PRIME INC TNT Student In Need Of New Trainer...

Topic 27074 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
TruckingAndPuppies's Comment
member avatar

Hey there everyone. Newbie to the road I’m currently in my TNT phase of my PRIME INC training. I need a new trainer as the one I have right now is really not a good match. However, my higher ups will not give me a new one, or are telling me it’s impossible to get me a new one right now—but my driver friends in this company are saying absolutely otherwise and I should have a new trainer before the end of a week.

I’m going to get off of my current trainers truck in a few days because I just can’t do it anymore with her. We just don’t work well together and our personalities are so different that it makes me nervous to even say anything at all to her. Without getting into it too much—were just not meant to be on a truck together—teaming or training.

So my question is—if the TNT matcher and my fleet manager want to keep bullying me about this, who do I go to next? Someone said HR. So I guess I will call them next.

I’m just really nervous about getting off because my trainer has quite the temper and I’m just very nonconfrontational and want to slip off as peacefully as possible.

Also is it really that hard to find a new trainer? I’m not a difficult person, I’ve done 10,000 Mi so far, and I LOVE the job. I just wanna be with a considerate trainer who doesn’t hate their job :(.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Pete E Pothole's Comment
member avatar

Bullying you? Saying that it's not possible immediately is not bullying you. On the new trainer bit, if you really think about it, the time you are with them is a short amount of time if you plan to do this for years. Make yourself do it, there will be many many things out here on the road that will be uncomfortable. Power through it, get it done, get your truck and roll on.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I like what Pete E. Pothole says about "there will be many many things out here on the road that will be uncomfortable. This is true. There will be times that things will go down in a way you may not like. But it's part of the job. Sometimes by people you must work with, sometimes from bad luck with your equipment, sometimes it's traffic & road conditions - they are all part of the mix, along with the part you really love. I'm not saying you will suffer or get bullied around all the time, no. And if you say I LOVE the job! then you need to take the whole nine yards, warts and pearls all together.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Welcome, TruckingAndPuppies.

First, let me say that I totally agree with you - training would be more fun with a trainer you enjoy. But keep in mind, this is a job you're being paid to do. Your trainer is not your personal tour guide escorting you around the country on vacation. You're being paid to learn how to drive a truck. It won't be a bed of roses all the time. You shouldn't expect it to be.

You'll come across plenty of people out there that don't like truck drivers and will not treat you well. People will cut you off, flip you off, and let you sit in the parking lot for hours until they feel like getting to you. That's just the tougher part of life as a driver. If you can learn how to get along with people that aren't the most agreeable folks it will help your career tremendously. You'll get more favors, you'll accomplish more, and you'll have more fun doing it.

I agree with Pete. You'll only be in training for a short while longer. Learn to get along as well as possible and try not to let anything bother you. These will be important skills you will need if you want to be a truck driver for years to come. You'll come across disagreeable people from time to time. Running away isn't a viable option most of the time. Making the best of it is a skill that will help you the rest of your life.

TruckingAndPuppies's Comment
member avatar

So even though she **** talked me on the phone to her friends after I went to my fleet manager the first time, insulted me multiple times, gave away personal information about why I need to go home, and told me what I can and can’t say to her because it makes her angry (even though I was simply saying we should calm down and talk about what had happened with another trucker in a truck stop while I was asleep in the back) , I should suck it up and deal with her terrible attitude? She screamed twice about how much she hates her job and can’t wait to get off this truck, and how much she hates how her students are “always trying to make her life hard.” When all I’m doing is trying to learn.

Bullying you? Saying that it's not possible immediately is not bullying you. On the new trainer bit, if you really think about it, the time you are with them is a short amount of time if you plan to do this for years. Make yourself do it, there will be many many things out here on the road that will be uncomfortable. Power through it, get it done, get your truck and roll on.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
member avatar

Erroll and Brett... well said.

I could carry on, but I won't. Welcome to the forum. Wish you well.

ps: Where's Kearsey and Susan when we need'em?!?!? ;)

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I hear what you're saying. I get it. You're not having much fun with this person right now. I would rather be with someone I can have fun with, too. We all would.

What we'd like to help you understand is that getting along with disagreeable people is an important part of having success in this industry. That's the reality. You can view this as an opportunity. Figure out how to keep learning your trade and keep things as agreeable as possible. Learn what makes this person tick and see if you can develop a better relationship. It's totally possible. You just have to find the right key to this lock. If you can do that, you'll be a better person and a better driver for it.

Also, keep in mind that the next trainer might be much worse. Trust me, there are much worse out there.

I'm going to encourage you to make this work. Take it as your mission to get along and keep things cool. The best thing you can do is figure out what's upsetting your trainer and show some empathy. We all tend to focus on ourselves and our own feelings, which is why you guys are butting heads. You're focused on you, she's focused on her. You both think the other is the cause of your grief and doesn't care how you feel.

Take the initiative to ask your trainer about her life, her feelings, her frustrations. Let her talk about herself for a while. Show that you understand and that you're hoping to make this experience the best you can for her. If you can do that she's far more likely to do the same for you, or at least be far more agreeable.

If you really feel this is more than you can bear then try again to request a new trainer. Personally I'd like to see you learn how to make this work, but more importantly, I want you to stick with trucking and continue with your career.

TruckingAndPuppies's Comment
member avatar

I’m sorry I don’t think this is at a point where we can work it out. We are both too different and come from backgrounds that clash. She comes from a really hard and loud background, I come from a quiet, tolerant home.

I wouldn’t ask for another trainer if I couldn’t actually handle this. But I can see us eventually exploding on each other with how we are. Trust me I am a VERY patient person. So when I feel this way—it’s time to stop.

I know this job entails a lot of a-holes and jerks. Trust me I’ve dealt with them every day of my life before this job. I’m not a sensitive snowflake. I just stay really chilled out and keep my calm. But I’m too relaxed and calm for her, she prefers to be loud and super assertive. We’re just two very different people. I also don’t appreciate the things she says to me/ has said.

So I will remove myself from this situation. Thank you all for your advice. Hopefully they will have a new trainer for me.

I hear what you're saying. I get it. You're not having much fun with this person right now. I would rather be with someone I can have fun with, too. We all would.

What we'd like to help you understand is that getting along with disagreeable people is an important part of having success in this industry. That's the reality. You can view this as an opportunity. Figure out how to keep learning your trade and keep things as agreeable as possible. Learn what makes this person tick and see if you can develop a better relationship. It's totally possible. You just have to find the right key to this lock. If you can do that, you'll be a better person and a better driver for it.

Also, keep in mind that the next trainer might be much worse. Trust me, there are much worse out there.

I'm going to encourage you to make this work. Take it as your mission to get along and keep things cool. The best thing you can do is figure out what's upsetting your trainer and show some empathy. We all tend to focus on ourselves and our own feelings, which is why you guys are butting heads. You're focused on you, she's focused on her. You both think the other is the cause of your grief and doesn't care how you feel.

Take the initiative to ask your trainer about her life, her feelings, her frustrations. Let her talk about herself for a while. Show that you understand and that you're hoping to make this experience the best you can for her. If you can do that she's far more likely to do the same for you, or at least be far more agreeable.

If you really feel this is more than you can bear then try again to request a new trainer. Personally I'd like to see you learn how to make this work, but more importantly, I want you to stick with trucking and continue with your career.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Well, I wish you luck, and I hope you'll keep us updated on this situation. We'd love to help any way we can.

if the TNT matcher and my fleet manager want to keep bullying me about this, who do I go to next? Someone said HR. So I guess I will call them next.

I don't think changing trainers is a big deal, but I worry that your company might label you as a problem if you make too much of a fuss, ya know what I mean? I think you can make this happen, but it's super important that you handle it the right way. Stay cool and professional. Don't start making demands or threatening people or anything like that.

I'm only saying this because I don't know you and I want to make sure you're aware that your situation is tenuous as a recruit in training. You don't carry the authority that a ten-year veteran does, so play it cool. Be humble, be kind, and just explain how you feel. Don't impose your will or show them who's boss. We've watched people raise hell only to wind up on a bus home that day. I don't want to see that happen to you.

Keep us updated and best of luck!

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

TruckingAndPuppies's Comment
member avatar

The page glitched on me the first time so let me also include that she said she doesn’t want to talk to me about anything—empathy towards her seems to upset her. Any time I show empathy or try to understand her she hates it. She “grew up hard” and I suppose she doesn’t care about strangers trying to understand.

So that’s another way we clash. Like I said. We can’t work or live together. I’ve been patient but I’m at the end of my rope.

I’m sorry I don’t think this is at a point where we can work it out. We are both too different and come from backgrounds that clash. She comes from a really hard and loud background, I come from a quiet, tolerant home.

I wouldn’t ask for another trainer if I couldn’t actually handle this. But I can see us eventually exploding on each other with how we are. Trust me I am a VERY patient person. So when I feel this way—it’s time to stop.

I know this job entails a lot of a-holes and jerks. Trust me I’ve dealt with them every day of my life before this job. I’m not a sensitive snowflake. I just stay really chilled out and keep my calm. But I’m too relaxed and calm for her, she prefers to be loud and super assertive. We’re just two very different people. I also don’t appreciate the things she says to me/ has said.

So I will remove myself from this situation. Thank you all for your advice. Hopefully they will have a new trainer for me.

double-quotes-start.png

I hear what you're saying. I get it. You're not having much fun with this person right now. I would rather be with someone I can have fun with, too. We all would.

What we'd like to help you understand is that getting along with disagreeable people is an important part of having success in this industry. That's the reality. You can view this as an opportunity. Figure out how to keep learning your trade and keep things as agreeable as possible. Learn what makes this person tick and see if you can develop a better relationship. It's totally possible. You just have to find the right key to this lock. If you can do that, you'll be a better person and a better driver for it.

Also, keep in mind that the next trainer might be much worse. Trust me, there are much worse out there.

I'm going to encourage you to make this work. Take it as your mission to get along and keep things cool. The best thing you can do is figure out what's upsetting your trainer and show some empathy. We all tend to focus on ourselves and our own feelings, which is why you guys are butting heads. You're focused on you, she's focused on her. You both think the other is the cause of your grief and doesn't care how you feel.

Take the initiative to ask your trainer about her life, her feelings, her frustrations. Let her talk about herself for a while. Show that you understand and that you're hoping to make this experience the best you can for her. If you can do that she's far more likely to do the same for you, or at least be far more agreeable.

If you really feel this is more than you can bear then try again to request a new trainer. Personally I'd like to see you learn how to make this work, but more importantly, I want you to stick with trucking and continue with your career.

double-quotes-end.png
Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More