Rookie Solo Adventure, Thoughts, Questions, Vent, And Ramble.

Topic 27110 | Page 4

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Delco Dave's Comment
member avatar

In an earlier post a few days ago, I remember Spoonerist said he had to return to terminal to pick up permits, Didnt think much of it at the time, now it makes sense. I’m guessing those permits were for the states the 14’ trailer would be considered oversize.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

In an earlier post a few days ago, I remember Spoonerist said he had to return to terminal to pick up permits, Didnt think much of it at the time, now it makes sense. I’m guessing those permits were for the states the 14’ trailer would be considered oversize.

That would make sense.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Smitty's Comment
member avatar

Hello to a fellow Hamster! Hang in there man, the first little bit was annoying and exhausting. I did a few reefer runs from here to Pharr (fun to say, but McAllen, Texas) before I said no more of this. So the boss got me a curtain van and I've been much happier doing construction materials. Lumber delivers in the daytime!

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Spoonerist 's Comment
member avatar

Hello to a fellow Hamster! Hang in there man, the first little bit was annoying and exhausting. I did a few reefer runs from here to Pharr (fun to say, but McAllen, Texas) before I said no more of this.

Took me a moment to realize the hamster reference! Subdued excitement FTW...

The permit was the Spotted Lantern Fly. I wish I could say: “why yes, it was an oversized permit.”

My dispatch said there would be roads I couldn’t drive on and to only use the company gps. That’s what deposited me on the south side of a low overpass. Short of getting out and measuring the trailer, I assumed that it was the same size I’ve been running out west, especially since it came from there. Fingers crossed I can get a load going west and this will be chalked up as a learning experience without a fine...

Darn, now my worry monster is loose. I’m going back to my professional sleeping.

Good night all.

Cheers,

G

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

At night, the high cube trailer designation numbers started with either one specific number, or two specific numbers.

You need to clarify this with your dispatch ASAP before you end up with a huge fine, or worse. This is one of those things where "just hope for the best" could cost you a bunch of money.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Spoonerist 's Comment
member avatar

At night, the high cube trailer designation numbers started with either one specific number, or two specific numbers.

You need to clarify this with your dispatch ASAP before you end up with a huge fine, or worse. This is one of those things where "just hope for the best" could cost you a bunch of money.

Clarified! Good call. It’s a standard 53’ at 13’6”. They told me how to identify them.

Packrat, thank you very much!

Cheers,

G

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Smitty's Comment
member avatar

Worry monster, well said. I get that one, big time. A couple of years in and I only worry a lot, not every minute. You'll know soon if you can depend on your instincts to keep that trailer out of harm's way. Here's hoping!

Spoonerist 's Comment
member avatar

Good morning all,

My sunny disposition is diminished. So much/many shenanigans. I can see why people burnout so quickly. Everything is different. Every place wants it their way.

The ray of sunshine this morning was the guard that waved me through to turn around.

I had my first Comchek. Frustrating process. This trip is my prelude to going west. I’m ready for familiar scenery. I’m sure I’ll be back OTR soon enough. The wanderlust is strong with this one...

I still love to drive. Once I was away from the last stop I felt ebullient.

Running heavy haul with my mentor certainly prepared me for the driving and backing (which was not very good today, though I had a perfect 90... into the wrong dock...) it didn’t really prepare me for the chaos that seems to be the norm out on OTR. I’m not faulting him or the experience. I have no idea how one would go about teaching or exposing a student to the chaos.

I really have no idea what I don’t know and many “learning/teaching” moments don’t happen until they do.

When I arrived at my shipper one of my headlights went out. I swapped the bulb 3x and finally discovered that the green wire had parted. I submitted a repair request. I offered to fix it myself, but they declined. I’ll be getting that sorted out after this delivery.

Thankfully I’m one of the first trucks in. Less people to witness my exceptional backing skills.

Rant/vent over. I feel better.

Cheers,

G

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

OTR driving is chaos most of the time. It's exhausting, challenging, and ever-changing. That's what makes it such an awesome adventure for the adventurous types who love challenging themselves. That's also what makes it a nightmare for those who are not equipped for that lifestyle or underestimate how difficult trucking is.

Keeping your emotions on an even keel is one of the most important aspects of having a long, successful, enjoyable career out there. As you spend more time out there, you'll come to realize that most of the highly experienced drivers are as miserable and stressed out as The Scrooge, or as pleasant and relaxed as The Buddha. For those who have been out there for more than ten years, there seems to be little in between.

Which camp you end up in depends largely on how you keep score throughout life. If you're an optimistic person who always sees the bright side and counts your blessings you'll find an endless number of blessings that come with this job and lifestyle. If you're the glass-half-empty type who seems to notice that every silver lining has a cloud, you'll find there's no end to the curses that come with this job and lifestyle.

Spoonerist, you're a rather reflective person and you're aware of life's little nuances. That will suit you well in trucking. You'll find a million reasons to love this adventure. But that doesn't mean it won't have it's tougher days or its frustrations. You can handle it all, though. That seems clear.

I really have no idea what I don’t know and many “learning/teaching” moments don’t happen until they do.

That is one of the great truths that applies to all new drivers. It's why we stress that you should stick with your career and your first company for one full year no matter what. We add the 'no matter what' part because of the difficulties everyone will face out there. They can feel overwhelming at times.

I very much enjoy reading your updates. I hope you'll continue.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
EricGuvNC's Comment
member avatar

GREETINGS and SALUTATIONS Spoonerist,

WELCOME ABOARD!!

It's WONDERFUL READING your exploits!

I'm a semi-experienced Driver having been Observing The Reality since early '99.

I dig your linguistics! Illuminating as well entertaining!

Never dealt with Over-Size Loads (Obstructed Sight Lesson), just standard and spread-axle 48' & 53' Skateboard (Flatbed) and Dry Van.

Name on Truck: little importance. Driver in Truck: Major (or General) importance.

States i never visited: Montana North Dakota Oregon South Dakota Vermont Washington

I'm based in North Carolina at Greensboro (which is, like most Cities, losing the Green to Industrialization). My FIRST Long Haul was with a Skateboard Company in South Carolina (Bulldog Hiway Express). Running a Cornbinder (International) with a 10 speed non auto, pulling a 53' spread-axle. Trainer and I went to Pocatello, ID., with a "hot load" (they're all hot loads/hot freight).* That was FUN and we were arguing the entire trip out and back about when who was gonna drive. (That was when we were still coloring Comic Books [Paper Logs]). He told me "You'll have no problem in Trucking since You just wanna Get 'er Done". That's been MY Philosophy: get close to or onsite at the shipper or receiver as conditions permit. *(side note: I drove a few years for a Company called HOT FREIGHT EXPRESS where I liked it better with the E out of freight) Only stop for essentials: Food, Fuel, Toilet, Sleep and of course Repairs. Food: Carry ample supply. (i carried about 30 pounds, mostly canned and dry bulk that wasn't refrigerated.) Fuel: at 1/2 tank (if you believe gauge) or 700-800 miles from last Fuel. (tried to have full tanks b4 loading) Toilet: Preferably not some Off/On Ramp. (emergencies exist especially in Desert and Mountain terrains) Sleep: When/Where feasible. Repairs: sometimes repairs occur where one doesn't wanna be, but such is of The Adventures in Trucking. A few times in my consistent Training, I've "hooked" some trailers to discover that the tug test is best confirmed by "eyes on the prize" instead of "tug test", pulling forward and turning, to drop the trailer, and spend time cranking in low gear. It's been most enjoyable when Trailer was M-T however a few times LDD. NEVER did damage to ANY Landing Gear. Last week I was dropping a trailer: pulled release, disconnected air/electric, got in cab, "did I roll the Legs?", got out, confirmed a NO. Such was the result of not following PROCEDURE; Roll Legs, Pull Pin, Disconnect Lines. YOU'LL DO WELL IN YOUR ADVENTURES!! There is NO LOAD So Hot It Has To Cool off In A Ditch! CHEERS!!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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