How Is Your Year Going?

Topic 28276 | Page 4

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Rob T.'s Comment
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Gar depending on where you end up moving to maybe you could luck out and get a gig pulling tankers of water or frac sand out in the oil fields. I've heard it pays incredibly well but theres fierce competition and it seems layovers are very frequent depending on the price of oil.

Wow it's hard to believe it's been 1 year already Pete! Are you still enjoying OTR enough to stick with it or are you thinking of looking at other options?

Bobcat I'll post a pic tomorrow of what my company has put in most of our daycabs. It's a wooden box that sits about level with the seats so we can lay across it and take a nap if we want. Definitely not as comfy as the OTR trucks with a sleeper but it's better (and safer) than trying to nap sitting upright in the drivers seat. All our truck fluids and interior cleaning supplies are also stored in there so they're out of the way. *sarcasm incoming* Old school pointed out those start times and they're all over place making me wonder if hes even working out there or pulling off to nap. Us REAL truck drivers use every bit of our 14 (or 17 as I did today...last day of HOS emergency declaration) so we're forced to keep the same time most of the week. Honestly, that is one thing that I'd struggle with the most is the hours being all over the place. It's hard enough once a week flipping my schedule from when I work or have the day off I cant imagine doing it many times each week. What you OTR drivers do day in and day out to get loads delivered safely and working magic with your clock to make the impossible happen amazes me.

Bill those are some nice numbers for sure especially when you consider the issues with appointments being so spread out early on. Hopefully you continue to be the one your dispatcher knows they can rely on to get the job done and see your miles continue use to grow.

Btw Banks and Bobcat. Just remember real truckers pull 53's not those puny little PUP trailers. I've pulled bigger trailers with my minivan rofl-1.gif

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
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I meant LAYOFFS in regards to oil field work, NOT layovers.

Banks's Comment
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Btw Banks and Bobcat. Just remember real truckers pull 53's not those puny little PUP trailers. I've pulled bigger trailers with my minivan 

First of all, we pull 2 of them. You're just jealous that we don't have to back up and they bend in the middle rofl-3.gifsmile.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Yuuyo Y.'s Comment
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I am thankful for my pup in downtown areas and I wouldn't have it any other way.

Rob T.'s Comment
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I am thankful for my pup in downtown areas and I wouldn't have it any other way.

Absolutely I was very thankful for mine down there too. It sucked with how they crammed everything in but maneuvering was much easier. Just giving them a hard time.

Yuuyo Y.'s Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

I am thankful for my pup in downtown areas and I wouldn't have it any other way.

double-quotes-end.png

Absolutely I was very thankful for mine down there too. It sucked with how they crammed everything in but maneuvering was much easier. Just giving them a hard time.

When I was having trouble on Thursday because of 1100 cases in a 42 (With only 50 or so being stop 1) I kept telling myself "I've done 800 in a pup I can handle 1100 in a 42"

I don't want to see 800 in a pup again. When it's so full you can't even put your wheeler in there.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
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Btw Banks and Bobcat. Just remember real truckers pull 53's not those puny little PUP trailers. I've pulled bigger trailers with my minivan

Wow, that's a low blow, I thought us day cabers stuck together.

Give me a little credit I've pulled 53s like 10 times.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Banks's Comment
member avatar
Wow, that's a low blow, I thought us day cabers stuck together.

Obviously not. It's ok Bob, we still have each other.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Wow, that's a low blow, I thought us day cabers stuck together.

double-quotes-end.png

Obviously not. It's ok Bob, we still have each other.

rofl-1.gif I just can't help it. With all the times I've heard guys pulling doubles being referred to as part timers I just had to join the fun ­čśü. Before taking my current job I thought very hard about looking into linehaul but the idea of pulling doubles in the wind and snow/ice terrifies me. The stories our drivers that did doubles at PFG had about that rear trailer wanting to swing out on any ice were enough for me to say heck no!

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Banks's Comment
member avatar
just can't help it. With all the times I've heard guys pulling┬ádoubles┬ábeing referred to as part timers I just had to join the fun ­čśü. Before taking my current job I thought very hard about looking into┬álinehaulbut the idea of pulling doubles in the wind and snow/ice terrifies me. The stories our drivers that did doubles at PFG had about that rear trailer wanting to swing out on any ice were enough for me to say heck no!

I haven't dealt with bad snow yet, but FedEx has no problem shutting down in inclement weather. If it needs chains, shut it down. The wind is another story. I've dealt with wind that intensifies the crack the whip effect. I change lanes and my rear trailer sways back and forth for longer than I want it to before falling back in line. I've gotten better at controlling it, but it's still scary when it happens.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

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