Truck Stop Follies And Assorted Stupidity

Topic 28082 | Page 12

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Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

I live in a small community in western Pennsylvania. Amish population excluded, we're about 1200 residents. Our rush hours and traffic jams are usually because of horses and buggies on the road and not being able to pass because everything is two lanes and the turns are tight, very tight. We have two routes through town that combined tractor trailers are permitted to navigate. Everything else is a 10T weight limit. The signage is pretty good but could be better in some places as the 10T signs on some roads are around the corner or a big tree that you can't see until you're on the road. However, when a tractor comes into town on the main drags, it's pretty clear where you can go. So, when this happens, and the driver says, "my GPS said I could turn here," eh, hard to follow that. I feel bad for the driver. But the signage is pretty cleat where they were.

Admittedly, my GPS has almost gotten me into some tight spots. The other was a 10T road in a residential area in Litiz, PA, after I encountered a road closed sign with no warning until I arrived right at the closure. The detour sign pointed straight to a 10T road. confused.gif but I navigated differently.

Anyway, here's the end result of the driver mentioned above.

0601067001661691410.jpg

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

I live in a small community in western Pennsylvania. Amish population excluded, we're about 1200 residents. Our rush hours and traffic jams are usually because of horses and buggies on the road and not being able to pass because everything is two lanes and the turns are tight, very tight. We have two routes through town that combined tractor trailers are permitted to navigate. Everything else is a 10T weight limit. The signage is pretty good but could be better in some places as the 10T signs on some roads are around the corner or a big tree that you can't see until you're on the road. However, when a tractor comes into town on the main drags, it's pretty clear where you can go. So, when this happens, and the driver says, "my GPS said I could turn here," eh, hard to follow that. I feel bad for the driver. But the signage is pretty cleat where they were.

Admittedly, my GPS has almost gotten me into some tight spots. The other was a 10T road in a residential area in Litiz, PA, after I encountered a road closed sign with no warning until I arrived right at the closure. The detour sign pointed straight to a 10T road. confused.gif but I navigated differently.

Anyway, here's the end result of the driver mentioned above.

0601067001661691410.jpg

I recently delivered in Elizabethville, PA and it was exactly like what you are describing. US-209 runs through the town and there is one other road that is suitable for trucks running the other direction. In the midst of little tiny streets and residential areas is a small warehouse with a truck lot beside it. There is no way to get to this warehouse without leaving US-209 or PA-225 (the other truck friendly road). Callowhill St. is just a tad wider than some of the other residential streets and allows a tractor trailer to make that turn. That area is definitely not for an experienced driver. That turn onto Callowhill St. from US-209 is easy to miss. It really doesn't look like a turn a truck should be making.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

Yep. Sounds sketchy! I pick up in the town of Hanover, PA on a bi-weekly basis it seems; there are only two main roads in and out on your way to what I call warehouse way which leads to about 4 or 5 industrial sites. But, if you pass the last site, you are in trouble. In fact, the GPS is screaming at me to 'find a truck route' when I make the turn. Lol. Makes me want to drive straight truck! 😁

double-quotes-start.png

I live in a small community in western Pennsylvania. Amish population excluded, we're about 1200 residents. Our rush hours and traffic jams are usually because of horses and buggies on the road and not being able to pass because everything is two lanes and the turns are tight, very tight. We have two routes through town that combined tractor trailers are permitted to navigate. Everything else is a 10T weight limit. The signage is pretty good but could be better in some places as the 10T signs on some roads are around the corner or a big tree that you can't see until you're on the road. However, when a tractor comes into town on the main drags, it's pretty clear where you can go. So, when this happens, and the driver says, "my GPS said I could turn here," eh, hard to follow that. I feel bad for the driver. But the signage is pretty cleat where they were.

Admittedly, my GPS has almost gotten me into some tight spots. The other was a 10T road in a residential area in Litiz, PA, after I encountered a road closed sign with no warning until I arrived right at the closure. The detour sign pointed straight to a 10T road. confused.gif but I navigated differently.

Anyway, here's the end result of the driver mentioned above.

0601067001661691410.jpg

double-quotes-end.png

I recently delivered in Elizabethville, PA and it was exactly like what you are describing. US-209 runs through the town and there is one other road that is suitable for trucks running the other direction. In the midst of little tiny streets and residential areas is a small warehouse with a truck lot beside it. There is no way to get to this warehouse without leaving US-209 or PA-225 (the other truck friendly road). Callowhill St. is just a tad wider than some of the other residential streets and allows a tractor trailer to make that turn. That area is definitely not for an experienced driver. That turn onto Callowhill St. from US-209 is easy to miss. It really doesn't look like a turn a truck should be making.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
midnight fox's Comment
member avatar

Ryan B. said:

It's possible that the driver is able to read, was fully paying attention, saw the sign, and made the choice to proceed. "How," you ask? The driver doesn't know the height of the truck.

The responsible driver in your scenario would stop and ask themselves what would happen if the vehicle they didn't know the height of turned out to be too tall. You're trying to make an excuse where none exists.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar
Lol. Makes me want to drive straight truck! 😁

rofl-3.gifThere's a thread for that, hahahah! rofl-3.gif

~ Anne ~

ps: There's probably an APP for that, too!

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

Haha. . Haha. Mrs Anne, you're the best. But it would be easier. I just wouldn't be able to call myself a 'Big Time Twuk Dwivvah!" rofl-1.gif

double-quotes-start.png

Lol. Makes me want to drive straight truck! 😁

double-quotes-end.png

rofl-3.gifThere's a thread for that, hahahah! rofl-3.gif

~ Anne ~

ps: There's probably an APP for that, too!

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I live in a small community in western Pennsylvania. Amish population excluded, we're about 1200 residents. Our rush hours and traffic jams are usually because of horses and buggies on the road and not being able to pass because everything is two lanes and the turns are tight, very tight. We have two routes through town that combined tractor trailers are permitted to navigate. Everything else is a 10T weight limit. The signage is pretty good but could be better in some places as the 10T signs on some roads are around the corner or a big tree that you can't see until you're on the road. However, when a tractor comes into town on the main drags, it's pretty clear where you can go. So, when this happens, and the driver says, "my GPS said I could turn here," eh, hard to follow that. I feel bad for the driver. But the signage is pretty cleat where they were.

Admittedly, my GPS has almost gotten me into some tight spots. The other was a 10T road in a residential area in Litiz, PA, after I encountered a road closed sign with no warning until I arrived right at the closure. The detour sign pointed straight to a 10T road. confused.gif but I navigated differently.

Anyway, here's the end result of the driver mentioned above.

0601067001661691410.jpg

double-quotes-end.png

I recently delivered in Elizabethville, PA and it was exactly like what you are describing. US-209 runs through the town and there is one other road that is suitable for trucks running the other direction. In the midst of little tiny streets and residential areas is a small warehouse with a truck lot beside it. There is no way to get to this warehouse without leaving US-209 or PA-225 (the other truck friendly road). Callowhill St. is just a tad wider than some of the other residential streets and allows a tractor trailer to make that turn. That area is definitely not for an experienced driver. That turn onto Callowhill St. from US-209 is easy to miss. It really doesn't look like a turn a truck should be making.

Correction:

Not for an inexperienced driver.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

0319930001661801917.jpg

How not to Weigh Your Truck.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

0598931001661962902.jpg

wtf.gif

Found this gem online. How not to exit the fuel island. Enter your lane as straight as possible. Clear all obstacles before beginning a turn while utilizing those mirrors.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Dang, PackRat ~ You're on a ROLL ! Bonehead Truckers x 10 ... courtesy of... YOU! TT's # 1 ~!!!

dancing-dog.gif ~ Anne ~ dancing-dog.gif

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