Roehl CDL Program Reviews

Topic 27690 | Page 1

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Timothy's Comment
member avatar

Hello all, Im wanting to get some of your thoughts on Roehl's CDL program. Also avg. Weekly pay. They offered me Dry Van national at .36 per mile. The recruiter said i would do about 2300 miles a week. Per my calculations this is far from the 60k a year they advertised. Thanks

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Roehl has multiple divisions and each pays differently, dry van pays the least. it also depends on hometime which they have various options.

when recruiter throw out numbers they speak in "average" and "up to". So average $60k per year means some make $40k some make $80k.. and "up to $70k" would mean experienced drivers who know how to manage their clocks.

2300 miles per week sounds low but maybe thst is rralistic for them right now. That means they are honest instead of lying you would be getting 3400 miles every week.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
midnight fox's Comment
member avatar

My Roehl Training Adventure

Roehl GYCDL Program First Year Numbers (pay And Mileage)

Starting On My Path To A Career In Trucking!

Preparing For A Trucking Career With Roehl

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I think the fine print on their website advertising the GYCDL program states 50% of Roehl drivers make over 60k. So the reference is based on a sampling of all their drivers, including experienced (and not an exclusive claim that 50% of student drivers will make that during their first year). This is actually an important take-away as you begin this career; carefully read everything (for instance) on a road sign, in a test question, and on load instructions. Don't get caught-up in the "headline" so-to-speak, absorb all of the information.

Try to keep something in mind here, as you learn this job, your performance should increase, thus your mileage will increase as you prove that you can handle the additional workload. You will also likely receive CPM increases along the way. In essence, your first year is all about learning how to safely/efficiently operate your truck, develop good trip planning skills and exercising good clock management skills.

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

To correct my statement.. dry van pays the least cpm wise. Miles may be more, and put you at a more comparable weekly gross. However, the driver's ability to manage his time is what really counts.

However, reefer isnt as bad as people make it sound. I am usually 50% drop and hook. For some reason people assume dry van means 100% drop and hook at both ends, but that isnt true

Dry van's appointments are more flexible than reefer. However, i run a lot of dry loads and still get my reefer cpm. My last 2 loads were dry.

i have been teaming this week. 5 loads, 5870 miles, only 2 live unloads, the rest were drop an hooks.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Brandon Kitts's Comment
member avatar

The CDL program at Roehl is really good. The national dry van guys average 2600 to 3000 miles a week. The cpm is your base pay. We use a scorecard system where you earn point based on performance and there are different tiers of added pay.

During training you will make 500 a week before taxes. During phase 2 you make 90 dollars a day as long as you and your trainer spend at least 6 hours on duty together. My OTR trainer ran recaps so I got paid 7 days a week. Some run hard all week and then do a 34 on Saturday and Sunday.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Brandon Kitts's Comment
member avatar

There are several good company-paid CDL training programs though. Primes is different in method but a good company.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Wild-Bill's Comment
member avatar

The GYCDL training is excellent. Midnight Fox linked some recent training diary entries that will help understand the program. As to pay and mileage, it can vary a lot based on your home time choices. 2300 seems low for van. But, Regional will get less miles than national. The point system Brandon mentioned will help you get to top tier pay within a few quarters as long as you’re on time, don’t hit anything etc. I’ve run into several veterans making $70-$80k. Don’t expect that your first year though. Someone recently posted their take home pay in the low To mid $40’s the first year. I’m not sure what deductions she had but a low 40k take home would equate to a low 50’s gross and that would seem realistic in the first year. After that you can be well above that 60 mark if you work at it.

So far I’m loving the company everyone in the office seems to want to help the drivers be successful. I sent in a suggestion the other day and got a call back on it the next morning. That impressed me. It’ll be what you make if it though. I’ve run into a few terminal rats that had some very unflattering things to say about some of the same people I’ve found to be the most helpful. You just can’t make everyone happy I guess.

Best of luck. Let us know if you have other questions there are a bunch of new Roehl folks here.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Aubrey M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello all, Im wanting to get some of your thoughts on Roehl's CDL program. Also avg. Weekly pay. They offered me Dry Van national at .36 per mile. The recruiter said i would do about 2300 miles a week. Per my calculations this is far from the 60k a year they advertised. Thanks

There are no GYCDL drivers at Roehl making 60k their first year, and I don't think you're going to find any company where a trainee makes that. Roehl has a good training program, good customer base, good equipment, good insurance, and is showing growth in an industry where companies are regularly going bankrupt or closing now. To me, these factors and the training and experience I've gained balance out the low first year pay.

My w2 was just over 32k for last year at a pay rate of 38.5cpm until november when I went to 41cpm. I started dec 31 of 2018 and went solo on february 20, 2019. I put in over 100k miles and finished my 120k contract the last week of january this year. I'm currently a bit over 130k miles. All of my pay and mileage is posted in the above link if you want to look closer.

You have to get experience and pay your dues somewhere, and Roehl is a good place to do that. I was just raised to 43.5cpm on my last paycheck and I am due for a supposedly more significant raise at the end of April.

A note though, apparently recruiters are still telling new hires that they will get a penny raise after 3 months and 2 cents after 6 months, this is not true and the DRG has been changed as of last April or May to reflect this.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Andrew J.'s Comment
member avatar

Your first 6 months will be the 36 cpm as advertised. These months are spent learning the job and how to be safe and efficient at it. Then after the six months based on your performance you can go onto the Roehl “premium mileage plan” which is based on your performance. They score things like mpg, miles turned, on time deliveries, preventable incidents. You also get points on it for having a passport, hazmat , and Twic. Your cpm can go up toward 50 cpm with van if you perform very well but don’t count on that high. Somewhere in the 40 cpm is more likely. So yes you can make 60k a year if you do well. It is a good program I am a reefer driver there and got 3500 miles last week although I’m a driver trainer and get more miles because of that. I highly recommend going there if you wanna get into this industry.

Hello all, Im wanting to get some of your thoughts on Roehl's CDL program. Also avg. Weekly pay. They offered me Dry Van national at .36 per mile. The recruiter said i would do about 2300 miles a week. Per my calculations this is far from the 60k a year they advertised. Thanks

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

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