Backing Help Needed: Turning Front Vs. Back Of Trailer

Topic 27081 | Page 6

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Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

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Marc wrote:

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We both laugh. He gave me some "moves" for a tailgater. Slowed from 55 to 50. When that didn't work it was flashers and 45. He backed off a bit, then repeated it and so did we. After someone else passed us both he finally passed us.

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I’d like to hear what Veriha’s Safety Director would say about the above “move”. I doubt “laughter” would be a part of his assessment.

It’s neither smart or safe; and can serve only to escalate into a potentially dangerous situation for you Marc. Our job is to stay out of trouble on the highways and interstates, not provoke or antagonize. Also realize that an overzealous LEO can write a citation for obstructing the flow of traffic if they observe something like this.

I encourage you NOT to practice this type of behavior no matter how funny it may seem and focus primarily on managing the space in front of you, next to you and not become distracted by a tailgating 4-wheeler or CMV.

Be safe.

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I’m confused. Everything I have seen or have been told was to do exactly that when someone is tailgating me. Slow down to increase my following distance in case I have to stop, and to allow the tailgater to pass.

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Slowing to 45mph ??? No confusion there. It’s an antagonistic move, unsafe.

I stand by what I wrote and agree with Errol’s reply.

Well, yeah, 45 might be a little much.

Personally, I let them tailgate. Not my CDL at risk if I have to stop and they hit me. I concentrate on driving my truck. No one else’s driving concerns me unless it interferes with me getting safely to my destination

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar
Personally, I let them tailgate. Not my CDL at risk if I have to stop and they hit me. I concentrate on driving my truck. No one else’s driving concerns me unless it interferes with me getting safely to my destination

Exactly.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Miss Ed's Comment
member avatar

I'm having a terrible time learning the 90, too. Tomorrow is our last class day (local community college), and I am scheduled for my testing at DMV (North Carolina) on Wednesday. My instructor is going to work with me some tomorrow afternoon.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Marc clarifies.

But the "moves" he taught were designed as space management and had NOTHING to do with road rage.

Actually the moves your trainer taught you are very close to the CDL test question about what do you do if someone tailgates you.

The correct answer is that you increase your following distance - the space in front of you. The reason to do this is to make room for your tailgaiter to safely get in front of you.

"Road Rage" is the ultimate symptom of distracted driving. Every driver's job is to drive safely. Whether you look at your cellphone or are staring at the slow driver ahead of you and gritting your teeth, you are distracted.

That's also why I recommend that line about "Drive Your Own Road". Don't waste your time and attention on other drivers if they are not in your field of attention.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PlanB's Comment
member avatar

I believe the reason we increase following distance is to give ourselves a larger area to slow down so we do not have to brake as hard in the event the vehicle we are following slows. Hard braking while being tailgated could easily end in a collision.

We're not giving them an invitation to pass. We're creating additional buffer space for our own safety.

The correct answer is that you increase your following distance - the space in front of you. The reason to do this is to make room for your tailgaiter to safely get in front of you.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar
I believe the reason we increase following distance is to give ourselves a larger area to slow down so we do not have to brake as hard in the event the vehicle we are following slows. Hard braking while being tailgated could easily end in a collision.

True, you can't have too much space to the next vehicle in front of you. (Here's a secret: the total difference in the amount of space in front of you, as in too close or far enough, adds only seconds to your total travel time.)

The official answer to the CDL test question is to "increase your following distance." There is no official explanation that I've found, even in the CDL manual. But I figured this will prepare a place ahead of you if Speedy Gonzales behind you makes a move.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

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I believe the reason we increase following distance is to give ourselves a larger area to slow down so we do not have to brake as hard in the event the vehicle we are following slows. Hard braking while being tailgated could easily end in a collision.

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True, you can't have too much space to the next vehicle in front of you. (Here's a secret: the total difference in the amount of space in front of you, as in too close or far enough, adds only seconds to your total travel time.)

The official answer to the CDL test question is to "increase your following distance." There is no official explanation that I've found, even in the CDL manual. But I figured this will prepare a place ahead of you if Speedy Gonzales behind you makes a move.

I would (like to think) that would help with a conversation with Officer Leo!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Marc clarifies.

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But the "moves" he taught were designed as space management and had NOTHING to do with road rage.

double-quotes-end.png

Actually the moves your trainer taught you are very close to the CDL test question about what do you do if someone tailgates you.

The correct answer is that you increase your following distance - the space in front of you. The reason to do this is to make room for your tailgaiter to safely get in front of you.

"Road Rage" is the ultimate symptom of distracted driving. Every driver's job is to drive safely. Whether you look at your cellphone or are staring at the slow driver ahead of you and gritting your teeth, you are distracted.

That's also why I recommend that line about "Drive Your Own Road". Don't waste your time and attention on other drivers if they are not in your field of attention.

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CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

A healthy dose of Common Sense is also applicable for handling the tailgating issue. In a roundabout way, several drivers replied as such.

Marc I think (hope) you know the difference between increasing following distance to compensate for a tailgater and deliberately trying to antagonize them. Dumping your speed from 55 to 45 (Interstate posted speedS if 65-70) and throwing on the emergencies...at least from my perspective, is the wrong thing to-do. Nothing will convince me otherwise.

No one accused you of road-rage Marc, however the extreme approach adopted by your trainer, could provoke that response from one of your followers. That was Errol’s point.

Considering there was no mention of any vehicles in front of you, that might explain the initial direction of replies here, specifically mine and Errol’s.

Fact is; I rarely concern myself with vehicles following too close, especially 4-wheelers. In the northeast; tailgating is an art form and SOP on all Interstates and highways. I know they are back there. But no one will ever witness me dropping my speed by 20% and putting my emergencies on. That said; I am always acutely aware of following distance due to congestion and the variability of speeds. Always adjusting, but not abruptly or aggressively.

Whenever I read something like you posted, that potentially compromises safety, I will always call it out.

I hope you understand any reply to you or anyone learning is intended to help and guide, with your best interests always considered. Think about it...if you get past training at Veriha; it’s far more likely you’ll continue to engage on thus forum seeking guidance and hopefully offering it. Your trainer? You may never communicate with him again beyond an occasional greeting.

Good luck. Peace.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Thanks G. All good. Just to clarify though, this was 2-lane highway, speed limit only 55. Drop was first to 50, less than 10٪ and then to 45 or 10%. Points all good and will be considered. Glad I learned the technique. Glad I got the advice about not using it as well!

All good.

Peace!

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