How Is Your Year Going?

Topic 28276 | Page 3

Page 3 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
My wife's always getting on me about taking routes that have me waking up at 9 or 10pm.

I find myself to be much happier when I can sleep till after midnight, I know 9 pm is only a few hours ealier but it makes a huge difference to the way I feel at the end of the day. At least the sun is coming up early so it won't be dark for my entire day which helps.

Banks's Comment
member avatar
Banks unfortunately you're just paying your dues but the time will come that you bid on a run. How many more guys are above you before you could bid a run?

Initially it was looking like about 2 years, but there are a lot of new factors that can make it sooner or later. There's an expectation of some of the furloughed guys not returning. My hub recently began a project to expand the building. These things can make my move to linehaul a lot faster.

The ultimate deciding factor would be freight levels. It depends on what's normal once the dust begins to settle and we determine what the damage is.

I find myself to be much happier when I can sleep till after midnight, I know 9 pm is only a few hours ealier but it makes a huge difference to the way I feel at the end of the day. At least the sun is coming up early so it won't be dark for my entire day which helps

I like my 2 AM start time. Anything earlier leaves me feeling exhausted especially during the summer when it's lighter longer than it's dark.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Gar H.'s Comment
member avatar

We slowed during April But seem to be back up to speed. Local hauling, mostly grass seed in 50lb bags or 2,200 bulk bags. Up to 56,000Lb loads. We usually get 3 loads a day but also get part loads with 4-7 stops out and back before the next trip/load. We have 1 summer driver just started Friday and may have another soon. I started last year April and have gotten 2raises so far. My wife and I are looking into relocating to Texas so I will need to find a new company to work for. I do like the day cab and 6 or 7 am start time M-F with some Saturday morning work. I have thought about tankers and gravel trucks as a change up but also a line haul job. I do enjoy looking out the window and getting paid. At 63, hand loading even with a hand truck or pallet jack holds no interest for me. Thanks to cars who like to pull out in front of us causing a heavy braking check,..I have had to move a lot of grass seed bags back onto pallets. Good exercise but not what I want to do all day. Overall I think our company is doing fine and a lot of the farmers are optimistic about this year coming out okay. Any have an outlook on the hill country in Texas? As I am just 1year into driving truck, I am not sure where is the best place to start looking for work in a different state. We will be getting more serious about moving this fall.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

You line-haul drivers crack me up talking about your "start times."

Here's my "start times" from the last eight days...

2130

1645

1445

0615

0430

0500

0330

0030

My days start all over the place. I'm currently on a JIT load that they didn't even have ready at the proper time. Now it's up to me to figure out how to cover for the shipper's mistake! I flip my days and nights every week, but they pay me well for doing it.

My dispatcher begged me to take this JIT load. He dead-headed me 968 miles just to get me near the shipper. He said, "You're the only driver I've got who understands how to make this happen. When I try to explain to these other guys what they'll need to do, they just say you're crazy - I'm not gonna do that! I need my rest!"

Understanding the HOS rules and how to do things like an 8/2 split can really help you manage things on these multi-stop flatbed loads I do. Being versatile and willing to make sacrifices of what others consider convenient schedules can push you into some serious productivity. That's where the money is in trucking. Being productive, safe, reliable and willing to do what it takes, translates into a solid and rewarding trucking career.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

You line-haul drivers crack me up talking about your "start times."

Here's my "start times" from the last eight days...

2130

1645

1445

0615

0430

0500

0330

0030

My days start all over the place. I'm currently on a JIT load that they didn't even have ready at the proper time. Now it's up to me to figure out how to cover for the shipper's mistake! I flip my days and nights every week, but they pay me well for doing it.

My dispatcher begged me to take this JIT load. He dead-headed me 968 miles just to get me near the shipper. He said, "You're the only driver I've got who understands how to make this happen. When I try to explain to these other guys what they'll need to do, they just say you're crazy - I'm not gonna do that! I need my rest!"

Understanding the HOS rules and how to do things like an 8/2 split can really help you manage things on these multi-stop flatbed loads I do. Being versatile and willing to make sacrifices of what others consider convenient schedules can push you into some serious productivity. That's where the money is in trucking. Being productive, safe, reliable and willing to do what it takes, translates into a solid and rewarding trucking career.

You have some decent start times in there lol.

8/2 split? What's that? You OTR guys have it made. Pull over into any rest stop area and take a nap in a bed. I wonder if FedEx would be willing to put a bed in some of their trucks so I can pullover and take a nap... Nah they need their trailers to be back at the building by the estimated arrival times.

To be fair, I'm willing to take any start time that keeps me in a truck and off the dock. There's nothing wrong with options or preferences smile.gif

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
There's nothing wrong with options or preferences

Very true Banks. And I didn't mean to come off as critical of line-haul drivers. The beauty of trucking is that there are so many types of jobs available to us. I happen to enjoy all the variety and challenges of the OTR lifestyle. Others enjoy, or require, a more structured schedule. Truck drivers are extremely diverse, and there are jobs available for all of us.

I'm glad to see that many of you are doing well. I'm especially glad to see Youyo back at work.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Pete E Pothole's Comment
member avatar

Just short of 34k for me. The 24th will mark my one year solo.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
Here's my "start times" from the last eight days...

I agree with Banks I could work with most of those, it easy for you since your bed is attached.

To be fair, I'm willing to take any start time that keeps me in a truck and off the dock. There's nothing wrong with options or preferences

See i got lucky and don't have to do any dock work, so I have been kind of spoiled.

I wonder if FedEx would be willing to put a bed in some of their trucks so I can pullover and take a nap

I suggested that in our employee survey last year, so far no answer.

Truck drivers are extremely diverse, and there are jobs available for all of us.

Ain't that the truth, my dad is looking at joining us on the road as he is sick of management and the back stabing and headaches that come with it. Problem is he doesn't want to do OTR so it will be interesting to see what he can find.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Wild-Bill's Comment
member avatar

I went solo sometime in February so, This will be my first full quarter solo. What with the low starting CPM and training pay for January, the first half pay doesn’t look great. I should get a nice raise and a little bonus after this quarter is over. I’m learning the job and earning the trust and respect of my FM so, hopefully that will start to pay off in the back half of the year.

Here are my stats so far.

0376047001592082098.jpg

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Banks's Comment
member avatar
Very true Banks. And I didn't mean to come off as critical of line-haul drivers. The beauty of trucking is that there are so many types of jobs available to us. I happen to enjoy all the variety and challenges of the OTR lifestyle. Others enjoy, or require, a more structured schedule. Truck drivers are extremely diverse, and there are jobs available for all of us.

No offense taken Old School, Just friendly back and forth ribbing. We all have positives and negatives, but we all do our best and love what we do.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Page 3 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More