Turns Out I Cant Go Out Of State Either

Topic 27514 | Page 1

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Moe's Comment
member avatar

Spent some time today calling CRE , Schneider , SWIFT ironically still hasn't gotten back to me. they all voiced concerns about the Oregon five strikes in a year rule.

I want to say first, I was really impressed by the recruiter at CRE he took the time to listen to me and be helpful when he didnt really have to. I also found that the carrier pricing is about equal across the board for the CDL schooling.

Anyway, after a lengthy conversation with a DMV rep and supervisor I was told emphatically that I will need to wait a year before I can test in or be issued a CDL in the state of Oregon. That means , I am done till Jan 2021 and have to look at other employment until then.

After then, I am going to do it right and go carrier paid CDL training.

Thank you everyone for your support these last few months and hopefully I'll see you on the road someday....sooner than later..... I dunno how much I'll be on the site. I have to look for a new job now and deal with life , it is what it is .

Moe

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Moe's Comment
member avatar

The other option is to kove out of state, frankly I've been wanting out of the PNW for sometime preferably Texas.

If the right opportunity came about I'd be willing to relocate....

Spent some time today calling CRE , Schneider , SWIFT ironically still hasn't gotten back to me. they all voiced concerns about the Oregon five strikes in a year rule.

I want to say first, I was really impressed by the recruiter at CRE he took the time to listen to me and be helpful when he didnt really have to. I also found that the carrier pricing is about equal across the board for the CDL schooling.

Anyway, after a lengthy conversation with a DMV rep and supervisor I was told emphatically that I will need to wait a year before I can test in or be issued a CDL in the state of Oregon. That means , I am done till Jan 2021 and have to look at other employment until then.

After then, I am going to do it right and go carrier paid CDL training.

Thank you everyone for your support these last few months and hopefully I'll see you on the road someday....sooner than later..... I dunno how much I'll be on the site. I have to look for a new job now and deal with life , it is what it is .

Moe

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Rookie Doyenne's Comment
member avatar

Moe, as I read your first post, I was thinking "out of state" and then I saw you posted that in your second. Some opportunities "come along", as you noted.... aren't others sometimes "found"?

"Relocation" can take on different meanings when heading out OTR..... I think of that option some folks take to put stuff in storage for awhile, work out a residential address somewhere for necessary items of business.

I believe I just read that you got some endorsements and were writing with commitment to this goal. That's great momentum. I hope you don't really need to park it for a year.

Best!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Moe's Comment
member avatar

Thank you, right now I am mentally exhausted from all this back and forth up and down stuff. I get told one thing than another , it took me over an hour to get a straight answer from DMV.

I need a mental break , going to bed will start making out the next steps this weekend forward.

Moe, as I read your first post, I was thinking "out of state" and then I saw you posted that in your second. Some opportunities "come along", as you noted.... aren't others sometimes "found"?

"Relocation" can take on different meanings when heading out OTR..... I think of that option some folks take to put stuff in storage for awhile, work out a residential address somewhere for necessary items of business.

I believe I just read that you got some endorsements and were writing with commitment to this goal. That's great momentum. I hope you don't really need to park it for a year.

Best!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Turtle Protege (formerly 's Comment
member avatar

Moe,

Sorry to hear about your latest setback.

Good luck finding a job until your year is up and keep us updated on your progress.

Rob.

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

Spent some time today calling CRE , Schneider , SWIFT ironically still hasn't gotten back to me. they all voiced concerns about the Oregon five strikes in a year rule.

I want to say first, I was really impressed by the recruiter at CRE he took the time to listen to me and be helpful when he didnt really have to. I also found that the carrier pricing is about equal across the board for the CDL schooling.

Anyway, after a lengthy conversation with a DMV rep and supervisor I was told emphatically that I will need to wait a year before I can test in or be issued a CDL in the state of Oregon. That means , I am done till Jan 2021 and have to look at other employment until then.

After then, I am going to do it right and go carrier paid CDL training.

Thank you everyone for your support these last few months and hopefully I'll see you on the road someday....sooner than later..... I dunno how much I'll be on the site. I have to look for a new job now and deal with life , it is what it is .

Moe

Try something along these lines

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

...or

Try to get a local gig driving a straight truck under 26k GVW. This does not require a CDL. At least you will be gaining some experience operating a large vehicle.

Good luck Moe.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

...or

Try to get a local gig driving a straight truck under 26k GVW. This does not require a CDL. At least you will be gaining some experience operating a large vehicle.

Good luck Moe.

I drive a straight truck a couple times a week. There is no comparison. Plus the backing is "backwards" compared to a combination.

I'd rather drive a tractor with a pup. More maneuverable.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Pacific Pearl's Comment
member avatar

Too bad Oregon is making you wait a year. Washington DOESN'T CARE! Good thing you live on the state line. All you need to do is, "move" across town (all of Portland's suburbs to the North are in Washington State). Now, "moving" can mean many things. It's not necessary to buy real estate, plant crops or re-bury your ancestors there - use a friend's address, rent a room for a month or just do whatever you have to. Once your WA license is in your hand call Swift/Schneider/Prime and get the party started. Of course, Washington doesn't have an income tax either.

I saw on another thread where you were worried about making the numbers work. I got two things out of reading that thread. One, you're afraid of the changes you'll face ahead. Two, you're unsure of your future cash flows. It's only human to get comfortable where you are, even if it's miserable, and put off making changes. I can't help you there other than to point out it's a fairly common issue. I can show you a few things about the cash flow part. Conservatively, if you're making 30 cpm and averaging 2,500 miles a week you'll be grossing $750/wk before tax. Most companies pay by the week. After Federal and withholdings you should be looking at ~$500/wk. At $100/wk you should pay off your school loan in about 9 months. Swift's deal requires you to pay about $100/wk your first year. Stick around another year and they pay you the $100/wk back so it's more like they're holding your money for you then giving it back. You'll be paying off your loans and still have around $1200/month for your other bills. Except, you won't. You'll learn to manage your time better and be pulling closer to the 3,800 miles a week an experienced driver can do. You'll also be getting raises on your cpm rate and bonuses for safety, mileage and other bumps.

Yes, $11,000 is a lot of money. If you were spending it on hookers and blow I'd worry but you're creating an asset. Your CDL and some driving experience with a clean record (tickets/accidents) is a proven money maker. With years of experience I clear >$1,500/wk and get weekends off. You won't make that your first year. I didn't either but I wouldn't have the job I have today if I didn't get off the couch and learn the skills I use now. I won't ask where you can get a house in Portland for $11,000 cash down.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Auggie wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

...or

Try to get a local gig driving a straight truck under 26k GVW. This does not require a CDL. At least you will be gaining some experience operating a large vehicle.

Good luck Moe.

double-quotes-end.png

I drive a straight truck a couple times a week. There is no comparison. Plus the backing is "backwards" compared to a combination.

I'd rather drive a tractor with a pup. More maneuverable.

I am aware of that Auggie.

However Moe does not have his CDL. His options are limited, let’s offer him solutions that are realistic.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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