Safety Procedures Many Get Wrong

Topic 28306 | Page 1

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Mikey B.'s Comment
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Hey all, I am stunned by the amount of safety procedures that are often used incorrectly, sometimes creating a hazardous situation themselves. I can think of a few but I'm going to start with a HUGE one that I see quite often that irritates the heck out of me. I am going to start this with emergency flasher aka 4 ways usage in the rain. It is dangerous to drive through heavy rain with you flashers on!!! I pulled this from the interweb.

"So - regardless of the weather conditions - if you are driving a moving vehicle, do not activate your flashing lights; it will only cause confusion and compromise your safety," Durkin said. Hazard lights can actually reduce visibility making other drivers think you are stopped or stalled."

This is absolutely correct. When driving with reduced visibility turn your lights on only, not flashers. When another driver comes up on you they don't know if you just have the flashers on or if there is an accident or slowdown etc.

DON'T USE EMERGENCY FLASHERS IN THE RAIN WHILE DRIVING UNLESS YOU ARE GOING UNDER 40 UP A HILL IN THE RIGHT LANE.

Joseph I.'s Comment
member avatar

I got to thinking, I have never seen someone using there flashers in the manner you are talking about. I have seen them used when going very slow or coming upon a traffic slowdown or stoppage but never by anyone traveling at highway speed.

Navypoppop's Comment
member avatar

Don't drive down here in Florida when it rains. These crazy people think that every daily downpour requires 4 way flashers. Confusing and dangerous at the very least but also illegal but not enforced by the police. If you can't drive in the rain then pull off the highway and put your 4 ways on but not on the highway.

PackRat's Comment
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I got to thinking, I have never seen someone using there flashers in the manner you are talking about. I have seen them used when going very slow or coming upon a traffic slowdown or stoppage but never by anyone traveling at highway speed.

I have numerous times. Most recently was two nights ago navigating Dallas during a major thunderstorm while I was trying to make it to our Crete terminal in Wilmer.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Rob T.'s Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

I got to thinking, I have never seen someone using there flashers in the manner you are talking about. I have seen them used when going very slow or coming upon a traffic slowdown or stoppage but never by anyone traveling at highway speed.

double-quotes-end.png

I have numerous times. Most recently was two nights ago navigating Dallas during a major thunderstorm while I was trying to make it to our Crete terminal in Wilmer.

I remember it happening every storm in FL as navy pop pop described. Heck, about 2 weeks ago on I80 east of Iowa City around 0200 a J.R Schugel truck had them on while doing 65 in a 70 in dry clear weather for atleast 15 minutes before I lost sight of them. I have absolutely no idea what their thought process was on that one.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

One thing that irks me is trucks parked half a mile down the interstate at a rest stop and no lights of any sort on. I understand not wanting a violation but that's why you don't cut it that close. I know for sure I wouldn't get any sleep!

Another safety procedure people get wrong is the reflective triangles. It's rare I even see them being used but when they are the placement always seems wrong. They're either angled the incorrect way or the spacing isn't the way we were tested on when we got our permit.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

PackRat's Comment
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I think I've seen the triangles deployed correctly about five times.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar
"So - regardless of the weather conditions - if you are driving a moving vehicle, do not activate your flashing lights; it will only cause confusion and compromise your safety," Durkin said. Hazard lights can actually reduce visibility making other d

Help us understand then “why” on many of the Eastern Interstates it’s required (law) for a CMV to use the four-ways going up grade when their speed is 40 mph or lower.

How can that confuse anyone who happens to be following said truck crawling up hill in a 65mph zone. The best example of this (in my neck of the woods), is I-78 eastbound near Easton Pa near the NJ border. 30mph is what I was doing up that grade and heck yeah, my flashers were on.

Although I do understand your point; it’s just as important to be aware of each states vehicle code regarding the proper use of the 4-ways; and pay attention to specific signage on grades.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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