Any Companies In New England That Hire New Drivers? And Other Questions...

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scandya's Comment
member avatar

A little bit of background about me first. Im 30 years old, from southern Massachusetts. I plan on having my CDL A sometime around late January. Im currently looking at Schneider as my first choice, as they have a drop yard 50 miles from me. I plan on doing OTR and am pretty sure im going to question why i made this career choice for the first couple months, but i am not really a people person, so I think its a good career move for me. Ive been working at a boat yard for 5 years and have lots of experience hauling boats around on the road, anywhere from 16 to 28 feet long, and 13 feet high. I know a 53 foot trailer is different, but i feel it gives me a leg up... hopefully.

Anyways, a few noob questions. 1. I have seen that some companies allow drivers to take their truck home, barring they live far from a yard. I live on a crowded city road, so this isnt an option for me at all, right? Basically, i need to live close to a yard? Ive got no where else to park a truck, except for on the street. Ive thought about a park and ride, but i feel thats a big no no, for insurance reasons. 2. Are there any drop yards in southern New England besides Schneider and USxpress? Ive tried to do my research here, but i cant find any other companies that have any close to me. 3. Whats the realistic pay like for a new driver? Currently i make around 480 a week, and am completely expecting to make basically the same pay as that, give or take $70ish or so. 4. My topic header. Are there any OTR companies around me that hire new drivers with no experience besides the big name companies? I want to do OTR preferably, or be out for a week or 2 at a time if its regional. Thank you all very much!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Delco Dave's Comment
member avatar

A. Duie Pyle is a NE regional company, they are not a huge carrier but do have a terminal and training center in Mass. They run as far south as Virginia, west to Ohio and north to Maine. They may run into southern Canada as well

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

I'll leave the questions regarding hometime parking for other drivers that do OTR and can speak from their experiences, but regarding the pay we tell people you can expect about $35,000 your first year. We've had members make over $50k their first year, it all depends on how quickly you "get it". Expecting $480 a week shouldn't be a problem at all. If you start on the lower end of pay at say 33 CPM that's only 1500 miles to make $495 which is very easy to do. There are even companies that will pay you more than $480 during training. For example, Prime Inc. Pays $700 a week for your TNT training after you have your CDL. You cant go wrong with any of the Mega carriers and I dont see it being problem getting hired by any of them in the northeast as long as your criminal and driving records are relatively clean.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

ChrisEMT's Comment
member avatar

I live in CT, and I had worked for Werner for 4 years. I never had a problem where to park, because they will allow you to park at a truck stop for home time, unless you had a "high value load", then you would have to drop the trailer at a secured lot, but they have them all over the country. They always try to get you a load close to your home to deliver just before or after your home time, depending on how long you were going to be home....

The big thing to remember, no matter what company you go with, is communicate with your DM/FM/Load Planner. Also, something else to look into for companies you have narrowed your choices to, is visit local truck stops at meal time, usually breakfast or dinner/supper time around 6 am or 6 pm and see if the company drivers can or will tell you if they have dedicated accounts in your area. For example, I got onto a dedicated account out of Vermont, averaged 2200-2500 miles a week, and averaged 1100-1300 week, and I was home here in CT every weekend, usually noontime Friday until about 10 am on Sunday, and my relationship with my manager was great, and he knew that if he needed someone to deliver a difficult load or a long distance load, he could count on me and a couple other drivers. And also, he knew that the same drivers would do longer loads and stay out for 2 weeks at a time if needed, and we were compensated well for it....

Pyle and Schneider are both good carriers to work for, I know several people who work for them, and they are very happy working there.

Like Rob T said, you will not go wrong with any of the major carriers. As soon as you "get it" and get into your own groove, the sky is the limit with wait you can earn. I have seen people post that their first year earnings ranged from $35k to over $50k their first year. From your second year on, most drivers I know see an average of 10%-25% increase in pay every year.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

We hire for northeast hourly, and have a few spots reserved in Westfield MA for parking.

scandya's Comment
member avatar

Thanks everyone for your help. Ive ultimately decided to go with Schneider as my next employer. I called a few companies located within 20 or so miles of me, but they all required 2 years of experience. The goal is to grind out for 2 years then switch closer to home.

I feel like I'm going to really dislike OTR for a couple of months and curse myself for even considering this a career. Lol I'm going to give it my all though and do the best I can!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

Did you try TMC. I don’t know if they hire in your area but I see them pulling boats sometimes. SOLO rookies make good money there. Solo I’ve heard.

scandya's Comment
member avatar

Did you try TMC. I don’t know if they hire in your area but I see them pulling boats sometimes. SOLO rookies make good money there. Solo I’ve heard.

I just looked into them a bit, checked out their page and whatnot. I didnt want to start off doing flatbed, and they are a good deal further from where I live. I will probably still give em a call when im in CDL school and see what they have to offer.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

If hometime is your concern I get that. Having a terminal near home probably does help in some situations but it probably doesn’t matter to much. What matters is the freight lanes they run and the accounts, customers and so on. I was offered a different job within my company and they said I was on the fringe of the hiring zone. They said I’d still get home weekends but because I understood the freight lanes of this account they offered me I could see how hard and out of route it would be for me. So I passed on that. I thought about this when I was in school and passed on maverick because there terminal was so far from my house. After I went solo and started parking at a local business for the weekends there would always be a maverick truck sitting there and always home before me. What matters is what the company says they can do for you as far as home time goes. Maverick said I’d be home most weekends but I didn’t trust them due to where they was located. I was wrong. The company I settled on has gotten me home every weekend and for every holiday for three years now. They said they would and they did.

double-quotes-start.png

Did you try TMC. I don’t know if they hire in your area but I see them pulling boats sometimes. SOLO rookies make good money there. Solo I’ve heard.

double-quotes-end.png

I just looked into them a bit, checked out their page and whatnot. I didnt want to start off doing flatbed, and they are a good deal further from where I live. I will probably still give em a call when im in CDL school and see what they have to offer.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

scandya's Comment
member avatar

Ive actually looked into TMC quite a bit last night, and I honestly think I will try them fresh out of school. Ive watched many videos from their drivers on YT, and so far so good. Sitting pulling dry or reefer all day just drop and hook sounds less appealing to me than flatbed. It seems more hands on and diverse, which I feel Id like more. I appreciate you telling me about them. As for hometime, thats no concern of mine right now. The concern to me was having a place to park the truck where I live. I live in a typical northeastern city with narrow roads that 2 cars can barely fit down. Think Boston, or some other crammed city. Ive actually seen a few flatbeds, dry vans and bobtails parked at the grocery store I go to, so maybe thats an option for me. Im going to call them Monday and flesh out the details and see what they say. Monday also happens to be the day I start CDL school, so hopefully its a good day for me!

If hometime is your concern I get that. Having a terminal near home probably does help in some situations but it probably doesn’t matter to much. What matters is the freight lanes they run and the accounts, customers and so on. I was offered a different job within my company and they said I was on the fringe of the hiring zone. They said I’d still get home weekends but because I understood the freight lanes of this account they offered me I could see how hard and out of route it would be for me. So I passed on that. I thought about this when I was in school and passed on maverick because there terminal was so far from my house. After I went solo and started parking at a local business for the weekends there would always be a maverick truck sitting there and always home before me. What matters is what the company says they can do for you as far as home time goes. Maverick said I’d be home most weekends but I didn’t trust them due to where they was located. I was wrong. The company I settled on has gotten me home every weekend and for every holiday for three years now. They said they would and they did.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Did you try TMC. I don’t know if they hire in your area but I see them pulling boats sometimes. SOLO rookies make good money there. Solo I’ve heard.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I just looked into them a bit, checked out their page and whatnot. I didnt want to start off doing flatbed, and they are a good deal further from where I live. I will probably still give em a call when im in CDL school and see what they have to offer.

double-quotes-end.png

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

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