Best (?) LTL Carrier For Linehaul

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Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Yes its true, it doesn't impact my feelings at all. I haven't been on the clock in over a year so it doesn't affect me much. Plus if I was on the clock I'd be getting $30.50 a hour which to me is fair.

Overall our hourly drivers seem pretty happy with the compensation they get a lot of them are making over 80k a year.

Roger P.'s Comment
member avatar

"Nobody bothers me" is a big deal for me and basically why linehaul is attractive.

How many miles do you get per week? What was it like starting there? Did you already have a CDL?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

My bid run is at least 2000 miles per week could be up 3000 if we have the freight. Since I've started I probably average 2k+ miles a week.

Yes, I had my CDL spent 2 months with another company and then got hired by OD. Went out for 4 weeks of training getting paid my normal hourly rate then I was on my own.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar
Coming from a union family I think there are two kinds of workplaces: The kind where you have absolutely zero rights, just the goodwill of your employer, and a union shop. I'm not worried about the union having my back because I can't pass a drug test or I keep crashing into stuff. Forgive me if I want something to protect my job beyond the goodwill of my employer.

Look, I really don't care what you think (in reference to the "Nuts" comments), and I clearly stated that in my reply.

Your above assessment of the trucking industry (two different workplaces) has not been my experience, nor do I ever expect it to be. I'll go out on a limb and suggest that is consistent with most every experienced driver on this forum. Like I have said for the third time, trucking is different and what you know about other businesses (union and non-union) and how workers (drivers in our case) are treated, doesn't apply.

Your performance protects your job...PERIOD. Your performance solidifies how you are treated by your company. That Sir is the point(s) several of us have repeatedly made, that doesn't seem to resonate with you. If you are okay with being a top performer kicking-ass in a union shop and not being treated any better than under performing drivers, ...go for it. Not for me.

I'm done with this.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Roger, our focus here is helping people make a good start in their trucking careers. We make every effort to help everyone that shows up here. Unfortunately we can't help all of them. Some of them think they already know more than we do. Others think we're some sort of pimps for "Big Trucking." We get all kinds. But we've found that most people wanting to get into trucking simply do not understand the dynamics that make the job so wonderful for one person while making it so miserable for another. You revealed your ignorance on that substantive knowledge when you said this...

Forgive me if I want something to protect my job beyond the goodwill of my employer.

Success at Trucking is more easily grasped by those who've been self employed. Congratulations - you've got a leg up! But only if you do away with that Union mentality you've got. I'll tell you what the "goodwill of your employer" will do for you in trucking. They will let you rise or fall on your own merit. That's actually what they look for. These businesses run best with self motivated people who like to be creative about getting things accomplished.

I've always excelled at this career. I credit much of that to running my own business prior to this as my second career. I earn twice what many of my peers working the same account make. It's simply because I am consistently capable of accomplishing much more than them. Productivity, efficiency, and maintaining a positive working relationship with your team in dispatch works wonders out here.

Everybody in trucking is measured by their results. Your performance actually determines your treatment and your level of income. Nobody holds your hand in this job and nobody has your back. You are your own advocate, or your own demise. That's how it works. It's a simple formula. If you think you need an advocate then go for a union job, but even there you will find that performance trumps seniority. That's how trucking works.

Successful Drivers Operate Like Business Owners

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Navypoppop's Comment
member avatar

G-Town and Old School,

All your good advice has fallen on deaf ears and a one sided opinionated op. Don't let yourselves get caught up in his lop sided views. After all you can't fix stupid. Unions had their purpose many years ago but times are different now. If he chooses them maybe he'll be happy or not. His choice.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Roger P.'s Comment
member avatar

Roger, our focus here is helping people make a good start in their trucking careers. We make every effort to help everyone that shows up here. Unfortunately we can't help all of them. Some of them think they already know more than we do. Others think we're some sort of pimps for "Big Trucking." We get all kinds. But we've found that most people wanting to get into trucking simply do not understand the dynamics that make the job so wonderful for one person while making it so miserable for another. You revealed your ignorance on that substantive knowledge when you said this...

double-quotes-start.png

Forgive me if I want something to protect my job beyond the goodwill of my employer.

double-quotes-end.png

Success at Trucking is more easily grasped by those who've been self employed. Congratulations - you've got a leg up! But only if you do away with that Union mentality you've got. I'll tell you what the "goodwill of your employer" will do for you in trucking. They will let you rise or fall on your own merit. That's actually what they look for. These businesses run best with self motivated people who like to be creative about getting things accomplished.

I just want to be clear that I do NOT think I know more than you or anyone else on this forum about trucking. I will fully admit that all the jobs I had before I went freelance / started my own business were low-paying, low-skilled and not worth what they paid. I am not used to being valued by my employer and generally of the opinion that anyone of my bosses would have sold me for my organs if he thought I might fetch a decent return.

And, as I said above, I come from a union family. My experience with unions is overwhelmingly positive. I believe they provide an additional layer of protection, as well as a means to deal with workplace issues without having to go crying to HR.

I've always excelled at this career. I credit much of that to running my own business prior to this as my second career. I earn twice what many of my peers working the same account make. It's simply because I am consistently capable of accomplishing much more than them. Productivity, efficiency, and maintaining a positive working relationship with your team in dispatch works wonders out here.

Everybody in trucking is measured by their results. Your performance actually determines your treatment and your level of income. Nobody holds your hand in this job and nobody has your back. You are your own advocate, or your own demise. That's how it works. It's a simple formula. If you think you need an advocate then go for a union job, but even there you will find that performance trumps seniority. That's how trucking works.

Successful Drivers Operate Like Business Owners

Totally unrelated to the rest of this, I just want to know what it is you do that causes you to out earn your coworkers so dramatically. As an aside, one of the more attractive things about this to me is that, as a guy who has effectively been "free range" for the last ten years, I chaffe at the notion of being micromanaged. So yeah, I think I will do well because my life for the last ten years has been getting things done for my clients with minimal to nonexistent hand holding.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Banks's Comment
member avatar

There are only 3 Union LTL carriers. ABF, YRC and UPS Freight.

YRC could close their doors tomorrow and I wouldn't be surprised. They're actually delinquent on the employees healthcare fund and they've made no good faith efforts to pay what they owe. Employees have about 8 weeks of health insurance left.

ABF seems to be more solid, but they're Union collects dues and goes home. At ABF they can work you on the dock for 8 hours and then send you out on the road. They do it all the time. They have an excessive overtime provision in their contact, but it gets ignored most of the time.

UPS Freight hates their Union. At this time when the union is supposed to be backing them, people are getting laid off and losing their benefits with no guarantees of coming back, while UPS is using other carriers to move their freight. And it would be very difficult to support a family on the entry level pay rate and lack of hours from being at the bottom.

What's the difference between going to HR and going to a shop steward if you have issues? Personally, I've had plenty of issues resolved by HR quick and painlessly. Not just at FedEx, but previous employers as well.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

No idea what I said that was funny, but I'd love to be clued in.

Roger, you came on here asking for advice with a preconceived idea of what you wanted to hear. You didn't like what you were hearing and your comments tried to slam those of us that don't drive for unions.

When I drove from 88 to 93, there were a good many union companies. I got off the road because the husband wanted to be a cowboy (work cattle ranches). In 2014 I got my CDL and guess what....those union companies are nowhere to be seen. They've folded. So how "safe" is that? Do nonunion companies close their doors? All the time....had DOT shut one down, and the owners knew they were being closed. Got stranded in Fargo ND, but put my info out on a website and had all kinds of calls. A good driver is an asset to any company, are treated well, and don't have to worry about being in an "at will" State....like my State of Idaho.

Having seen the problems with unions (brother-in-law worked for Caterpillar) and what they do to their workers, I wouldn't work a union job for anything....and I'm wanting as much $$$$ to pay off bills so I can retire before long.

Laura

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Roger P.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

No idea what I said that was funny, but I'd love to be clued in.

double-quotes-end.png

Roger, you came on here asking for advice with a preconceived idea of what you wanted to hear. You didn't like what you were hearing and your comments tried to slam those of us that don't drive for unions.

I never asked anyone about the relative merits of unions, but people felt the need to chip in with their two cents. I had specific questions about procedures I didn't "slam" anyone. Forgive me for assuming that truck drivers had slightly thicker skin. Above someone talked about why they like OD which isn't union, I thanked him for his perspective and asked more questions.

Tbh, it seems like the non-union guys are the ones grinding an axe here, not me. Me: "I think I'd like to work in a union shop." Non union drivers: "OH MY GAWD NO DONT LIMIT YOURSELF UNION COMPANIES ARE BAD!" Me: "Eh, I dunno about that." Non union drivers: "WHY ARE YOU PERSECUTING ME?"

Seriously, find me where I ask "Hey guys, are union companies good or bad?" I don't. Not once. I mention that I want to work union and ask what the best companies are. This was apparently the cue for people on the forum to air their grievances about IBT while providing me with zero in the way of constructive advice and then get salty when I suggest that I might personally prefer working in a union shop.

Listen, gang, if you're all happy working non-union, by all means, keep it up. I'm not here to convince anyone to start organizing their workplace. Go check out the back and forth between me and Bobcat Bob.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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