Asking For Prayers! REALLY Need Them.

Topic 27246 | Page 4

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Turtle's Comment
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Awesome, Victor! You're almost there!

Marc Lee's Comment
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You got this Victor!

smile.gif

G-Town's Comment
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Fantastic Victor! Well done, happy for you.

Tonya M.'s Comment
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Praying for you !!! I claim that you will receive your miracle as well as many financial blessings and that your career be exactly as you hoped and successful! you got this Boss! ;)

So I am at 27.35 hours but I will be able to be dropped off to graduate on the 23rd. My trainer and I have discovered though through a couple of events that there is something wrong with my body or at least we think there might be and so I scheduled a doctors appointment for the 30th at 9:20am. They are going to want to do some blood work to find out whats exactly is dragging me down. So I have been doing great driving and really have improved on my backs and even have gotten the trailers in first try too! However, there have been now two occurrences where when I was operating at night that I became dangerously tired and had to give my trainer the wheel. The first time he thought I was just resting my eyes and I interpreted him wrong and thought he ment just sleep☹. The second time was last night and I had drove 6 hours 61 minutes and surrendered the wheel to him after performing a post trip inspection. When I operated with Swift I never really had a problem like this, though I did drive more during the day and not the night. I want to be a Old School or G-Town and roll like a boss but this has got to be resolved in order for me to be both successful and enjoy my career. Sigh. I was hoping this would not happen🤦‍♂️.

Please keep me in your alls prayers. Im going to travel down to Nashville, Tennessee to graduate as I am going to OTR and I have been advised strongly to do that.

Thanks in advance for the prayers and maybe pray for a straight up miracle!

THANKS!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Thank you very much. It feels amazing to be this close. Only 10.23 more hours and I will be ready to graduate! Excited.

Awesome, Victor! You're almost there!

You got this Victor!

smile.gif

Fantastic Victor! Well done, happy for you.

Praying for you !!! I claim that you will receive your miracle as well as many financial blessings and that your career be exactly as you hoped and successful! you got this Boss! ;)

double-quotes-start.png

So I am at 27.35 hours but I will be able to be dropped off to graduate on the 23rd. My trainer and I have discovered though through a couple of events that there is something wrong with my body or at least we think there might be and so I scheduled a doctors appointment for the 30th at 9:20am. They are going to want to do some blood work to find out whats exactly is dragging me down. So I have been doing great driving and really have improved on my backs and even have gotten the trailers in first try too! However, there have been now two occurrences where when I was operating at night that I became dangerously tired and had to give my trainer the wheel. The first time he thought I was just resting my eyes and I interpreted him wrong and thought he ment just sleep☹. The second time was last night and I had drove 6 hours 61 minutes and surrendered the wheel to him after performing a post trip inspection. When I operated with Swift I never really had a problem like this, though I did drive more during the day and not the night. I want to be a Old School or G-Town and roll like a boss but this has got to be resolved in order for me to be both successful and enjoy my career. Sigh. I was hoping this would not happen🤦‍♂️.

Please keep me in your alls prayers. Im going to travel down to Nashville, Tennessee to graduate as I am going to OTR and I have been advised strongly to do that.

Thanks in advance for the prayers and maybe pray for a straight up miracle!

THANKS!

double-quotes-end.png

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Isabell C.'s Comment
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Everyone has different sleep schedules built in. I'm a natural night owl. Like even when I was a little kid my mom would come into my room at like midnight or later on and find me just lying in bed looking at the ceiling and she'd ask me "why aren't you asleep yet?" I would say "I'm not tired." Some people are morning people. The job I work now starts at 5am I've tried for 2 years straight working it to change my nature, I have prayed to God asking Him to adjust when I feel tired, it's helped a little but honestly I'm ready to give up on that. That's why I'm going into truck driving. You sound like more of a early morning or day driver than someone who would work nights. Hopefully when you go solo you can choose your hours. Think of the times you feel most energized and work during those hours. For me, I feel finally awake at around 7pm and feel really energized until around 4-5am. I'm guessing you're more of the opposite. I'll send you a prayer, maybe God will be more willing to change your nature than mine haha :) Good luck, keep praying and it'll all work out.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Marc Lee's Comment
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Hopefully when you go solo you can choose your hours.

Pros please chime in here...

I would say it depends a lot on the type of trailer and freight, account(s), etc.. Certainly a "home daily" driver could mostly drive nights. But OTR is generally recommended as the best way to start a new career and that is often drive most of 11 hours out of a 14 hour day, take 10 hrs. off and roll again. Pretty much has one driving / resting / sleeping any time of day or night!

shocked.png

(Me too, (night owl) BTW!)

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Marc Lee points out something Isabell wrote ( good catch Marc ! ) ...

Hopefully when you go solo you can choose your hours.

That is rare and not consistent unless you are on a local account or some LTL line-haul or P&D assignments.

Even on a Dedicated or Private Fleet retail account like Walmart (Turtle?); although I am designated as a day-light driver, all that really means is I am dispatched on deliveries that run during daylight (most "dry" grocery which is called Remix or "FDD", freezer, deli, dairy) ...key point; "they dock-out" during daylight. This is a difficult concept for most people to understand or wrap their head around. Thus...I drive at night as much as I drive during daylight hours.

The majority of the time an OTR driver is not going to be able to choose their hours. The freight decides that. OTR drivers (to a lesser extent me) sleep/rest when they can. One day it might be be 19:00-05:00, the very next shift, due to circumstances out of your direct control; your sleep time begins at 24:00 and ends at 10:00. Hopefully other OTR drivers will chime in on this.

Isabell (especially) and Jay, I encourage you to read or reread the following Trucking Truth links:

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

Truck Driver's Career Guide

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Thanks G.

In my 2 weeks OTR we almost always ran as I described... except when it was even worse! One night we parked at the receiver about 22:00, woke up at 03:30, used PC to get to our door for 04:00 live unload. (This was in the middle of our 10-hour "rest" period!) Waited a couple hours after we were unloaded for our next assignment and were running again for the better part of an 11 hour drive out of a 14 hour day which "started" hours after we had to be awake enough to get in and out, etc.. Certainly not the hours we would have picked if given a choice! And certainly not a real 10-hour break.. regardless of day or night driving requirements.

Even running with "home daily" trainer... delays due to missing paperwork (2.5 hours for a BOL on a rejected load, no one at a warehouse on Black Friday where we did a drop and hook / re-drop and re-hook due to missing paperwork)... both of these required declaring a "Big Day" (day-cab, 100 air-mile rule) to get back home. For the later trip trainer drove and we discovered we could each declare a Big Day in the same week even though we were both on duty the whole time the other was driving! (Is "Big Day" driving only? Would think both "lines" driving and OD, and only 1 per week allowed)...

shocked.png

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Rookie Doyenne's Comment
member avatar

Good points, veterans (Marc, my head is spinning from that 2 week descriptive and I mean, STILL! from the first time you posted about it, lol!).

What I would add here is that there is much insight to be gained into the "nature" of some folks to be "night owls" or otherwise. That might include imbalanced hormones as result of inheritance. Just search using the terms, "cortisol circadian rhythm", "cortisol rhythm", and others as interest dictates from there.

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