Loaner Truck And DM Issues

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Drew Oswalt's Comment
member avatar

Has anyone had to use a loaner truck because their truck was going to be in the shop for a awhile? Or not able to get worked on for a few days?

My situation is that my truck is shut down by safety until it gets it's A & B and Cal-Bit service done. But, people (my DM , other DMs and planners) did not get me scheduled for preventative maintenance. Even though I brought it up multiple times starting about 7-8 days ago. So instead of being on the road, I'll be down until about Tuesday or Wednesday.

Meanwhile, my DM sends me a list of loaner trucks to use until my truck is done getting it's scheduled maintenance. He says I can do local runs for a big box retailer. I check up on what he said. There are a bunch of half truths. They're not really local. They're regional. Not the same thing.

My worry is that I get a load that is not local/regional and they can't find me a load getting back to my truck. This happened to a buddy of mine. His truck was in the shop for an extended period of time and he used to loaner truck to run a load or two. He was supposed to get back to his truck in a couple days. So he didn't bring much in the way of personal effects and food with him. Those couple days turned into 7-8 days. And they didn't have loads to get him to his truck. They even made him sit at a truck stop for 2-3 days. They wouldn't even deadhead him. Or at least drive to the closest terminal. He got ****ed off because they screwed him. He was 5-6 days passed his requested home time request. And was a few days drive from home. They eventually got him a load home. But they had to have another driver drive his truck to a terminal close to him. I don't think they even got it to his home terminal.

I have trust issues with my DM. Quite a few things he tells me are based off of his experience as a driver. But they are incorrect since they are dated. I've requested permission to drive more than 20 miles to get to a truck for my 10 after dropping off. Just to be told there's always plenty of parking at the closer one. Nope. Always full. So I had to go to the one further away any way. But had to waste time calling again to be able to do that. Or got lucky and got a new load right away. There are other things too. But he pretty much makes me waste my time because he isn't doing his job properly, not trusting me with the current and correct information I have, and not pre-planning me. All my other buddies are pre-planned 85-100% of the time from day one. Not me. Only happened twice.

Either he has too many drivers under him, doesn't give a crap or being a DM/DL is not the job for him. I'm always on hold for 20-45+ when I call. All my buddies are rarely on hold. Even then, no more than 10 minutes. No pre-plans. Hasn't really given me information on things I need to know. My buddies had to tell me a lot of information that their DMs taught them.

Anyway, how do you feel about getting into a loaner truck, especially without getting pre-planned.

And should I switch DMs? Regardless, I'm making calls to swap out on Monday. His inactions have already cost me around $3-5k in pay.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Has anyone had to use a loaner truck because their truck was going to be in the shop for a awhile? Or not able to get worked on for a few days?

My situation is that my truck is shut down by safety until it gets it's A & B and Cal-Bit service done. But, people (my DM , other DMs and planners) did not get me scheduled for preventative maintenance. Even though I brought it up multiple times starting about 7-8 days ago. So instead of being on the road, I'll be down until about Tuesday or Wednesday.

Meanwhile, my DM sends me a list of loaner trucks to use until my truck is done getting it's scheduled maintenance. He says I can do local runs for a big box retailer. I check up on what he said. There are a bunch of half truths. They're not really local. They're regional. Not the same thing.

My worry is that I get a load that is not local/regional and they can't find me a load getting back to my truck. This happened to a buddy of mine. His truck was in the shop for an extended period of time and he used to loaner truck to run a load or two. He was supposed to get back to his truck in a couple days. So he didn't bring much in the way of personal effects and food with him. Those couple days turned into 7-8 days. And they didn't have loads to get him to his truck. They even made him sit at a truck stop for 2-3 days. They wouldn't even deadhead him. Or at least drive to the closest terminal. He got ****ed off because they screwed him. He was 5-6 days passed his requested home time request. And was a few days drive from home. They eventually got him a load home. But they had to have another driver drive his truck to a terminal close to him. I don't think they even got it to his home terminal.

I have trust issues with my DM. Quite a few things he tells me are based off of his experience as a driver. But they are incorrect since they are dated. I've requested permission to drive more than 20 miles to get to a truck for my 10 after dropping off. Just to be told there's always plenty of parking at the closer one. Nope. Always full. So I had to go to the one further away any way. But had to waste time calling again to be able to do that. Or got lucky and got a new load right away. There are other things too. But he pretty much makes me waste my time because he isn't doing his job properly, not trusting me with the current and correct information I have, and not pre-planning me. All my other buddies are pre-planned 85-100% of the time from day one. Not me. Only happened twice.

Either he has too many drivers under him, doesn't give a crap or being a DM/DL is not the job for him. I'm always on hold for 20-45+ when I call. All my buddies are rarely on hold. Even then, no more than 10 minutes. No pre-plans. Hasn't really given me information on things I need to know. My buddies had to tell me a lot of information that their DMs taught them.

Anyway, how do you feel about getting into a loaner truck, especially without getting pre-planned.

And should I switch DMs? Regardless, I'm making calls to swap out on Monday. His inactions have already cost me around $3-5k in pay.

I have used a loaner twice. The first time, I got stuck out for a week for what was supposed to be a couple of days. But when I told my dispatcher I needed to get home, they got me home right away. Our company is known for that.

After the second time, I refused. Every drivers truck I have gotten into is disgusting. I refuse to ride in someone else’s filth again. But, I can (kind of) afford to not work.

You will have to decide for yourself which you care more about, driving and earning, or waiting for your truck.

I’ve already told them aim not driving someone else’s truck again, and they respected that.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Drew Oswalt's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Has anyone had to use a loaner truck because their truck was going to be in the shop for a awhile? Or not able to get worked on for a few days?

My situation is that my truck is shut down by safety until it gets it's A & B and Cal-Bit service done. But, people (my DM , other DMs and planners) did not get me scheduled for preventative maintenance. Even though I brought it up multiple times starting about 7-8 days ago. So instead of being on the road, I'll be down until about Tuesday or Wednesday.

Meanwhile, my DM sends me a list of loaner trucks to use until my truck is done getting it's scheduled maintenance. He says I can do local runs for a big box retailer. I check up on what he said. There are a bunch of half truths. They're not really local. They're regional. Not the same thing.

My worry is that I get a load that is not local/regional and they can't find me a load getting back to my truck. This happened to a buddy of mine. His truck was in the shop for an extended period of time and he used to loaner truck to run a load or two. He was supposed to get back to his truck in a couple days. So he didn't bring much in the way of personal effects and food with him. Those couple days turned into 7-8 days. And they didn't have loads to get him to his truck. They even made him sit at a truck stop for 2-3 days. They wouldn't even deadhead him. Or at least drive to the closest terminal. He got ****ed off because they screwed him. He was 5-6 days passed his requested home time request. And was a few days drive from home. They eventually got him a load home. But they had to have another driver drive his truck to a terminal close to him. I don't think they even got it to his home terminal.

I have trust issues with my DM. Quite a few things he tells me are based off of his experience as a driver. But they are incorrect since they are dated. I've requested permission to drive more than 20 miles to get to a truck for my 10 after dropping off. Just to be told there's always plenty of parking at the closer one. Nope. Always full. So I had to go to the one further away any way. But had to waste time calling again to be able to do that. Or got lucky and got a new load right away. There are other things too. But he pretty much makes me waste my time because he isn't doing his job properly, not trusting me with the current and correct information I have, and not pre-planning me. All my other buddies are pre-planned 85-100% of the time from day one. Not me. Only happened twice.

Either he has too many drivers under him, doesn't give a crap or being a DM/DL is not the job for him. I'm always on hold for 20-45+ when I call. All my buddies are rarely on hold. Even then, no more than 10 minutes. No pre-plans. Hasn't really given me information on things I need to know. My buddies had to tell me a lot of information that their DMs taught them.

Anyway, how do you feel about getting into a loaner truck, especially without getting pre-planned.

And should I switch DMs? Regardless, I'm making calls to swap out on Monday. His inactions have already cost me around $3-5k in pay.

double-quotes-end.png

I have used a loaner twice. The first time, I got stuck out for a week for what was supposed to be a couple of days. But when I told my dispatcher I needed to get home, they got me home right away. Our company is known for that.

After the second time, I refused. Every drivers truck I have gotten into is disgusting. I refuse to ride in someone else’s filth again. But, I can (kind of) afford to not work.

You will have to decide for yourself which you care more about, driving and earning, or waiting for your truck.

I’ve already told them aim not driving someone else’s truck again, and they respected that.

Yes. Other driver's filth. I forgot to mention that. My current truck was nasty. Spent a whole day cleaning it. And still am getting to areas I don't really touch, once a week, just to try and get it his filth 100% gone. I takes 4-5 Clorox wipes to clean a 6"x6" area. Dude never cleaned his truck, looks like he smoked his butter popcorn swishers, (found wrappers) with the windows up and he even put those nasty things out on the side of the cabinet and even around the cup holders, instead of an ashtray....

My wife makes more money than I do. But it doesn't matter. We're trying to save money for a down payment for a house plus rainy day money, etc.

I want to drive, but you know what? I'm pretty angry right now that I'm in this situation because the staff in the office just doesn't give a f***. And that I was sitting for about 58 hours earlier in the week because they were "light on loads" and only got $50 for it. So I think it's better that I don't drive for a day or two.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Drew, you're having rookie issues that you can do a much better job of resolving. First off, quit calling your DM so much. Would it surprise you that I seldom speak to my DM?

Use your Qualcomm. Send in your macros, and then send free form messages indicating how long you've been sitting and waiting on a load. That way the planners see that you are not being utilized properly. There's not a shred of evidence that your DM is not getting things accomplished when you are talking to them on the phone, plus it is a real drain on them to deal with rookie drivers who call them all the time.

Keep sending requests for a load on your Quallcomm. You can send him a new one every hour if you like, but do it on the Qualcomm if you want results. Do you guys have a macro that indicates you are available for a load? I'm sure you do - use it.

Most of us have had to use loaner trucks. I used one for several weeks once. I didn't care where they sent me - just keep me busy. When it was possible they routed me back to my truck and I kept moving. It's logistics - it's not perfect - we learn to roll with the punches.

Top Tier Drivers learn that they can change their own destiny by doing things a certain way. It's easy to blame your DM, but it takes some humility to admit that there's probably a better way for you to do things. Your actions can definitely make their efforts more or less effective. I had a DM at Western that I didn't really care for, but I knew how to work their system so that I could hold him accountable. Consequently he kept me very busy, and at the same time I was making his job easier for him. You've got to figure that out.

I think you can't complain that they aren't keeping you busy while at the same time you say they won't schedule you for maintenance. You don't seem happy with whatever they are doing with you. I always help my DM know when I need service and will help him with understanding the best time to route me in for that. I usually start the reminders at about four thousand miles prior to the scheduled time. I don't use the telephone to do that.

Also, why do you ask them where to park? I've never bothered with such trivialities. If one place is full, I move on to the next.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Drew, you're having rookie issues that you can do a much better job of resolving. First off, quit calling your DM so much. Would it surprise you that I seldom speak to my DM?

Use your Qualcomm. Send in your macros, and then send free form messages indicating how long you've been sitting and waiting on a load. That way the planners see that you are not being utilized properly. There's not a shred of evidence that your DM is not getting things accomplished when you are talking to them on the phone, plus it is a real drain on them to deal with rookie drivers who call them all the time.

Keep sending requests for a load on your Quallcomm. You can send him a new one every hour if you like, but do it on the Qualcomm if you want results. Do you guys have a macro that indicates you are available for a load? I'm sure you do - use it.

Most of us have had to use loaner trucks. I used one for several weeks once. I didn't care where they sent me - just keep me busy. When it was possible they routed me back to my truck and I kept moving. It's logistics - it's not perfect - we learn to roll with the punches.

Top Tier Drivers learn that they can change their own destiny by doing things a certain way. It's easy to blame your DM, but it takes some humility to admit that there's probably a better way for you to do things. Your actions can definitely make their efforts more or less effective. I had a DM at Western that I didn't really care for, but I knew how to work their system so that I could hold him accountable. Consequently he kept me very busy, and at the same time I was making his job easier for him. You've got to figure that out.

I think you can't complain that they aren't keeping you busy while at the same time you say they won't schedule you for maintenance. You don't seem happy with whatever they are doing with you. I always help my DM know when I need service and will help him with understanding the best time to route me in for that. I usually start the reminders at about four thousand miles prior to the scheduled time. I don't use the telephone to do that.

Also, why do you ask them where to park? I've never bothered with such trivialities. If one place is full, I move on to the next.

Definitely learn to use the Qualcomm, it’s your key you keeping busy. And everything is on the record. I try to never call unless absolutely necessary.

I messaged my dispatcher last week and told him I needed service, I’m being loaded now to head to the yard. Do they put a sticker somewhere so you know when service is due?

I agree, I park wherever I want as long as it is a safe, legal spot. If they don’t have me preplanned, I head to the nearest spot I send s message that I am empty with no load, and head to the nearest spot I can find.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Drew Oswalt's Comment
member avatar

Drew, you're having rookie issues that you can do a much better job of resolving. First off, quit calling your DM so much. Would it surprise you that I seldom speak to my DM?

Use your Qualcomm. Send in your macros, and then send free form messages indicating how long you've been sitting and waiting on a load. That way the planners see that you are not being utilized properly. There's not a shred of evidence that your DM is not getting things accomplished when you are talking to them on the phone, plus it is a real drain on them to deal with rookie drivers who call them all the time.

Keep sending requests for a load on your Quallcomm. You can send him a new one every hour if you like, but do it on the Qualcomm if you want results. Do you guys have a macro that indicates you are available for a load? I'm sure you do - use it.

Most of us have had to use loaner trucks. I used one for several weeks once. I didn't care where they sent me - just keep me busy. When it was possible they routed me back to my truck and I kept moving. It's logistics - it's not perfect - we learn to roll with the punches.

Top Tier Drivers learn that they can change their own destiny by doing things a certain way. It's easy to blame your DM, but it takes some humility to admit that there's probably a better way for you to do things. Your actions can definitely make their efforts more or less effective. I had a DM at Western that I didn't really care for, but I knew how to work their system so that I could hold him accountable. Consequently he kept me very busy, and at the same time I was making his job easier for him. You've got to figure that out.

I think you can't complain that they aren't keeping you busy while at the same time you say they won't schedule you for maintenance. You don't seem happy with whatever they are doing with you. I always help my DM know when I need service and will help him with understanding the best time to route me in for that. I usually start the reminders at about four thousand miles prior to the scheduled time. I don't use the telephone to do that.

Also, why do you ask them where to park? I've never bothered with such trivialities. If one place is full, I move on to the next.

Please don't assume anything because I'm a rookie. I don't know a lot. I mean a lot of things regarding trucking. But I know enough about how things work at the company I drive for. I ask a lot of questions to office and shop staff. I ask other Swift drivers questions too. But only take something as fact if I get the same answer from a majority of them

I only call my DM a few times a week. I Qualcomm him and never get a response. Always wait a good amount of time. So yeah, I have to call.

When I was sitting in Lubbock forever, I did my macros to let them know I'm available.

Or system shows we are due for maintenance. A and B service can be overridden so I can keep getting loads. Cal-Bit cannot be overridden. There is a "safety hold" on my truck. So yeah, I'm not happy they did not schedule me. And he never pre-plans me. I talk to 3 people, that I went to driving school with, on a daily basis. And they talk to other people we went to school with. Pretty much everyone gets preplanned.

And yes, I have to get permission to get to a truck stop over 20 miles from where I drop off. I did so one time and got in trouble. It's a company policy.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

How long have you had this dispatcher?

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
midnight fox's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I want to drive, but you know what? I'm pretty angry right now that I'm in this situation because the staff in the office just doesn't give a f***. And that I was sitting for about 58 hours earlier in the week because they were "light on loads" and only got $50 for it. So I think it's better that I don't drive for a day or two.

So are you going to stay at the terminal?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Drew Oswalt's Comment
member avatar

How long have you had this dispatcher?

About 2 months.

I'm not the only one having issues with him. I don't know if it was monthly or quarterly stats. But there is a board in the office at my home terminal with driver manager/leader stats. My driver manager had a 77% driver retention rate. Bottom. Out of 5 or 6. 4 had 100% retention. Someone else wasn't 100%, but higher than him. Total miles for their drivers, my DM was 4th or 5th. I forget the other categories. But all towards the bottom if not last. Similar last month. I didn't want to bring this up because it's internal. And I tried to ignore the numbers so I wouldn't be biased against him. But just so everyone knows what I'm dealing with. And I'm not the only driver that has or is planning on dropping him.

Also, with the phone thing. Me, along with all my buddies are on the phone with a DM or planner several times a week. They call us. And they want us to call them. The say it. We are all new and they check in on us. And we can't really can't send a Qualcomm message or read them when we are driving. We're locked out.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Cantankerous Amicus's Comment
member avatar

Also, with the phone thing. Me, along with all my buddies are on the phone with a DM or planner several times a week. They call us. And they want us to call them. The say it. We are all new and they check in on us. And we can't really can't send a Qualcomm message or read them when we are driving. We're locked out.

But you can call them when you are driving?

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

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Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

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