First Week Experience

Topic 27962 | Page 2

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Dean, check out our long running Flatbed Variety topic. This could be you sometime.

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

Did your company not have any securement training before you went out with the trainer?

Dean R.'s Comment
member avatar

Did your company not have any securement training before you went out with the trainer?

Nope. All OJT.

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

I dunno man, for flatbed that sounds kinda fly by night. Though I know it was hard to get an orientation during the virus. As long as your trainer is teaching, and you are doing things safely just try to swallow the pride and stick with it. Channel your inner jarhead an push through. Ask old school about his trainer. Brutal.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Dean thank you for your service. I too am former Navy and have great respect for marines. You have been through much worse in the service. Trainers come in all forms. Learn what you can from him and remember this is a temporary situation in the scheme of your career. Living in a truck with someone is very hard for everyone. My girlfriend works for me and we work together and there are times we get on each others nerves. Like you she is learning. Can she do things as quick and efficient as I can? No. But she is learning.

I think your company did a poor job getting you out there without classroom on securement. But, learn it, take pictures with your phone if needed for future reference. Youtube can also be useful sometimes. Just don’t do that around the trainer.

Old School and turtle can give you much better info specific to flatbedding.

Learn, listen, and get through it and move on.

Chris L's Comment
member avatar

Dean don't give up just yet. If you haven't yet approach your tainer and talk with him and clear the air so to speak. Find out what his expectations are for you and what's the plan for you to meet those expectations. You said in your post that basically your Training is all OJT so your company is expecting that you get the required training before you go solo. Since you have zero experience in load securement your trainer should be taking you through it step by step that's what the company is expecting from him. In the service your Drill Instructors didn't issue you a rifle Monday morning and have you sending rounds down range that afternoon. You learned the basic marksmanship fundemantals, disassembly, assembly of the rifle before one round was loaded and fired. So basically crawl, walk, run the same philosophy should apply to load securement. My back ground is training I've trained U.S. ,Iraqi, and Afghan soldiers and each took a unique approach to train some could master and task very quickly some took a bit longer but in the end I could confidently say that all met the required standard. There are good trainers and bad trainers out there no doubt about it. Remember back to Boot Camp you had good Drill Instructors and bad Drill Instructors the good ones would Teach, Coach, and Mentor the bad ones would not. I'm sure that you are not expecting your current trainer hold you by the hand and treat you like a 6 year old but be a professional and teach you the tools of the trade so you can become a successful flat bed driver. Yelling and screaming is nothing but counter productive! Again my perspective is from the training angle I'm not familiar with the particulars of flat bed side of the house. I'm sure some of the regulars on this forum with flat bed experience will chime in. Talking with your current trainer about your concerns will help you through your training time. Good luck and stick with it.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Dean one of the most important parts of becoming a top tier performer is communication.

I’m not going to sugar coat any of this...

Before going too much further you need to calmly and clearly communicate with your trainer so he understands what you need help with, why and find out from him the best way to address those needs. Second; realize part of his anger might be the lack of training you received on load securement. Ask him why he is irritated. Confront him in a professional manner. Don’t let this fester...

That said... he sounds like a hot head, however you will be dealing with all kinds of personalities out here, many of them unabashed jackasses, many (unfortunately) with the power to make your life miserable. It’s up to you to make adjustments that enable your overall success and sanity.

Whatever you do, please keep your cool.

Good luck!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

...and one additional suggestion.

Your Mack has a detailed operators manual. I encourage you to review it, focusing on safety appliances like the engine brake...etc. It’s part of your job as a professional to know your equipment.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I had ZERO classroom securement training prior to going out with my trainers, and I'm glad for it. It would honestly be mostly a waste of time, in my opinion. The tips, tricks, tools and nuances of every different kind of load can really only be learned on the job, under the supervision of an experienced trainer. On a day-by-day basis, I would learn what to do under different circumstances.

Some things just can't be taught in a class.

However, once the OTR training was completed, and before upgrading to solo, I was required to attend a day securement class, which basically just reviewed and reinforced everything I learned on the road.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dean R.'s Comment
member avatar

Dean don't give up just yet. If you haven't yet approach your tainer and talk with him and clear the air so to speak. Find out what his expectations are for you and what's the plan for you to meet those expectations. You said in your post that basically your Training is all OJT so your company is expecting that you get the required training before you go solo. Since you have zero experience in load securement your trainer should be taking you through it step by step that's what the company is expecting from him. In the service your Drill Instructors didn't issue you a rifle Monday morning and have you sending rounds down range that afternoon. You learned the basic marksmanship fundemantals, disassembly, assembly of the rifle before one round was loaded and fired. So basically crawl, walk, run the same philosophy should apply to load securement. My back ground is training I've trained U.S. ,Iraqi, and Afghan soldiers and each took a unique approach to train some could master and task very quickly some took a bit longer but in the end I could confidently say that all met the required standard. There are good trainers and bad trainers out there no doubt about it. Remember back to Boot Camp you had good Drill Instructors and bad Drill Instructors the good ones would Teach, Coach, and Mentor the bad ones would not. I'm sure that you are not expecting your current trainer hold you by the hand and treat you like a 6 year old but be a professional and teach you the tools of the trade so you can become a successful flat bed driver. Yelling and screaming is nothing but counter productive! Again my perspective is from the training angle I'm not familiar with the particulars of flat bed side of the house. I'm sure some of the regulars on this forum with flat bed experience will chime in. Talking with your current trainer about your concerns will help you through your training time. Good luck and stick with it.

Thanks for the encouragement Chris L. I'm going to learn what I can from someone who can't teach. Then get the you-know-what off of his truck.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Advice For New Truck Drivers Becoming A Truck Driver CDL Training Flatbed Load Securement Photos
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More