Truck Stop Follies And Assorted Stupidity

Topic 28082 | Page 11

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Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

White Volvo Mafia at work again.

This happened in KC, MO earlier. I guess we can't read signs, were feeling lucky, or not paying attention. This bridge averages two trucks per month and has it's own FB account. This is a railroad overpass.

0957483001661544072.jpg

0359612001661544134.jpg

It's possible that the driver is able to read, was fully paying attention, saw the sign, and made the choice to proceed. "How," you ask? The driver doesn't know the height of the truck. All the signs, reading capability, and paying attention in the world wouldn't help not knowing the dimensions of the truck.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Maybe it was an exploding overhead meteor that distracted the driver?

Maybe it was the nude ghost of Jayne Mansfield strolling across the street that prevented him seeing the "12 Foot" sign?

Maybe he was in a big hurry to cash in his winning Mega Millions jackpot ticket?

No Ryan, that guy was a dumbazz! Period.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
BK's Comment
member avatar

Maybe it was an exploding overhead meteor that distracted the driver?

Maybe it was the nude ghost of Jayne Mansfield strolling across the street that prevented him seeing the "12 Foot" sign?

Maybe he was in a big hurry to cash in his winning Mega Millions jackpot ticket?

No Ryan, that guy was a dumbazz! Period.

PackRat, give the driver a break. Maybe he’s dyslexic and he thought the clearance was 21 feet.

I contribute to a non-profit organization called DAM (Mothers Against Dyslexia), so I have empathy for dyslexic drivers.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

That would point back at my "It's too easy to get a CDL" stance. Your CMV height is a Week 1 Training Lesson. Many companies have stickers on the trailer and/or dash that read "13' 6" Height".

Any driver that doesn't know their height, weights, dimensions, engine, make, model, year, engine size, tire sizes, oil weight, tire pressures, and antifreeze type (AT A MINIMUM) is behind the eight ball.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
BK's Comment
member avatar

That would point back at my "It's too easy to get a CDL" stance. Your CMV height is a Week 1 Training Lesson. Many companies have stickers on the trailer and/or dash that read "13' 6" Height".

Any driver that doesn't know their height, weights, dimensions, engine, make, model, year, engine size, tire sizes, oil weight, tire pressures, and antifreeze type (AT A MINIMUM) is behind the eight ball.

I forgot to put “LOL” after my previous comment. Had a senior moment.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Maybe it was an exploding overhead meteor that distracted the driver?

Maybe it was the nude ghost of Jayne Mansfield strolling across the street that prevented him seeing the "12 Foot" sign?

Maybe he was in a big hurry to cash in his winning Mega Millions jackpot ticket?

No Ryan, that guy was a dumbazz! Period.

Wouldn't not knowing one's own truck dimensions qualify as being a dumbazz? Certainly wouldn't be up for genius awards.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

That would point back at my "It's too easy to get a CDL" stance. Your CMV height is a Week 1 Training Lesson. Many companies have stickers on the trailer and/or dash that read "13' 6" Height".

Any driver that doesn't know their height, weights, dimensions, engine, make, model, year, engine size, tire sizes, oil weight, tire pressures, and antifreeze type (AT A MINIMUM) is behind the eight ball.

"Many" is not all. The height of the vehicle is one question on the test. Several missed questions still passes.

I don't know my engine size. Not a mechanic. What purpose does it serve me to know the cu. in. or L of the engine? The shop works on the truck and I imagine that there is a lot about driving that the mechanics don't know. Are they behind the 8-ball? Each role has their part. I know enough about the truck to relay information as needed when there is a problem. I know enough about the truck to determine when it is and isn't safe to drive. Unless there is a possibility for engine expansion and shrinkage, I don't see how engine size is essential knowledge to a driver. I don't carry a tape measure any way.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I actually posted that so you would bring up another contradictory view. I could point out why, but that would be my time wasted, Ryan. The minimum is good enough for some. Your responses illustrate that you haven't even glanced through an owners manual for a truck, so you do know it all through your experience, or just know what you think you should have knowledge on? Must be a lot after what is it, a year? Choose to stay ignorant about things related to this industry. Matters not to me.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

That would point back at my "It's too easy to get a CDL" stance. Your CMV height is a Week 1 Training Lesson. Many companies have stickers on the trailer and/or dash that read "13' 6" Height".

Any driver that doesn't know their height, weights, dimensions, engine, make, model, year, engine size, tire sizes, oil weight, tire pressures, and antifreeze type (AT A MINIMUM) is behind the eight ball.

double-quotes-end.png

I forgot to put “LOL” after my previous comment. Had a senior moment.

PackRat, indeed, however. Even back in 2003... signs and safety was the MOST paramount; especially with ZERO GPS's... at least for us 'commoners!'

Here's ME, doing it 'FER' ya ~! See below, BK. It's just adding things to the HTML code, in or out of brackets. I'm not a mod, they can do more; this is HTML 101 ...really.

I forgot to put “LOL” after my previous comment. Had a senior moment. FIXED! rofl-1.gif rofl-1.gif

Peace, y'all !

~ Anne ~

ps; re: the specs & such with one's truck, FWIW I bet I know Tom's better than HE does! Then again, the 'easy' stuff... like bridge heights is just....THE COMMON SENSE stuff. I was born with the 13'6" tattoo on my ankle; now I know why!~ These guys just LEFT the truck stop, and obviously the bridge wasn't the issue... just the law of physics, as to how many objects can own the same time & space, at once. That poor officer!

sorry.gif

0266170001661666772.jpg

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

I actually posted that so you would bring up another contradictory view. I could point out why, but that would be my time wasted, Ryan. The minimum is good enough for some. Your responses illustrate that you haven't even glanced through an owners manual for a truck, so you do know it all through your experience, or just know what you think you should have knowledge on? Must be a lot after what is it, a year? Choose to stay ignorant about things related to this industry. Matters not to me.

Whether I have or haven't read a manual, believe what you like. I simply pointed out that something you regarded as an obvious conclusion might not be as obvious as it first seems. Get your shine on. It doesn't change the fact that road signs are only as good as the knowledge a person has about the vehicle being driven.

If you believe that a person would be capable of passing the drive portion of CDL test and still manage to not pay attention to road signs, then why not believe that there are also people who pass the written tests without retaining the knowledge?

If there is ever a road sign that requires me knowing the size of the truck's engine to obey it, guess I am screwed.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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