwards I did the offset 2 times without any problems, my thing is this he said one thing I like about you is that you didn’t give up you were relaxed you weren’t frustrated he said company’s look for individuals like you because you know how to be relaxed in difficult situations. Callie I hope everything works out for you

double-quotes-start.png

I was told by the director that " no amount of practice would help me"

double-quotes-end.png
double-quotes-start.png

according to CRST I'm not under contract with them since they failed to train me effectively.

double-quotes-end.png

Those two statements are really at odds with each other. I'm not sure what really took place here. I'm hearing a lot of blame being put on the poor training, but CRST has been getting all kinds of people trained for years.

When I hear bizarre experiences like this I'm pretty certain something is amiss.

Truck driver training is never what people expect it to be. There is very little time spent behind the wheel before testing. It's fast paced, and it's expected that we learn a lot by observing the others in our course. Personal responsibility is a highly valued trait in this career. The lack of it often shows itself rather quickly in a training situation. Judging just by the comments here, I'm guessing Callie was not prepared for this.

She complains that she wasn't taught to straight line back, and then says...

double-quotes-start.png

Prior to testing I was allowed to straight line a total of 3 times

double-quotes-end.png

That's precisely what I did in truck driving school. Three straight line backs before testing. That's enough to get the concept.

I'm aggravated with myself for even commenting here. I realize I sound harsh. Friends when you sign up to be a truck driver you must get your game face on. This is full blown competition out here. You've got to make yourself stand out. Callie's experience definitely reminds me of Doug's. I never could see any real determination or drive to excel in his comments, and I tried to goad him in that direction.

In training you've got to own it and make something happen. I honestly think that's what the instructors are looking for. They certainly aren't looking for skills, because nobody has them at that point. They are looking to see if you have the personality to persevere and push yourself beyond your comfort levels. That's what new rookie drivers will be doing on a daily basis for the next year. I'm fairly certain this is what was lacking on Callie's part. She wanted to have her hand held, but they wanted to see her show some serious desire to "git 'er done."

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar
he said one thing I like about you is that you didn’t give up you were relaxed you weren’t frustrated he said company’s look for individuals like you because you know how to be relaxed in difficult situations.

Experienced drivers, please correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't orientation and training a continuous interview?

The company, the trainers, and/or a school wants to see that the student can not only develop the skills you need, but that the student also has the temperament to handle challenges and obstacles when you are on your own. And this evaluation would be subjective. So a company or trainer may simply decide they don't have confidence in the student and believe the student can handle the job. So the trainer may not expend the resources on the student so they can pass the test.

In the end, the company or trainer may be wrong about that student, but they will make that decision early on as to how much energy they want to invest.

Callie asked in the subject "is this the end?" It is if you decide it is the end. If you decide otherwise, there are many experienced drivers on this forum that can give you guidance as to your options.

Good luck.

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